Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Romance
Show: Pride and Prejudice
Date: May 28 1947

CAST:
HOST
MRS. BENNET, very emotional
MR. BENNET, very dry
ELIZABETH BENNET
MR. DARCY
MR. BINGLEY
MR. COLLINS, unpleasant
JANE BENNET
SIR WILLIAM (1 line)
LADY CATHERINE, imperious

NOTE: Another version of this play aired on ROMANCE, August 29, 1944. This transcript includes material from the '44 broadcast in brackets.

MUSIC:

THEME UP AND UNDER ... OUT AT [X]

HOST:

ROMANCE! Tonight, Columbia brings you romance -- in the charming comedy "Pride and Prejudice."

Once again, the Columbia Broadcasting System brings you ROMANCE, great love stories of today and yesterday. Here you will find adventure -- the adventure of boy and girl, man and woman, in search of happiness with one another. Here you will find mystery -- the mystery of the human heart. [X]

Tonight, we take pleasure in bringing you Jane Austen's immortal love story "Pride and Prejudice" with Naomi Campbell as Elizabeth, who was too proud for love, and Eric Dressler as Mr. Darcy, who was too prejudiced for romance.

MUSIC:

FOR A STATELY INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--

HOST:

"Pride And Prejudice" is a story based on a certain belief, widely subscribed to by mothers at the turn of the Eighteenth Century.

MUSIC:

HARP GLISSANDO ... THEN OUT

MRS. BENNET:

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.

HOST:

The lady you just heard speaking is Mrs. Bennet, wife of Mr. Bennet, of the estate known as Longburn in England, and mother of five daughters. We're going to tell you the story of her second eldest daughter Elizabeth. Elizabeth Bennet was a beautiful girl. Proud? Oh, my, yes. And prejudiced -- oh, very strongly, against a certain Mr. Darcy. This is why.

MUSIC:

FOR A SMALL ORCHESTRA AT A BALL ... IN BG

HOST:

Elizabeth was at a ball given by a new man in the community, a Mr. Bingley, who appeared quite interested in Elizabeth's elder sister Jane. Well, at the ball, Elizabeth was sitting out a dance alone when she overheard--

BINGLEY:

Darcy! Darcy, why are you standing over here by yourself? Come, let's see you dance a few sets.

DARCY:

Thank you, no. You're dancing with the only pretty girl in the room.

BINGLEY:

Jane Bennet? She is beautiful; I'll not deny that. But there's her sister, Elizabeth, sitting over there to the right, who's very beautiful herself. Let me present her to you.

DARCY:

Sorry, old man. She may look all right to you, but she doesn't tempt me. And I'm not in a good enough mood to feel like putting up with young ladies who have no partners.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR A BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN, ANOTHER DANCE ORCHESTRA CONTINUES UNDER

HOST:

You can easily see why Elizabeth Bennet became more than a little prejudiced against Mr. Darcy. Well, the next time they came together was at an informal party at a friend's.

SIR WILLIAM: Mr. Darcy, you must permit me to introduce this young lady to you as a most desirable dancing partner.

DARCY:

Thank you, Sir William. Miss Bennet?

ELIZABETH:

You need not worry, Mr. Darcy. I have not the slightest intention of dancing. I'm sorry, Sir William. I'm a little tired this evening.

DARCY:

Surely you won't refuse me?

ELIZABETH:

I suppose I must be the first that ever has, Mr. Darcy. But I am rather critical of my dancing partners -- just as you are. And now, please excuse me.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR A BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN A HINT OF "CLAIR DE LUNE" IN BG

DARCY:

(MILDLY SURPRISED TO SEE HER) Ah, Miss Bennet?

ELIZABETH:

(UNHAPPY TO SEE HIM) Oh.

DARCY:

Don't you know that it takes two people to fully appreciate a moonlit evening?

MUSIC:

OUT

DARCY:

You shouldn't be sitting here all by yourself.

ELIZABETH:

What amazing conceit you have, Mr. Darcy, to think that you could add anything to a moonlit evening.

DARCY:

You don't like me, do you, Miss Bennet?

ELIZABETH:

That is an understatement, Mr. Darcy.

DARCY:

I'm very sorry -- for there is something that seems to draw me to you. The room was suddenly empty when you walked out of it. Or perhaps it was my heart. Why do you dislike me?

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy, I couldn't begin to tell you.

DARCY:

Well, then I certainly won't force myself upon you any longer. Good evening, Miss Bennet.

ELIZABETH:

Good evening, Mr. Darcy.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION (WITH ANOTHER HINT OF "CLAIR DE LUNE")

BINGLEY:

Well! Darcy, why are you walking up and down so late out here? It's almost three in the morning.

DARCY:

Why are you walking up and down so late, Bingley?

BINGLEY:

Oh, I think-- I'm sure--

DARCY:

Yes?

BINGLEY:

I have a suspicion I'm-- Darcy, don't you think Miss Jane Bennet is a truly remarkable girl?

DARCY:

Yes, but, uh, I haven't been keeping myself awake over that. I've been thinking what a remarkable girl Miss Elizabeth Bennet is.

BINGLEY:

I thought you didn't like her.

DARCY:

I don't. But I seem to have become a little mixed up in my emotions.

MUSIC:

ANOTHER "CLAIR DE LUNE" TRANSITION

JANE:

(WEARILY) Oh, it's so late, Elizabeth. We really should go to bed.

ELIZABETH:

(DREAMILY) I know, Jane. But the moonlight is so bright.

JANE:

Oh, Elizabeth. Don't you think Mr. Bingley is very handsome?

ELIZABETH:

Very.

JANE:

And extremely clever?

ELIZABETH:

Extremely.

JANE:

And delightfully charming?

ELIZABETH:

Delightfully.

JANE:

(AMUSED) Elizabeth, you aren't really listening to me at all. What are you thinking of?

ELIZABETH:

(CRISP) How much I dislike Mr. Darcy.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION ... THEN MORE "CLAIR DE LUNE" BEHIND HOST--

HOST:

Now, while Jane and Bingley were busy dreaming about one another -- and while Darcy was dreaming about Elizabeth, and Elizabeth was thinking about how much she disliked him -- Mrs. Bennet was busy settling the lives of three of them.

MR. BENNET:

(YAWNS) Mrs. Bennet, will you please come to bed? You make me so nervous charging up and down the room that I can't close my eyes.

MRS. BENNET:

Really, Mr. Bennet, if you don't care anything about the future of your daughters, I do. I've got to get them married and settled. Good heavens, I have five on my hands -- and practically no one I know has more than two to worry about.

MR. BENNET:

(YAWNS) But, Mrs. Bennet, why not leave that in the hands of Providence for tonight? There's really very small chance of your getting them married at three in the morning.

MRS. BENNET:

Jane, of course, will marry Mr. Bingley. Now, Elizabeth-- I think Elizabeth must marry Mr. Collins.

MR. BENNET:

Mr. Collins? That unpleasant cousin of mine?

MRS. BENNET:

Mr. Collins told me Monday, when he arrived for his visit, that he wishes to marry and take a wife back with him. I think that may as well be Elizabeth.

MR. BENNET:

Elizabeth isn't in love with Mr. Collins.

MRS. BENNET:

In love? I can't wait around for her to fall in love. No, sir! Mr. Collins shall have your permission to speak to her tomorrow. And she will accept him.

MR. BENNET:

All right. (YAWNS) May I go to sleep now, Mrs. Bennet?

MRS. BENNET:

Yes, Mr. Bennet. You may.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

COLLINS:

Miss Elizabeth, will you sit by the window, please?

ELIZABETH:

Yes, of course, Mr. Collins. But why?

COLLINS:

Miss Elizabeth, permit me to tell you that I have your mother's permission for this address. First, I think that every clergyman in easy circumstances should set an example in matrimony to his parish. Secondly, I think it will add greatly to my own happiness. And third, it is the wish of my patroness and esteemed friend Lady Catherine de Bourgh. She is prepared to think well of you--

ELIZABETH:

(INTERRUPTS) Mr. Collins, please. I thank you for the compliment you are paying me, but I must decline it.

COLLINS:

I am prepared to be refused at first. I shall not let it upset me. I shall ask you again. You see, Lady de Bourgh is most anxious to see me settled. And to see her own daughter settled -- with Mr. Darcy.

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy?

COLLINS:

Mm, they have been engaged since they were born. Lady Catherine and Mr. Darcy's mother made all the arrangements. Young Lady Catherine is very beautiful, you know. Although a trifle on the, uh -- (CLEARS THROAT) -- slender side for my own taste.

ELIZABETH:

(FLAT) I wish her great joy.

COLLINS:

You look unhappy about something. (REALIZES) Have you become well-acquainted with Mr. Darcy?

ELIZABETH:

(QUICKLY) No. No, I haven't. And I'm sure I never shall. He is the most impossible, vain, egotistical, unpleasant, ill-mannered man it has ever been my bad fortune to meet.

COLLINS:

I am very sorry, Miss Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH:

Sorry? About what?

COLLINS:

(ACIDLY) That you are so fond of Mr. Darcy.

ELIZABETH:

(SHOCKED) Mr. Collins!

COLLINS:

I'm sorry I didn't mention Mr. Darcy sooner. I would have known then why there is little hope for me.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION ... WHICH ENDS WITH A LIGHTHEARTED THEME FOR THE BENNETS

MRS. BENNET:

Mr. Bennet, you will kindly speak to your daughter Elizabeth immediately.

MR. BENNET:

(WEARY) And what has she done, Mrs. Bennet?

ELIZABETH:

I just refused Mr. Collins, papa.

MRS. BENNET:

I am not speaking to Elizabeth at the moment, Mr. Bennet, but I expect you to inform her that you insist upon her marrying him.

MR. BENNET:

Mm hmmm. Well, Elizabeth, an unhappy alternative seems to be before you. From this day, you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never speak to you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins. And I will never speak to you again if you do.

MRS. BENNET:

Mr. Bennet, this is the grossest insubordination!

MR. BENNET:

Yes, Mrs. Bennet.

MRS. BENNET:

Elizabeth, do you want to be an old maid?!

ELIZABETH:

I would just as soon, as marry someone I didn't love.

MRS. BENNET:

Ohhhh! As far back as I can remember, there has never been an old maid in either your father's family or mine! Oh! I'm going to be upset! Oh, you don't really want to upset me, do you, Elizabeth?

ELIZABETH:

No, mama, but I don't want to marry Mr. Collins either. And, of the two, having you stop speaking to me would be the lesser disappointment.

MRS. BENNET:

Ohhhhh, I am hurt deeply, Elizabeth -- deeply and gravely.

ELIZABETH:

I'm very sorry, mama. Please excuse me.

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS AS ELIZABETH EXITS

MRS. BENNET:

(TEARFUL) Oh, dear me. Oh, dear me. Girls nowadays are certainly not as obedient as they used to be.

MR. BENNET:

That may be just as well, Mrs. Bennet.

MRS. BENNET:

Oh, well. At least Jane has not defied me. Jane will marry Mr. Bingley. And then -- I will only have four girls to worry about.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS BRIEFLY ON PATH ... OUT WITH--

DARCY:

(SURPRISED) Miss Bennet? Oh, Miss Bennet!

ELIZABETH:

(POLITE) Mr. Darcy.

DARCY:

We, um-- We seem to be walking in the same direction.

ELIZABETH:

I can change my direction. [I'm only out for a little pleasant air. I've had a very wearing day.]

DARCY:

Oh, no, I'll change my direction. I wouldn't think of spoiling your walk.

ELIZABETH:

Just as you wish, Mr. Darcy.

DARCY:

This, um-- This seems as good a time as any to say goodbye, I suppose.

ELIZABETH:

Goodbye? I thought you and Mr. Bingley were going to be here all winter.

DARCY:

We had a change of plans. My sister's not been well and I'm taking her to Italy. Bingley's coming along with us.

ELIZABETH:

Oh.

DARCY:

[He and Gladys, uh-- Well--] There's been an understanding between them for some time. (BEAT) You follow me, don't you?

ELIZABETH:

Perfectly, Mr. Darcy.

DARCY:

Yes, I think they'll be getting married in the spring, as soon as it can be managed. When two people are in love, there's little good in waiting.

ELIZABETH:

Of course not. Especially if one of the people seems to be falling in love with -- someone else.

DARCY:

Yes, you do follow me. If you'll forgive my saying so, Miss Bennet, you have a designing mother and my sister's happiness is at stake.

ELIZABETH:

It doesn't matter to you, of course, that my sister Jane's happiness is at stake, too.

DARCY:

I should be very sorry if this causes her pain, but, after all, she and Bingley haven't been acquainted very long.

ELIZABETH:

(PASSIONATE) What right have you to interfere in other people's lives? Why should you persuade Mr. Bingley to leave when he and Jane think so much of one another?

DARCY:

Miss Bennet, if I thought your sister and Bingley could be happy, I'd do everything in my power to keep them together.

ELIZABETH:

Why don't you just mind your own business?

DARCY:

Because I'm not going to see a friend of mine taken in by a scheming woman. Your mother and sister have set out to trick Bingley into marriage by fair means or foul. And they're not going to get away with it. (BEAT, COOL) So now, good day, Miss Bennet. Good day and -- goodbye. I'm sorry that we were never able to get along -- because I think that you are a fine and beautiful woman, whatever I think of the designs of your mother and sister.

ELIZABETH:

Do you think I care what you think of me?

DARCY:

No, I entertain no such hopes, Miss Bennet. If I ever had any little conceits, you've long since destroyed them. [Undoubtedly, that will give you great personal satisfaction.]

ELIZABETH:

Goodbye, Mr. Darcy! I hope you'll be very happy in Italy.

DARCY:

If it's any consolation to you, I won't. You see, I haven't escaped entirely unscathed in this fray. I have a few wounds to lick myself. Goodbye, Miss Bennet.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION ... WHICH ENDS WITH A LIGHTHEARTED THEME FOR THE BENNETS

MRS. BENNET:

(LONG, RISING HIGH-PITCHED WAIL)

MR. BENNET:

(EXASPERATED) Mrs. Bennet!

MRS. BENNET:

(BRIEF INTERROGATORY WAIL)

MR. BENNET:

Will you kindly stop that infernal noise?

MRS. BENNET:

(LOWERING HIGH-PITCHED WAIL, THEN KEEPS WEEPING THROUGHOUT SCENE) Oh, my poor Jane! My poor, brokenhearted baby! How could any man be so cruel and blackhearted? How could any man go off without a word of farewell after all the attentions he showed her?

ELIZABETH:

Mama, mama, please! You're keeping everyone in the house awake!

MRS. BENNET:

How can you be so callous, Elizabeth Bennet? Don't you care that your sister has a broken heart?

ELIZABETH:

Of course I do, mama. But I think it would be so much better for her -- and for you, and all the rest of us -- if you would go to sleep.

MRS. BENNET:

Oh!

MR. BENNET:

Thank you, Elizabeth.

MRS. BENNET:

When I think of how that man has treated her -- going off without even saying goodbye.

ELIZABETH:

He sent a note to you, mama, and thanked you for all your courtesies to him.

MRS. BENNET:

A note! When I think how I felt when I read that note! (RISING HIGH-PITCHED WAIL AGAIN)

MR. BENNET:

(MATCHES HER WAIL, IN PAIN; A CURSE) Ohhhh, eternal perdition!

JANE:

(ENTERS) Mama! Please stop crying about me. I'm all right.

MRS. BENNET:

Oh, my baby! My poor, brokenhearted baby!

JANE:

Mama, I don't want to hear any more of this. It's humiliating and very upsetting. I'd appreciate it if you never mention Mr. Bingley's name to me again.

MRS. BENNET:

Oh!

JANE:

Come on, Elizabeth, let's go back to our room. Good night, papa; mama.

MR. BENNET:

Good night, girls.

ELIZABETH:

Good night, papa.

SOUND:

BEDROOM DOOR CLOSES

MRS. BENNET:

Ooooohhhh, Mr. Bennet! Now I've got to start from scratch again! I've got five daughters and not one husband in sight! (ENDS HER WEEPING ABRUPTLY) Oh, I declare I could just cry; I'm that disappointed.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

ELIZABETH:

(HUMS "THOSE ENDEARING YOUNG CHARMS")

JANE:

(UNNERVED) Please, Elizabeth, don't hum that song.

ELIZABETH:

Oh, Jane, I'm sorry, my dear.

JANE:

That's one of Mr. Bingley's favorite songs. [He sang it to me at the ball. Elizabeth, I'm afraid I love him very much. I ought to be too proud to admit that. But tonight I don't seem to have any pride. Tonight, all I can think is -- how lovely life was for a few weeks. How lovely it might have been.] Oh, Elizabeth, you don't know what it's like. You've never been in love. It hurts so much you want to die -- and yet you know you won't die; that you'll go on living with the hurt. And when the hurt finally goes, you'll be completely empty.

ELIZABETH:

(ABSENTLY) Empty. "The room was suddenly empty when you walked out. Or perhaps it was my heart."

JANE:

What are you talking about?

ELIZABETH:

Someone said that to me once.

JANE:

You never told me. Someone you love?

ELIZABETH:

Someone I --- might have loved.

JANE:

I know who, Elizabeth. I've guessed. Oh, I'm sorry I said that; it was selfish of me. You know far more about how love can hurt than I. I, at least, had a few weeks of happiness.

ELIZABETH:

I did not say I was in love. I only said I might have been -- if I didn't despise him so.

JANE:

Don't be too proud, Elizabeth. Pride is such a lonely thing -- when you choose it in place of love.

ELIZABETH:

Pride is all I have, all I've been offered -- and all I want. (ABRUPT, UNCONVINCING) Good night, Jane; I'm very sleepy.

JANE:

(SYMPATHETIC) Good night, Elizabeth.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

MRS. BENNET:

(EXCITED) Ooooh, Elizabeth my dear! That nice Mr. Darcy is in the parlor! He's come to call on you!

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy?! To call on me?

MRS. BENNET:

That's right; hurry along, dear. No, wait a minute, let me straighten your hair.

ELIZABETH:

Oh, mama--

MRS. BENNET:

Run along now. Run along.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS

ELIZABETH:

Well, Mr. Darcy, this is a surprise.

DARCY:

Good afternoon, Miss Bennet.

ELIZABETH:

You're looking thin and not a bit well. Didn't Italy agree with you?

DARCY:

Not too much, no. Miss Bennet, there's, uh-- There's something I must tell you.

ELIZABETH:

Yes?

DARCY:

And it's - it's not at all easy since you've gone to so much pain to let me see how distasteful I am to you. But I - I love you. And I have to tell you.

ELIZABETH:

Have you lost your mind?

DARCY:

No. Only my heart.

ELIZABETH:

You've ruined my sister's life and then you have the impertinence to stand there and tell me that you love me.

DARCY:

I do love you -- with all my heart. And with all my heart I wished that you loved me, too. Elizabeth, will you marry me? I offer you a name of some honor through many generations; security and comfort. And my great devotion.

ELIZABETH:

You surely cannot think that I will accept you. Even you could not have that much conceit.

DARCY:

I hoped you might accept me; let's put it that way.

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy, I've never asked for your good opinion or your love, and I am amazed that you have chosen to bestow them upon me. [There have been a lot of tears shed in this house in the past few months, and you have been the cause of all of them.] I assure you that I would marry anyone in the world before I would marry you.

DARCY:

(HURT) Miss Bennet, don't think that you can make me ashamed of my love, because that's above reproach -- and the best that's in me to offer a woman. But I am ashamed of the object of my love. (SARDONIC) I thought that I was kneeling at your feet when I asked you to marry me. Now I see I was only stooping a little. Thank you for refusing me. Forgive me for taking up so much of your time. And accept my best wishes for your health and happiness.

SOUND:

DARCY'S FOOTSTEPS STRIDE AWAY ... DOOR CLOSES

ELIZABETH:

(WEEPS)

MUSIC:

TRANSITION ... WHICH ENDS WITH THE BENNETS' LIGHTHEARTED THEME

MRS. BENNET: (HYSTERICAL WEEPING) Oooooohhh!

ELIZABETH:

Mama, what is it?

MR. BENNET:

Why, what's wrong, my dear?

MRS. BENNET:

It's Lydia! Our daughter Lydia! She's run off with a soldier! Look at this note! Oh, my baby! My poor baby! Married without her mother there! Oh, God bless her. (STOPS WEEPING ABRUPTLY) Oh! Oh, Mr. Bennet, he will marry her, won't he? No soldier would be so low as to run off with a young lady and not marry her, would he?

MR. BENNET:

What do you think, Mrs. Bennet?

MRS. BENNET:

Oooh, Mr. Bennet! Oooh, Elizabeth! Oooh, what am I to do?! This will ruin us all! We'll never get any husbands!

MR. BENNET:

You have all the law allows, my dear.

MRS. BENNET:

Aren't you going to get your horsewhip and go after that man, Mr. Bennet?

MR. BENNET:

Yes, madam, I am -- as soon as I can get dressed! (BEAT, TO HIMSELF) Someone should have warned me what marriage can lead to. I might have avoided all this thirty years ago.

MRS. BENNET:

Oooh, Mr. Bennet!

MR. BENNET:

Madam, be silent! If Lydia isn't married now, she will be very soon. I'll see to that!

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

ELIZABETH:

Papa?

MR. BENNET:

Yes, Elizabeth?

ELIZABETH:

I want to talk to you.

MR. BENNET:

Mmm? What is it, Elizabeth?

ELIZABETH:

When you went up to London and got Lydia married, just how did you manage it?

MR. BENNET:

Oh, it was very simple, my dear.

ELIZABETH:

Lydia said you gave them a thousand pounds. Where did you get the thousand pounds, papa?

MR. BENNET:

From Mr. Darcy, Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy?!

MR. BENNET:

Yes, my dear. He came to see me. He heard about Lydia and he said the only way to straighten things out was to give them some money to get them started.

ELIZABETH:

You shouldn't have accepted any money from Mr. Darcy. He's not a friend of ours, papa.

MR. BENNET:

Not a friend?

ELIZABETH:

No.

MR. BENNET:

He's a friend indeed. And a friend in need. If that isn't a friend, I don't know what is. I wanted to give them the money at once, but my solicitors couldn't be reached. Mr. Darcy kindly leant me the money. I paid him back the next morning.

ELIZABETH:

If only it hadn't been Mr. Darcy.

MR. BENNET:

[It's a shame you can't find anything good about Mr. Darcy, Elizabeth. And it's a shame that you resent it when you come face to face with something that's so kind and good you can't deny it.] (GENTLY) Elizabeth my dear, are you in love with Mr. Darcy?

ELIZABETH:

Why does everyone keep asking me if I'm in love with that man?!

MR. BENNET:

(SLOWLY) Because, maybe, you have so many symptoms.

ELIZABETH:

(DEFENSIVE) It takes more than symptoms to make a case of anything. (TEARFUL) I'm not in love with him -- and no matter what he does for this family, I'm not going to be in love with him!

MR. BENNET:

(SOOTHING) All right, Elizabeth, all right.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

CATHERINE:

Miss Bennet? I am Lady Catherine de Bourgh.

ELIZABETH:

This is quite an honor, Lady Catherine, that you should call on me.

CATHERINE:

Yes. It is. I've come to talk to you about my nephew Mr. Darcy, who is going to marry my daughter.

ELIZABETH:

Indeed? Please congratulate them both for me.

CATHERINE:

Don't be impudent.

ELIZABETH:

But I thought I was being polite.

CATHERINE:

You were being sarcastic, and therefore rude and impudent. Miss Bennet, I will be my usual frank self. I've heard rumors that you and my nephew were to be married, which I knew must be a scandalous falsehood, and I want the report universally contradicted.

ELIZABETH:

Your coming here is likely to appear a confirmation rather than a contradiction.

CATHERINE:

I am not going to have my plans upset by a young woman without family connections -- or fortune. I wish to know once and for all. Are you engaged to Mr. Darcy?

ELIZABETH:

(BEAT, SIMPLY) I am not.

CATHERINE:

(PLEASED) Ahhhhh! Will you promise me never to enter into such an engagement?

ELIZABETH:

(DEFIANT) I will not!

CATHERINE:

Hmmph! You are then, uh, resolved to have him?

ELIZABETH:

I did not say that. Lady Catherine, you're not going to order me about. My life is my own to plan as I see fit. I've managed to live a good many years without any help or interference from you. And I intend to go on that way.

CATHERINE:

Miss Bennet, I am leaving. But I take no leave of you. And I send no compliments to your mother. I am seriously displeased!

ELIZABETH:

I understand, Lady Catherine.

CATHERINE:

Good day, Miss Bennet.

SOUND:

DOOR CLOSES AS CATHERINE EXITS

JANE:

(APPROACHES, THRILLED) Elizabeth! Oh, Elizabeth darling! Mr. Bingley and I have something to tell you; we wanted you to be the first to know.

ELIZABETH:

(WARM) Mr. Bingley, how do you do? I didn't dream you were in this part of the country.

BINGLEY:

I only returned this morning. Will you tell her, Jane, or shall I?

ELIZABETH:

You don't have to tell me anything. It's written all over your faces. I congratulate you both.

JANE:

(CHUCKLES)

BINGLEY:

When I think I wouldn't have known that Jane cared if it hadn't been for Mr. Darcy-- Well, I still get shaky.

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy?

BINGLEY:

Of course. He spent all those months in Italy telling me about Jane. I only left, you know, because I couldn't believe she cared and I wanted to try and get over her. But Darcy kept after me -- week in, week out -- saying, "Where's your courage? At least, go and ask her."

JANE:

We owe Mr. Darcy a great deal, Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH:

(QUIETLY ASTONISHED) Yes. So it would seem.

BINGLEY:

Elizabeth, he's down at the gypsy camp right now listening to their music. Why don't you go down and see him?

ELIZABETH:

(DECISIVE) Yes. Oh, yes, I must. Oh, I've been such a fool. I wonder if he'll ever forgive me.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, ROMANTIC--

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Darcy? I--

DARCY:

(SURPRISED) Why, Miss Bennet.

ELIZABETH:

It seems I owe you some apologies. And some gratitude.

DARCY:

Oh, please don't speak of them. It isn't gratitude that I want from you. Elizabeth, my Aunt Catherine tells me that she came to see you. (QUIZZICAL) And that you refused to promise not to marry me.

ELIZABETH:

It was shameless of me, I'm afraid, but, you see -- I hoped you might ask me again -- and I didn't want to be bound by promises.

DARCY:

And if I did ask you again, what would my answer be this time?

ELIZABETH:

Surely I don't have to tell you that.

DARCY:

(CHUCKLES) Well, you've told me so many unpleasant things, it would be nice to hear something more to my liking.

ELIZABETH:

Why, then, Mr. Darcy, if you did ask me again, I would say, "Thank you so much. I'll try very hard to make you happy."

DARCY:

(LOVINGLY) Oh, Miss Bennet--

ELIZABETH:

And I would say, "I've loved you from the first moment. But I found it very difficult to say so." And I would say, "I am yours now whether you want me or not, completely and forever."

DARCY:

Oh, my darling, my darling, I've waited so long.

ELIZABETH:

I know. We got all mixed up in a porridge of pride and prejudice. But it will be beautiful now, my darling.

DARCY:

Yes, it had to end this way. We were for each other from the beginning of time -- and always will be, until the end of time.

ELIZABETH:

I love you, Mr. Darcy -- very, very dearly.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR WHAT SEEMS TO BE A BIG ROMANTIC FINISH, BUT THEN CHANGES TO THE BENNETS' LIGHTHEARTED THEME ... THEN OUT FOR--

MRS. BENNET:

(WEEPS QUIETLY) Ohhhh, Mr. Bennet!

MR. BENNET:

(YAWNS) Mrs. Bennet, I'm very sleepy. What are you crying about now?

MRS. BENNET:

Lydia's married, and Jane and Elizabeth soon will be. And we've only two daughters left. They'll be married, too, before we're turned around. Ohhhh, Mr. Bennet, we're going to be so lonely all alone. (SOBS) I've lost my babies!

MR. BENNET:

Madam, you baffle me completely.

MRS. BENNET:

That's because you've never been a mother, Mr. Bennet.

MR. BENNET:

Praise God, I never shall.

MRS. BENNET:

[Amen to that, Mr. Bennet.

MR. BENNET:

Amen indeed, madam. And now please may I get some sleep?

MRS. BENNET:

Yes, Mr. Bennet. You may. Good night.

MR. BENNET:

Good night.

HOST:

Mr. Bennet is very tired, and we don't want to keep him awake so we'll just tell you that everyone lived happily ever after, as was the custom in those days, with no further prejudices and just the right amount of pride.]

MUSIC:

FOR A WARM FINISH

HOST:

CBS has brought you ROMANCE, great love stories of today and yesterday. Tonight's adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" was written by Jean Holloway. The music was conducted by Charles Paul. Elizabeth was played by Naomi Campbell and Mr. Darcy by Eric Dressler. And the director was Albert Ward.

MUSIC:

THEME ... THEN BEHIND--

HOST:

Next week, America's greatest writer about young people and young love tells his most famous story on ROMANCE. The writer is Booth Tarkington and the story is his immortal saga of Willie Baxter and the girl from out of town, "Seventeen." Be sure to join us next week when ROMANCE, the Columbia feature production, presents Booth Tarkington's "Seventeen."

MUSIC:

OUT

HOST:

There's no need to send food packages to persons in Europe by hit-or-miss methods. For a nominal charge of ten dollars, CARE, a nonprofit organization will send packages of food, woolens, cottons or blankets abroad. If they don't reach their destination, your money is refunded. For more information, write to CARE, Fifty Broad Street, New York City.

This is Sandy Becker speaking for CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.

WCBS ANNCR:

And this is WCBS, New York, eight p. m., B-U-L-O-V-A, Bulova Watch Time. America runs on Bulova time.

Sport fans, remember to hear the Old Redhead tomorrow night at six-thirty. Red Barber's guest tomorrow night will be Karl Schlademan, track coach of Michigan State college. For a spotlight on sports, it's Red Barber.