Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: X Minus One
Show: The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway
Date: Apr 17 1957

CAST:
ANNOUNCER
DAVE, the poet
MATHAWAY, the painter
GLESCU, the historian
CRITIC

SOUND:

HIGH-PITCHED ELECTRONIC HUM ... JOINED BY ELECTRONIC BEEPING IN AGREEMENT WITH COUNTDOWN

ANNOUNCER:

Countdown for blast-off. X minus five, four, three, two. X minus one. Fire.

SOUND:

A MOMENT'S SILENCE ... THEN ROCKET SHIP BLASTS OFF

MUSIC:

BUILDS VERTIGINOUSLY TO A CLIMAX ... THEN IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

From the far horizons of the unknown come tales of new dimensions in time and space. These are stories of the future, adventures in which you'll live in a million could-be years on a thousand maybe worlds. The National Broadcasting Company, in cooperation with Galaxy Science Fiction Magazine, presents -- (HEAVY ECHO) X Minus One!

MUSIC:

TO A CLIMAX ... THEN OUT

ANNOUNCER:

Tonight, "The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway" by William Tenn.

MUSIC:

FOR AN ARTSY INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DAVE:

(NARRATES) Everyone is astonished at the change in Morniel Mathaway since he was discovered. Everyone, that is, but me. They remember him as an unbathed and untalented Greenwich Village painter who began almost every second sentence with "I" and ended every third one with "me."

You see, I understand the change in him -- 'cause I was there the day he was discovered.

We were talking about his discovery that day. I was sitting, carefully balanced, on the one wooden chair in his cold little Bleecker Street studio, because I was too sophisticated to sit in the easy chair. [X]

MATHAWAY:

Come on, Dave, take a comfortable seat.

DAVE:

No, no, Morniel. Oh, no. I know about that chair.

MATHAWAY:

Now, what do you mean? It's the only comfortable chair in the room.

DAVE:

Yeah, I know, I know. Look at it -- broken-down spring, very high in the front and low in the back.

MATHAWAY:

Sure! It conforms with the position of the spine.

DAVE:

Yeah, sure, sure. And when you sit in it, things begin sliding out of your pockets -- loose change, keys, wallets, anything. What do you do, Morniel? Pay the rent on your studio with that easy chair?

MATHAWAY:

(LAUGHS) Well, as a matter of fact, it is rather profitable.

DAVE:

Mmm. And that's why I'll sit in the wooden chair, if you don't mind.

MATHAWAY:

Oh, now, don't be bourgeois.

DAVE:

Well, I notice you always sit on the bed.

MATHAWAY:

That's because I'm a good host.

DAVE:

I see. Well, how's the painting going?

MATHAWAY:

Oh, great. Great. Fabulous!

DAVE:

You sell any paintings?

MATHAWAY:

No! You know, Dave, I can't wait for the day when some dealer, some critic with an ounce of brains sees my work. I can't miss, Dave, I know I can't miss; I'm just too good. Sometimes I get frightened at how good I am. Why, it's almost too much talent for one man.

DAVE:

Well, there's always--

MATHAWAY:

Not that it's too much talent for me. I'm big enough to carry it, fortunately; I'm - large enough of soul.

DAVE:

Oh, good, I'm glad to hear it. Now, if you don't mind--

MATHAWAY:

Do you know what I was thinking about this morning?

DAVE:

No, but, to tell you the truth, I don't--

MATHAWAY:

I was thinking about Picasso, Dave. Picasso and Roualt. I'd just gone for a walk through the pushcart area to have my breakfast. (CHUCKLES) You know, the old "hand's-quicker-than-the-eye"?

DAVE:

Yes, I know, I've seen you do it. You're the only man I know who can ask directions to Houston Street and fill his pockets full of bananas at the same time.

MATHAWAY:

Oh, well, society owes the artist something.

DAVE:

Mm hm.

MATHAWAY:

Anyway, I started to think about the art of modern painting. I think about that a lot, Dave. It troubles me.

DAVE:

You do, huh? Well, I tend to--

MATHAWAY:

I was thinking. Who is really doing important work in painting today? Who is really an unquestionable great? I could think of only three names! Picasso, Roualt -- and me.

DAVE:

Well, naturally.

MATHAWAY:

Just three names, no more. Oh, it made me feel very lonely, Dave.

DAVE:

Yeah, well, I can see that. But then--

MATHAWAY:

And then I asked myself, why is this so? Has absolute genius always been so rare? Why has my impending discovery been delayed so long? Oh, I thought about it for a long time, Dave. I thought about it humbly, carefully, because it's an important question. And this is the answer I came up with!

MUSIC:

FOR A DULL LECTURE ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DAVE:

(NARRATES) Well, don't bother waiting for the answer that Morniel came up with. It turned out to be a theory of esthetics I'd heard at least a dozen times before, from a dozen other painters in the Village. Morniel was a bad painter, there was no question about it. I say that not only from my opinion. I've roomed with two modern painters and I've been married for a year to another. But-- Well, for example, a friend of mine, a fine critic of modern art, took a look at one of Morniel's paintings which he hung over my fireplace in spite of my protests, and just kind of stared slack-jawed. [X]

CRITIC:

What - what does he call that technique?

DAVE:

Why, he says it's "smudge-on-smudge."

CRITIC:

Well, I can believe it. Smudge-on-smudge, white-on-white, non-objectivism, neo-abstractionism, call it what you like, there's nothing there, nothing! Why, it doesn't even have the interest of those paintings that chimpanzee did a couple of years ago. He's just another of these loudmouth, frowzy, frustrated dilettantes that infest the Village. Why do you waste your time with him?

DAVE:

Well, for one thing, he lives right around the corner, and he's kind of colorful, in his own sick way. And he does have one great talent.

CRITIC:

It's not in painting.

DAVE:

No, no. No, you see, I just get by, as far as living expenses are concerned. Things like good paper to write on, good books for my library. So I can't touch 'em. And sometimes the yearning gets too great. You know, a newly published collection by Wallace Stevens. Well, if I find one I want, I just go over to Morniel's and tell him about it.

CRITIC:

He doesn't lend you money?

DAVE:

Oh, no, no, no. No, you see, we go out to the bookstore -- and we come in separately. And then I start a conversation with the proprietor about some very expensive, out-of-print item I'm thinking of ordering and Morniel just says, "Don't mind me, I'm browsing." Well, that's the high sign -- "I'm browsing."

CRITIC:

Well, what happens?

DAVE:

Well, while I'm keeping the proprietor talking, Morniel snaffles the Stevens.

CRITIC:

Isn't that just a little bit, uh--?

DAVE:

Oh, well, I - I intend to pay for them, of course, just as soon as I'm a little ahead.

CRITIC:

Well, why does he do this for you?

DAVE:

Oh, well, I pay off. I go through the same routine at an art-supply store, so Morniel can get canvas and paint and brushes. Of course, I really have to pay for Morniel's browsing. I have to suffer through listening to him, and then my conscience bothers me.

CRITIC:

Oh, it does?

DAVE:

Yes, you see, I intend to pay for my things. But I know he doesn't, and that's why my conscience bothers me.

MUSIC:

FOR A BAD CONSCIENCE ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DAVE:

(NARRATES) Well, here he was, the day he was discovered, sitting in his room and Morniel was running on about his own genius. [X]

MATHAWAY:

Now, I can't be as unique as I feel. Other people must be born with the potential of such great talent, but it's destroyed in them before they can reach artistic maturity. Why? How? Well, let's examine the role that society plays in all of this--

SOUND:

HUMMING NOISE

DAVE:

Hey, wait. Wait a minute. What's that? You got a hi-fi set?

MATHAWAY:

Nonsense. That's a crass materialistic concept that I--

SOUND:

HUMMING GROWS LOUDER, IN BG

DAVE:

No, wait a minute. Something is happening. Hey, when did you put the purple lights in?

MATHAWAY:

Purple--? Oh, what's that?

SOUND:

HUMMING OSCILLATES WEIRDLY, IN BG

DAVE:

Look, look, it's shimmering. It's - it's coming right through the wall. It looks like a bus.

MATHAWAY:

We can't both be having an artistic vision. You're not the type.

DAVE:

No, I'm not, and I'm not drunk, either. Look out! Something's going to happen!

SOUND:

OF A TIME TRAVELER ARRIVING ... HUMMING UP AND OUT

GLESCU:

Morniel Mathaway?

MATHAWAY:

(STAMMERS) Huh? Who - who are you? Where'd you come from?

GLESCU:

You are Morniel Mathaway?

MATHAWAY:

Yes. Yes, yes.

GLESCU:

(CHEERFUL) My name is Glescu. I bring you greetings from Twenty-Four Eighty-Seven A.D.

MATHAWAY:

Oh.

DAVE:

Twenty-Four Eighty-Seven?

MATHAWAY:

A.D.?

GLESCU:

I realize this is a difficult phenomenon for you to grasp entirely, but here I am! We will now indulge in the twentieth-century custom of shaking hands. Mr. Morniel Mathaway?

MATHAWAY:

Oh, well, sure, sure, sure. Shake. Heh.

GLESCU:

And you, sir?

DAVE:

Uh, yeah, yeah. Sure, I don't mind. Shake.

GLESCU:

(QUIET ENTHUSIASM) What a moment! What a supreme moment!

MATHAWAY:

So-- What do you mean "what a moment"? What's so special about it? Are you the inventor of time travel?!

GLESCU:

Me? An inventor? No, no, no, no. Time travel was invented by Antoinette Ingebord in-- Well, that was after your time. It's hardly worth going into at the moment, especially since I only have half an hour.

DAVE:

Why half an hour?

GLESCU:

The skindrom can only be maintained that long. The skindrom is-- Well, call it the transmitting device that enables me to appear in your period. There is such an enormous expenditure of power required that a trip into the past is made only every fifty years. The privilege is awarded as a sort of Gobel. I believe I have the word right. It is Gobel, isn't it? The award made in your time?

DAVE:

Well, you wouldn't mean Nobel, by any chance? The Nobel Prize?

GLESCU:

That's it! The Nobel Prize. A trip is awarded to outstanding scholars as a kind of Nobel Prize. Once every fifty years, the man selected by the gardunax as the most pre-eminent -- that sort of thing, you know. Up to now, of course, it's always gone to historians. Oh, they've frittered it away on the Siege of Troy, and the first atom bomb explosion at Los Alamos, or the-- Well, the discovery of America, things like that. But this year--!

MATHAWAY:

Yes? Well, what, uh-- What kind of scholar are you?

GLESCU:

I am an art scholar. My specialty is art history. And my special field in art history is-- (A PORTENTOUS PAUSE)

MATHAWAY:

What? What? What?!

GLESCU:

You, Mr. Mathaway. In my own period, I may say without much contradiction, I am the greatest living authority on the life and works of Morniel Mathaway. My special field - is you.

MATHAWAY:

Dave? Dave, did you hear that? Dave? Dave?!

DAVE:

I heard.

MATHAWAY:

Do you mean--? Do you mean that I - I'm famous? That famous?

GLESCU:

Famous? You, my dear sir, are beyond fame. You are one of the immortals the human race has produced.

MATHAWAY:

That famous?!

GLESCU:

That famous!

MATHAWAY:

(SIGHS HAPPILY)

GLESCU:

(GRANDLY) Who is the man with whom modern painting, in its full glory, is said to have definitely begun? Who is the man whose designs and [special manipulations of] color have dominated architecture for the past five centuries? Who is responsible for the arrangement of our cities, the shape of our artifacts, the texture of our clothing?

MATHAWAY:

Me!

GLESCU:

You! No other man in the history of art has exerted such a massive influence over design. To whom can I compare you, sir? To what other artist in history can I possibly compare you?

MATHAWAY:

(HELPFULLY) Rembrandt? Da Vinci?

GLESCU:

Rembrandt and Da Vinci in the same breath as you? That's ridiculous! They - they lacked your universality, your taste for the cosmic.

MATHAWAY:

Wow.

DAVE:

Er, Mr. Glescu, excuse me, do you happen to know of a poet named David Dantziger? Did much of his work survive?

GLESCU:

Is that you?

DAVE:

Yes, that's me. Dave Dantziger?

GLESCU:

Well-- No, no, no, I don't think so. The only poet I can remember for this time and this part of the world is, uh, Peter Tebb.

DAVE:

Tebb? Never heard of him.

GLESCU:

Then this must have been before he was discovered. But, you see, I - I am an art scholar. Well, checking my chronometer, I see my time is getting short. But it is an overwhelming delight for me to be standing in your studio, Mr. Mathaway, and - and looking at you at last in the flesh. I wonder if you would mind obliging me with a small favor?

MATHAWAY:

Oh, sure, sure. You name it. Nothing's too good for you. What do you want?

GLESCU:

I wonder -- I'm sure you don't mind -- could - could you possibly let me look at your painting? The one that you're working on at this very moment?

MATHAWAY:

Well, sure, sure! I - I have one right over here. Just, er-- I'll pull the easel around.

SOUND:

WOODEN EASEL TURNED AROUND

MATHAWAY:

There you are. I intend to call this "Figured Figurines, Number Twenty-Nine." Hm?

GLESCU:

(STUNNED) Oh. But this - this--?

MATHAWAY:

What's the matter?

GLESCU:

Well, surely this - this isn't your work, Mr. Mathaway?

MATHAWAY:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. It's my work, all right. "Figured Figurines, Number Twenty-Nine"! Recognize it?

GLESCU:

(SOBERLY) No, I do not recognize it. And that is a fact for which I am extremely grateful. Could I see something else, please? Something a little later?

MATHAWAY:

Well, that's the latest. Everything else is earlier. Here, here, you might like this.

SOUND:

PAINTING PULLED OFF RACK

MATHAWAY:

Now, I call this "Figured Figurines, Number Twenty-Two"! I think it's the best of my early period.

GLESCU:

(TAKEN ABACK) Oh. Oh, dear. You know-- Well, this - this looks like smears of paint on top of other smears of paint.

MATHAWAY:

Right! Only I call it "smudge-on-smudge." But you probably know all about that, being such an authority on me. And now--!

SOUND:

ANOTHER PAINTING PULLED OFF RACK

MATHAWAY:

Here we have "Figured Figurines, Number Twelve"!

GLESCU:

Do you - do you mind leaving these figurines, Mr. Mathaway? I'd like to see something of yours with - with color. With color and - form?

MATHAWAY:

Well, I haven't done any real color work for a long time. Oh, wait a minute! Wait! (MOVING OFF) I have one over here somewhere. An old canvas. I was going to paint over it. Uh-- Ah! Here we are. (RETURNS) This is one of the few examples of my mauve-and-mottled period that I've kept.

GLESCU:

(SHUDDERS) Oh, I - I can't imagine why. It's positively-- It's-- Oh. Oh, dear.

MATHAWAY:

Oh, now wait a minute! Let me show you some of my intestinal period! Ah, here.

SOUND:

PULLS OUT ANOTHER PAINTING

MATHAWAY:

Here's a particularly good one. It's called "Large Intestine Rampant." Ha! You like it?

GLESCU:

(SHAKEN) Oh, please, please. I-- (SWALLOWS HARD) You know, I think I'd like to sit down.

MATHAWAY:

Well, take the comfortable chair.

SOUND:

GLESCU SITS IN CHAIR

MATHAWAY:

And here's another one, called, "Small Intestine Incisive." Oh, it's rather good, don't you think? I managed to avoid completely any definite line. You notice that?

GLESCU:

I don't suppose you have a drink of glaff-ax? Oh, no, no, of course, you don't, do you? It hasn't been invented yet. I--

MATHAWAY:

Oh, now, here's one that's bound to be great!

SOUND:

MATHAWAY UNWRAPS PAINTING

MATHAWAY:

It's one of my earlier smudge-on-smudges. It's called "Fly Ash."

GLESCU:

Mm.

MATHAWAY:

I painted it by coating the canvas with slow-setting glue--

GLESCU:

Mm.

MATHAWAY:

-- and leaving it out on the window for about two and a half hours. Notice the delicate deposit of soot.

GLESCU:

(NEARLY RETCHES) Please. Please, Mr. Mathaway, please, please--

MATHAWAY:

Oh, I've got lots more.

GLESCU:

You know, I don't understand this. All these canvases-- This is obviously before you discover yourself and your - your true technique. But I'm looking for a sign, a hint, of the genius that is to come. And I find-- I find--

MATHAWAY:

(DESPERATE) Well, how about this one?! Here, here.

GLESCU:

(DISGUSTED) Oh, please, please, please, please. Oh, take that away. Oh. Oh, dear. Oh, dear, no. No. Look, I'll have to leave soon. I don't understand this at all. Let me show you something here, gentlemen. Here -- a pocket edition of the source book.

SOUND:

GLESCU TAKES OUT BOOK

DAVE:

(READS) "The Complete Paintings of Morniel Mathaway, 1928-1996." (TO MATHAWAY) Were you born in 1928?

MATHAWAY:

Yep. May twenty-third, 1928.

SOUND:

GLESCU OPENS BOOK

GLESCU:

Here, look at the first painting.

DAVE:

(PAUSE, IMPRESSED) Well, that - that's beautiful. I mean, the color-- That's incredible!

MATHAWAY:

(UNIMPRESSED) Oh. (DISMISSIVE) Oh, well, that stuff. Huh. (DISINGENUOUS) Well, why didn't you tell me you wanted that kind of stuff?

GLESCU:

You mean - you mean you have paintings like this, too?

MATHAWAY:

No, no, no. Not paintings. One painting. I did it last week as a sort of an experiment, but I wasn't satisfied with the way it turned out, so I - I gave it to the girl downstairs. (SWEETLY) Would you like to look at it?

GLESCU:

(RELIEVED) Oh, yes, yes, yes. Very much, very much.

MATHAWAY:

Well, here, I'll just toss your book on the bed. Come on. It won't take a minute or two.

MUSIC:

BRIEF BRIDGE

SOUND:

KNOCK AT DOOR ... NO ANSWER ... KNOCK AGAIN

MATHAWAY:

(FEIGNS DISAPPOINTMENT) Oh, she isn't at home. I thought she'd be home now. Oh, I did so want you to see that painting.

GLESCU:

I want to see it. I want to see anything that looks like your mature work. But time is getting short. The chronometer--

MATHAWAY:

(FEIGNS INSPIRATION) I'll tell you what. Anita here has a couple of cats that she asks me to feed when she's away for a while. So she's given me the key to her apartment. Suppose I, uh, browse upstairs and get it?

DAVE:

Yeah, but she--

MATHAWAY:

(POINTEDLY, FOR DAVE'S BENEFIT) Suppose I browse through my room and get it? Get it?

DAVE:

(REALIZES) Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah, you go ahead and browse. Sure.

GLESCU:

Fine! Fine! But please hurry.

MATHAWAY:

Oh, sure, sure. I'll hurry. (MOVING OFF) I won't take long browsing.

MUSIC:

SNEAKY ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DAVE:

(NARRATES) Well, that was it -- the high sign. I'd seen Morniel Mathaway in action too many times as a shoplifter not to understand it. He was going upstairs to lift that book that he dropped on the bed. I knew he had never painted a picture like the one in the book -- but he would now. Only he wouldn't paint them. He'd copy them. [X] Well, I started talking automatically. (TO GLESCU) You, uh, paint yourself, Mr. Glescu?

GLESCU:

No, no, no, no, I-- Of course, I wanted to be an artist when I was a boy -- I imagine every critic starts out that way -- but I found it far easier to write about paintings than to do them. Once I began reading the life of Morniel Mathaway, I knew I had found my field. Not only do I empathize closely with his paintings, but he seemed so much like a person I - I could have known and - and liked. That's one of the things that puzzles me. He's quite different from what I had imagined.

DAVE:

Yes, I'll bet he is.

GLESCU:

Of course history has a way of adding romance to an important figure.

DAVE:

Mm hm.

GLESCU:

Oh, dear, I'm running out of time here. Do you think he'll be back with the key soon? I've practically no time left. I've just got to get upstairs to the time translator.

SOUND:

DAVE AND GLESCU'S FOOTSTEPS HURRY UP STAIRS BEHIND--

GLESCU:

I - I just can't wait. I'll have to hurry now. Oh, dear. And I did want to see an original Mathaway. I did want to.

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS OUT AS APARTMENT DOOR OPENS

GLESCU:

Mr. Mathaway, I-- (STARTLED) Oh!

DAVE:

What's the matter?

GLESCU:

The time translator -- it isn't here. It's gone!

DAVE:

Yeah, the book is gone, too.

GLESCU:

And Mathaway! He stranded me here! He must have figured out that getting inside and closing the door made it return!

DAVE:

Yeah, he's a great figurer. And he'll probably figure out a very plausible story to tell the people in your time to explain how the whole thing happened. Why should he work his head off in the twentieth century when he can be an outstanding, hero-worshipped celebrity in the twenty-fifth?

GLESCU:

Yes, but what'll happen if they ask him to paint merely one picture?

DAVE:

Oh, he'll probably tell them he's already done his work and feels he can no longer add anything of importance to it. He'll no doubt end up giving lectures on himself. Don't worry, he'll make out. It's you I'm worried about. You're stuck here, aren't you? Are they likely to send a rescue party after you?

GLESCU:

No. Every scholar who wins the award has to sign a waiver of responsibility, in case he doesn't return.

DAVE:

Mmm.

GLESCU:

(RESIGNED) No, I - I'm stuck here. Tell me, is it--? Is it very bad, living in this period?

DAVE:

(THOUGHTFUL) Well, not so bad. Of course, you'll need a social security card, and I don't know how you go about getting one at your age, and-- Well, the immigration authorities may want to question you, since you're sort of an illegal alien.

GLESCU:

(UNHAPPY) Oh, dear, dear. That's awful.

DAVE:

Mmm. (GETS AN IDEA) Wait a minute. It needn't be. I'll tell you what. Morniel has a social security card; he had a job a couple of years ago. He keeps his birth certificate in that drawer along with his other papers. Now, why don't you just assume his identity? He'll never show you up as an imposter.

GLESCU:

Yes, but do you think I could? Won't I be--? Won't his friends, his relatives--?

DAVE:

No, he hasn't got any family and I'm about the only friend he's got. You could get away with it. Maybe grow a beard and dye it blond. Naturally, the big problem would be earning a living. Being a specialist on Mathaway and the art movements derived from him wouldn't get you fed an awful lot right now.

GLESCU:

But I could paint. I've always dreamed of being an artist. I don't have much talent, but there are all kinds of artistic novelties I know about, all kinds of graphic innovations that don't exist in your time. Surely that would be enough -- even without talent -- to make a living for me on some third- or fourth-rate level.

MUSIC:

FOR THE DAWNING OF A NEW ERA ... THEN IN BG, OUT GENTLY AT [X]

DAVE:

(NARRATES) Well, it certainly was. But not on a third- or fourth-rate level. Mr. Glescu -- that is, Morniel Mathaway -- is the finest painter alive today. And the unhappiest. After his last wildly successful exhibition, I remember he said to me-- [X]

GLESCU:

What's the matter with all these people, praising me like that? I don't have an ounce of real talent in me! All my work is completely derivative. I've tried! I've tried to do something, anything, that was completely my own, but I'm so steeped in Mathaway that I can't seem to make my own personality come through. And those idiotic critics go on raving about me -- and the work isn't even my own!

DAVE:

Well, then whose is it?

GLESCU:

Mathaway's, of course. We thought there couldn't be a time paradox, I wish you could read all the scientific papers on the subject -- they fill whole libraries -- because it isn't possible, the time specialists argue, for a painting to be copied from a future reproduction and so have no original artist. But that's what I'm doing! I'm copying from that book by memory!

DAVE:

Now, look, Glescu -- that is, Mathaway -- don't knock yourself out.

GLESCU:

But it's dishonest!

DAVE:

No, it isn't. You're deliberately trying not to copy those paintings. You're working so hard at it that you refuse to think about that book or even discuss it. As a matter of fact, when I tried to get you to talk about it a little while ago, you couldn't actually remember it.

GLESCU:

(REALIZES, QUIETLY) That's true. It's true.

DAVE:

You're the real Morniel Mathaway and there's no paradox. You're actually painting those pictures. You're not copying them from memory.

GLESCU:

I know in my heart that they're not mine.

DAVE:

Oh, all right, now, forget it. Anyway, you're a much nicer guy than Mathaway ever was. (LIGHTLY) And besides -- a buck is a buck.

MUSIC:

TO A FINISH

ANNOUNCER:

(BEAT) You have just heard "X Minus One," presented by the National Broadcasting Company in cooperation with Galaxy Science Fiction Magazine which this month features "Lulu" by Clifford D. Simak, a story which demonstrates that a spaceship should be a darb, a smasher, a pip, a beaut ... but man all battle stations if it ever becomes a sweetheart of a ship! Galaxy Magazine, on your newsstand today.

MUSIC:

CLOSING THEME SNEAKS IN UNDER FOLLOWING--

ANNOUNCER:

Tonight, "X Minus One" has brought you "The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway," a story from the pages of Galaxy written by William Tenn and adapted for radio by Ernest Kinoy. Featured in our cast were Leon Janney as Mathaway, Guy Repp as the critic, Wendell Holmes as Glescu, and Les Damon as Dave. Your announcer, Fred Collins. "X Minus One" was directed by Daniel Sutter and is an NBC Radio Network production.

MUSIC:

TO A FINISH ... NBC CHIMES