Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Lux Radio Theater
Show: I'll Be Seeing You
Date: Dec 24 1945

Thanks to the Seattle Radio Theatre for providing this transcription.

Announcer:

Lux presents . . . Hollywood!

(THEME MUSIC STARTS AFTER "HOLLYWOOD," GETS LOUD FOR A FEW SECONDS AND THEN GETS SOFTER AND CONTINUES UNDER NARRATOR AS HE READS THE INTRO)

 

The Lux Radio Theatre brings you Joseph Cotten and Dorothy McGuire in "I'll Be Seeing You". Ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. William Keighley!

(APPLAUSE FOR 5 SECONDS, AS APPLAUSE DIES DOWN, MUSIC ENDS, AND NARRATOR BEGINS)

 

Narrator:

Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen, and to those greetings may I add our heartiest wishes for a very merry Christmas. It's a privilege for me, for all of us, to share the enjoyment of this peacetime Christmas Eve with you. Traditionally, Christmas brings people closer together, and that's what happens in our play tonight. The poignant story of two people who find themselves very much in love, but whose yuletide happiness is shadowed by a strange threat. It's David O. Selznick's screen hit "I'll Be Seeing You", starring Joseph Cotten and Dorothy McGuire.

In true holiday spirit, one of our listeners in the east has just written me of a Christmas relief bundle that she and a group of women sent to friends and relatives in Lavik, Norway. Knowing that that country hadn't received a scrap of wool in five years, they collected all the woolen garments they could find: sweaters, caps, gloves, socks, dresses. "Then," she adds, "we knew we must send Lux flakes to care for them. And so those cheerful blue and white packages of Lux flakes became an important part of our Christmas bundle." To Mrs. Sorenson, the author of that kind deed, all our thanks. And I'm sure she and her friends will have the lasting thanks of Christmas-cheered Norwegians.

Here's the first act of "I"- One, of "I'll Be Seeing You", starring Joseph Cotten as Zachary Morgan, and Dorothy McGuire as Mary Marshall.

(THEME MUSIC - ABOUT TEN SECONDS)

 

On the twenty-first of December, just one year ago, a girl left the warden's office of a state prison for women. She walked across a wide courtyard to a massive iron gate.

Guard:

What's your number?

Mary:

Four-oh-seven-two-one. Here's my pass.

Guard (male):

(looking at pass or list) Uhh....Mary Marshall?

Mary:

Yes.

Guard:

Wait a minute.

(SOUND EFFECT: DIALS A ROTARY TELEPHONE) (SOUND EFFECT: PHONE RINGING THROUGH THE LINE)

 

Shelby:

(man's voice coming through phone line) Yes?

Guard:

Shelby? North Gate. Four-oh-seven-two-one, with a pass.

Shelby:

Check. Let her out.

Guard:

Okay, thanks. You're free as a bird, girlie. How long?

Mary:

Till the first.

Guard:

Remember that: Till January first - and don't cross the state line.

Mary:

I'll remember.

(SOUND EFFECT: BELL RINGING AS GATE OPENS)

 

Guard:

And don't forget, we'll be holding that nice little room for ya!

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Narrator:

And on that same morning, in a different section of the same city...

Doctor:

I can't tell you how glad I am to see you getting out of the hospital, Sergeant.

Zach:

Thanks, Doctor. I... I wish I had a little more of your confidence.

Doctor:

You're not entirely well, no. But the only thing that's holding you back is yourself.

Zach:

I'll do my best. What...what if I should get one of those, uh, spells while I'm away?

Doctor:

It's possible you will. Call a doctor, and then get in touch with us, or, any other army hospital. Just avoid excitement; don't tire yourself.

Zach. Yessir.

Doctor:

Remember, Zach, you're a normal human being. You've been sick, and now you're getting well. Now let's see, your leave will be over...when?

Zach:

New Year's Day.

Doctor:

Just have a good time, Zach. Good luck, and I'm proud of you.

Zach:

Thanks, Doctor. Quite an adventure, getting out in the world again. But I'll be fine. FADING OUT AS MUSIC BEGINS) I'm sure I'll be fine.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Narrator:

And that's how, an hour or so later, a girl named Mary Marshall and a soldier named Zachary Morgan looked at each other from opposite seats of a westbound train.

(SOUND EFFECT: TRAIN RUNNING ON RAILS, AS HEARD FROM INSIDE THE TRAIN)

 

Mary:

Excuse me, but you dropped your magazine.

Zach:

What?

Mary:

Here, your magazine, you dropped it.

Zach:

Oh (slight chuckle), oh - thank you.

Mary:

Going home on a furlough, Sergeant?

Zach:

I'm on a furlough. They - they gave me a furlough. You?

Mary:

Oh...I'm...taking a vacation. Christmas vacation.

Zach:

Oh. Uh, what sort of work do you do?

Mary:

Well, I - I -I travel. A traveling saleswoman... um, saleslady.

Zach:

(chuckling) Well, I haven't heard any jokes about traveling salesladies.

Mary:

(laughs)

Zach:

Guess there aren't any. You know, I - I would've guessed you were a secretary or a model maybe ...a schoolteacher.

Mary:

(laughs softly) Well, I- I was once a secretary, and I wanted to be a model, so that would've been pretty good guessing.

Zach:

Going to Los Angeles?

Mary:

Oh no, I get off quite soon, at Pine Hill.

Zach:

Oh, that's home?

Mary:

No, I'm just visiting my aunt and uncle.

Zach:

That's funny, I...I'm going to Pine Hill too, uh...my...sister lives in Pine Hill.

Mary:

Oh! Oh, I bet she'll be crazy to see you!

Zach:

I hope so. Maybe we'll run into each other there.

Mary:

Yes.

Zach:

Say, uh, would you like a cup of coffee or something? A sandwich...?

Mary:

Well, I - I...yes, I would.

Zach:

Good, I - I think there's a club car or something down this way... uh, oh...

Mary:

Oh! I'm sorry!

Zach:

My fault. I'm...pretty clumsy. I...keep bumping into people all the time.

(SOUND EFFECT: AMBIENT NOISE OF ACTIVITY IN FRONT OF TRAIN STATION)

 

Taxi Driver:

Taxi lady? Taxi?

Mary:

Oh! Yes, please! Well, goodbye, Sergeant.

Zach:

Goodbye. Oh - oh wait, wait...if, uh...if anybody tried to phone you, how could they get you?

Mary:

Well, my uncle's in the book - Henry Marshall.

Zach:

Henry Marshall?

Mary:

Mmhmm.

Zach:

Oh - oh well, uh...(slight chuckle) what's your name?

Mary:

Mary. Mary Marshall.

Zach:

Mary Marshall. Goodbye.

Mary:

Goodbye!

Zach:

Oh, if, uh, somebody calls and says it's Zachary Morgan, that's (chuckles) - that's me.

Mary:

(laughs) Oh, well I'm glad to know you.

Zach:

Have a good vacation.

Mary:

I will! You too!

(SOUND EFFECT: TAXICAB MOTOR STARTING)

 

Zach:

(to passerby) Oh, uh, Mister?

Man:

Yes?

Zach:

You happen to know of any hotels around here?

Man:

There's just one, Sergeant, but it's filled up.

Zach:

Is there a YMCA?

Man:

Why yes. You see that church steeple back there? Well, that's Center Street. You turn to your left, and you run right into it.

Zach:

Thanks, thanks a lot.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Clerk:

(FADING IN) You're in luck, Sergeant; just this one room left.

Zach:

It'll do fine; I'll take it.

Clerk:

Stayin' here for long, are you?

Zach:

Week or so, I'm - uh, I'm not sure. Oh, about the rent -

Clerk:

(interrupting) No hurry, boy. Just stop at the desk sometime. And if there's anything you want, (FADING OUT) you just holler.

Zach:

Thanks, I will.

(TRANSITION MUSIC - OMINOUS - CONTINUES UNDER ENTIRE SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR CLOSING)

 

Zach:

(to himself) Don't get worried, Zach. Don't get worried. You've got a problem, sure, but it's simple. You're to hang up your coat, unpack your bag, and put everything neatly away without dropping anything or bumping into the furniture.

(MUSIC GETS SOFTER)

 

You think you can do that? (whispering) Well, let's try.

(SOUND EFFECTS: CLOSET DOOR AND DRESSER DRAWERS OPENING AND CLOSING UNDER FOLLOWING MONOLOGUE)

 

(MUSIC RETURNS TO ORIGINAL VOLUME)

 

That (bandaged?) wound is all healed, but the wound in your mind...

(SOUND EFFECT: CLOSET DOOR CLOSING STRONGLY)

 

(grunt of effort or pain)...the wound in your mind is...it'll take a little longer. Don't get too tired. Don't give in; then you won't get in your (sigh of effort) those things that wind up with a shot in the arm, or ... (speaking more softly) an ice pack, or that...that little room. What's the matter, Zach? Forgot...forgot where you were for a moment? Don't worry; (breathing more heavily) you...you'll get well. You'll get well. You'll get well.

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER AND TRANSITIONS TO NEXT SCENE)

 

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, just let me look at you, Mary! Why, you haven't changed at all , not at all!

Mary:

(interrupting) Oh thanks, thank you, Aunt Sarah. Oh, it's good to be here!

Aunt Sarah:

We're so glad to have you!

Mary:

(laughs)

Aunt Sarah:

(calling) Barbara! Mary's here! (to Mary) You can share Barbara's room, dear.

Mary:

Oh! I - I don't want to disturb anybody.

Aunt Sarah:

(talking over her) Oh, nonsense! Now here, give me your coat. Barbara's seventeen now!

Mary:

(talking over her) Seventeen!

Aunt Sarah:

Mhmm.

Mary:

Oh!

Aunt Sarah:

But she's pretty spoiled though. I think an older girl would be a very good thing for her right now. Well, there's a million things to talk about, but first...you want to wash up.

(SOUND EFFECT: RUNNING FOOTSTEPS APPROACHING)

 

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Hi Mary!

Mary:

Barbara! Why, Aunt Sarah, she's a beauty!

Aunt Sarah:

(laughs)

Barbara:

Welcome home!

Aunt Sarah:

Take Mary up to your room, dear.

Mary:

If you're busy, Barbara, I can -

Barbara:

(interrupting) - Just follow me, lady, to my boudoir!

Mary:

(laughs)

Barbara:

Some boudoir! Practically no bigger than a ce - (starts to say "cell")

Aunt Sarah:

Barbara!

Barbara:

Oh, I'm sorry, Mary!

Mary:

Now look, we all know I've been in prison and that I'm going back to prison, so it just isn't right for anybody to try and cover up.

Aunt Sarah:

You're a wonderful girl, Mary. (FADING OUT) Now run on up, dear, take that bag, Barbara.

Barbara:

(FADING IN) Well, here we are, Mary. All the comforts of home!

Mary:

Mmm, it's nice, Barbara.

Barbara:

We have our own bathroom, see?

Mary:

Mhmm!

Barbara Oh...oh Mary, I was just thinking that...that's an awfully nice suit you have on.

Mary:

Well, thank you. You...were thinking something else, too.

Barbara:

Well, I guess I was. I just...well, but I never knew they gave vacations to people -

Mary:

(interrupting) -Well, I didn't know about it either, Barbara, until the warden told me. Yes, in certain states, they give special furloughs to people for good behavior.

Barbara Oh, I think it's wonderful they have that confidence in you!

Mary:

Yes, I think so too. Well, I'd better wash up.

Barbara:

There are two towel racks, Mary. (OFF MIC) Yours is on the left.

Mary:

(calling out) Thank you!

(SOUND EFFECT: WATER RUNNING IN SINK)

 

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) And the soap...

Mary:

Uh, there are two bars here.

Barbara:

Yes, I - I thought you might like a new cake. It's right there. Mary?

Mary:

Yes, I heard you. I'm not using your soap.

Barbara:

Well, I'm going to run downstairs.

Mary:

Thank you, Barbara.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Mary:

First I want to hear about Uncle Henry. How is he?

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, fine, dear. Except he works too hard. That darn drugstore of his!

Mary:

Oh, I've been so anxious to see him, Aunt Sarah. And you.

Aunt Sarah:

Mm, that's sweet of you, dear. But I guess you'd be happy to see, well, anybody. Has it been bad, Mary?

Mary:

Oh, I've survived. It's just this feeling I get about...coming out into the world again.

Aunt Sarah:

(interrupting) Now you listen to me: You did something, and you're paying your debt to society. Most people would be willing to let it go at that.

Mary:

I know, but I - well, I just don't seem to belong. I don't fit in...and, the dreams I've had for the future are just impossible.

Aunt Sarah:

Well, most dreams are, dear!

Mary:

But I'm not talking about palaces and rainbows. I'm talking about a home like this, with a kitchen and a stove and an icebox. And a husband. And a child.

Aunt Sarah:

Yes. I have all that. But I used to dream about palaces and rainbows.

Mary:

But you're happy.

Aunt Sarah:

Of course! Because I didn't hold out for too much. I accepted (what was?) second best. You have to get used to accepting what you think is second-best, and then you find out that it's first-best after all!

(SOUND EFFECT: TELEPHONE RINGING)

 

Oh Barbara!

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) I'll get it!

Mary:

(sighing) Well, I don't see how that could ever work for me. (chuckling) Well, I have time to think about it. Lots of time.

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Telephone!

Aunt Sarah:

Coming, dear!

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) It's for Mary!

Mary:

For me?

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, it's this way, dear, in the hall.

Mary:

Oh.

Barbara:

It's a man, Mary; he sounds super!

Mary:

(chuckles)

Aunt Sarah:

Come along with me, Barbara, (FADING OUT) we'll set the table.

Mary:

Hello? Oh, yes, Zach. Of course I meant it. Oh - well, what about your sister? Oh, that's too bad. Well, I'd love to Zach, but, um...oh, wait a minute. (whispering) Aunt Sarah!

Aunt Sarah:

(quietly) Yes, dear?

Mary:

(whispering) It's the soldier I met on the train.

Aunt Sarah:

Oh?

Mary:

(quietly) He came to visit his sister, but he just found out she's away, and he wants me to go to dinner.

Aunt Sarah:

But why not ask him here for dinner?

Mary:

May I, Aunt Sarah?

Aunt Sarah:

Why, of course! (whispering) Tell him to come right over.

Mary:

Hello, Zach? You ought to come here for dinner. Oh, but we want to! Hm? Oh, six-seventeen Elm Street. That's right. Good-bye.

Barbara:

Is he good-looking, Mary?

Mary:

Why, I don't know.

Barbara:

Didn't you ?

Aunt Sarah:

Now, that's enough, Barbara. Just get the table set.

Barbara:

Wow! A soldier for dinner!

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: KNOCK ON DOOR)

 

Barbara:

Dad, can I come in? Dad!

Uncle Henry:

(OFF MIC, MUFFLED AS FROM BEHIND A DOOR) Come in .

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR OPENING)

 

Barbara:

Mother says for you to hurry; Mary's soldier'll be here any minute.

Uncle Henry:

Oh that's fine. Tell Mother I'll be right down.

Barbara:

Dad...

Uncle Henry:

What?

Barbara:

You know, you never told me anything about Mary. Why was she sent to prison?

Uncle Henry:

You can find that out some other time. When you're older.

Barbara:

Oh, that's what Mother says. But I still don't see why I shouldn't know.

Uncle Henry:

Now, Mary made a little mistake, and that's all there is to it. Don't bother me now.

Barbara:

But they don't send you to prison for just doing nothing. What'll I say if he asks me about her?

Uncle Henry:

Just tell him that Mary's your cousin. And from that point on, they can mind their own business. Seems to me that your business might be helping your mother.

Barbara:

Oh, Dad.

(SOUND EFFECT: DOORBELL BUZZER RINGING)

 

Aunt Sarah:

(OFF MIC) Barbara! Doorbell!

Barbara:

I'll get it! I'll get it!

(SOUND EFFECT: RUNNING FOOTSTEPS, DOORBELL BUZZER RINGING AGAIN)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR OPENING)

 

Zach:

Oh, I - I - I'm sorry; I - I thought this was the Marshall home.

Barbara:

It is!

Zach:

Is Miss Marshall here?

Barbara:

I'm Miss Marshall.

Zach:

I mean (chuckling) Mary Marshall.

Barbara:

Oh! Well, she -

Aunt Sarah:

(OFF MIC, THEN GETTING LOUDER) ? Barbara! Stop teasing that young man! (to Zach) Oh, I'm Mary's aunt. You're - you're Zach.

Zach:

Yes.

Aunt Sarah:

Please come in. This is Barbara, my foolish daughter.

Barbara:

Hi!

Zach:

(chuckles)

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR CLOSING)

 

Mary:

(OFF MIC) Hello, Zach!

Zach:

Oh, hello, Mary.

Mary:

(chuckling) Well, you found it, alright.

Aunt Sarah:

Mary, take Zach into the living room, make him comfortable. (calling) Henry!

Uncle Henry:

(OFF MIC) Be right down!

Aunt Sarah:

Come along, Barbara!

Barbara:

Oh, Mother!

Zach:

This is swell, Mary. I haven't been in a real home like this in almost as long as I can remember.

Mary:

Oh, it's too bad about your missing your sister.

Zach:

Oh...Mary, I...I'm in this house under false pretenses. I...I really haven't a sister; I just made all that up.

Mary:

Made it up?

Zach:

Yes. When you said you were getting off the train at Pine Hill, I...I had to make some - some sort of excuse so I could get off too.

Mary:

Oh.

Uncle Henry:

(OFF MIC) Well, good evening!

Mary:

Oh, um, Uncle Henry, this is Sergeant Morgan, my Uncle Henry.

Uncle Henry:

Happy to have you here, Sergeant!

Zach:

(overlapping Uncle Henry) How do you do, thank you.

Uncle Henry:

Very happy. Make yourself at home. (clears throat) How about a little drink? I have some bourbon.

Zach:

(chuckling) Uh, thank you; I'm not drinking, uh, just now, uh...

Uncle Henry:

Well, I'll let you in on a little secret: neither am I.

Zach:

(chuckles)

Uncle Henry:

Funny thing; people that have it don't want it.

Mary:

(chuckles)

Uncle Henry:

People that can't get it - well, you ought to see the act they put on my drugstore to get that stuff.

Zach:

(chuckles)

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Dinner's ready! Come and get it!

(SOUND EFFECT UNDER THE FOLLOWING SCENE: DINING CHAIRS BEING MOVED ACROSS THE FLOOR)

 

Aunt Sarah:

Mary! Mary, you sit over here. And Zach - down there.

Mary:

(overlapping Aunt Sarah) Thank you.

Zach:

Thank you.

Barbara:

And Dad - no, I think you're supposed to be over there.

(GENERAL CONVERSATION FROM EVERYONE AT ONCE, FINDING SEATING AT THE TABLE (e.g, "Oh, thank you," "excuse me", "over there," "that's it", chuckling, laughing, etc.)

 

Uncle Henry:

I think I'll say a little blessing. We thank you, God, for our daily bread. We do our best to deserve it. Please look after all our dear ones, all the boys who are far from home, and all who are in the hospital. Amen.

All:

Amen.

Barbara:

You aren't used to saying grace, are you, Zach?

Zach:

Well, in the army, I guess you don't have time. But you said it as if you meant it, sir.

Uncle Henry:

I do, Sergeant.

Zach:

Makes me want to say that, well, I'm grateful too for... well, for being here. For everything.

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, thank you, Zach.

Barbara:

Hey, you must be quite a soldier!

Zach:

(chuckling) I wouldn't say that.

Uncle Henry:

Oh, let the man eat his soup.

Barbara:

But look! The Good Conduct Medal, two campaigns in the South Pacific, and the Purple Heart!

Aunt Sarah:

For Heaven's sake, where'd you learn all that?

Barbara:

A girl get's to know medals like she does boogie-woogie. (audience laughter) But the Purple Heart! Why, that means you were wounded! Oh, come on, Zach, tell us how you got to be a hero.

Aunt Sarah:

Barbara! And after dinner, you take off some of that lipstick. Looks as if you fell into a pot of paint. (audience laughter) Sergeant, you must have been disappointed not to find your sister.

Zach:

Well, yes, she's -

Mary:

(interrupting) Oh, she had a chance to spend the holidays in California.

Zach:

(chuckling) Oh, yes.

Mary:

It was quite...sudden. (chuckling) Uh, she wasn't expecting Zach, (to Zach) was she?

Zach:

(chuckling) Oh, no she wasn't.

Barbara:

Zach! Are you mad at me?!

Zach:

Huh?

Barbara:

Well, for asking all those questions?

Zach:

(chuckling) No, I'm - I'm not mad. You mad, Mary?

Mary:

No, I - I'm not mad.

Zach:

Uh, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall...?

All:

(laughter)

Aunt Sarah:

No!

Uncle Henry:

What's there to be mad about?

Zach:

I - I don't think anybody's mad.

All:

(laughter)

Uncle Henry:

Well, then for Heaven's sake, pitch in, everybody, pitch in!

(THEME MUSIC ENDS ACT I)

 

(AUDIENCE APPLAUSE)

 

Narrator:

After a brief intermission, we'll bring you Act II of "I'll Be Seeing You", starring Joseph Cotten and Dorothy McGuire.

Every screen picture started as an idea in the mind of a writer. Tonight, Betty Bryant, wife of Leslie Charteris, one of Hollywood's most famous writers of mystery stories, is here as our guest. Mr. Charteris wrote the famous "Saint" series, and Universal's current thriller, "Lady on a Train". Tell me, Betty, I hear Leslie writes very rapidly. What's his secret?

Betty:

Well, for one thing, he never changes a word.

Narrator:

Mmm! Sounds like genius!

Betty:

He says he really doesn't like writing. He'd rather cook.

Narrator:

He does that too!

Betty:

Yes. I don't mean just steaks and chops. Some of his more sensational recipes take a day to do.

Narrator:

Mmm. The most I can handle is scrambled eggs! You know, if I didn't know Leslie had written so many exciting stories, I'd say he'd missed his vocation. Which of his mysteries is your favorite?

Betty:

Well, my favorite story is "Saint Overboard", but my real favorite's something the public's never read; a letter Leslie wrote, asking me to marry him.

Narrator:

He wrote you, instead of asking you in person?

Betty:

Well, you see, I was singing in New York, and he was working here in Hollywood.

Narrator:

And now you're both here. Tell me, what does Leslie do besides work?

Betty:

Well, we both love to take our trailer for quick vacation.

Narrator:

Doesn't that mean extra work for you?

Betty:

I like it. We take a minimum of baggage, and (stocks?) of trusty Lux flakes, Mr. Keighley. Lux is a wonderful fresher-upper after a dusty ride; you know, for things like underthings and .

Narrator:

I'm sure John Kennedy'd like to hear you say that, Betty.

Announcer:

Yes, and thousands of women all over the country agree with Mrs. Charteris. They've discovered that Lux Care keeps pretty undies, as well as other nice washables, lovely much longer. In actual tests, slips and nighties washed with strong soap, hot water and rough handling, soon look faded and drab. But with Lux care, the identical garment stayed lovely three times as long.

Betty:

I don't doubt it, Mr. Kennedy. If Santa brings me some pretty new lingerie for Christmas, you can be sure that I shall continue to use Lux Care.

Narrator:

Well, Betty, I hope Santa is listening in. And many thanks for being with us.

We continue with Act II of "I'll Be Seeing You", starring Joseph Cotten as Zach, and Dorothy McGuire as Mary.

(INTRO MUSIC BEGINS, GETS LOUD FOR A FEW SECONDS, THEN DROPS DOWN AND CONTINUES UNDER NARRATOR AS HE READS THE INTRO. NARRATOR BEGINS RIGHT AFTER THE MUSIC DROPS DOWN)

 

Narrator:

It's about three hours since dinnertime, and down on Main Street, Zach and Mary are just walking out of the lobby of Pine Hills Movie Theater. Zach's face is strained and drawn, as he takes Mary's arm and heads aimlessly down the street.

(AMBIENT CROWD AND STREET NOISE)

 

Mary:

What's the matter, Zach? Chilly?

Zach:

Hm? Oh - oh, no, not chilly.

Mary:

(chuckling) I don't know where you're walking; we go the other way.

Zach:

Oh, right. Sorry.

Mary:

Zach, what's the matter?

Zach:

I just...nothing. Nothing's the matter.

Mary:

It was the picture, wasn't it? About the war? Zach, why didn't you say something?

Zach:

It - it - it wasn't such a bad picture.

Mary:

Is...war really like that?

Zach:

I guess so.

Mary:

You guess so?

Zach:

Well, they have experts making those pictures. I - I guess that's the way they see the war: a beach a mile long and thousands of soldiers and tanks and machine guns. I...I guess that's the way it is.

Mary:

It wasn't that way to you.

Zach:

Well, it...it - it's just a difference in size. To a guy that's in it, the war is about ten feet wide and kind of empty. It...it's you and a couple of fellas from your company, maybe, and, and the Japs. It...it's all kind of mixed up. Sometimes it's all full of noise and sometimes it's quiet. It depends on what you're thinking about, I guess...how - how scared you are, how cold you are, and how wet you are. Mary, you know what?

Mary:

What?

Zach:

I mean...well, usually I don't like to talk about the fighting. I - I never said anything about it ever before. Not to anybody.

Mary:

Oh, I'm sorry; I should've known.

Zach:

No, no...I...I feel kind of good! Let's have a drink or something.

Mary:

Alright. There's a place across the street.

Zach:

Yeah, well, let's see what it's like; (FADING OUT) let's go across the street.

(NO MUSIC; TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: AMBIENT NOISE OF A CROWDED BAR)

 

Mary:

This booth alright, Zach?

Zach:

Oh, it's fine. Sure all you want's coffee?

Mary:

(laughs) Positive.

Zach:

Oh, come on, it's Christmas. Sky's the limit. Have a piece of pie with it.

Mary:

(laughing) Not after Aunt Sarah's dinner.

Zach:

They're nice people, Mary. You're nice people, too.

Waiter:

Here you are, two cups of coffee.

Mary:

Thank you.

Waiter:

Say! I'm an old army man, myself.

Zach:

Cream, Mary?

Mary:

No, thanks.

Waiter:

I was in France in World War number one. And you know what? They're kiddin' themselves. This is exactly the same kind of war.

Zach:

(to Mary) Sure you won't have some cream?

Mary:

Thanks.

Waiter:

The Navy, Marines, Air Force - okay, great, great, great. But...this one's gonna be just like the last one. A soldier, like you and me - walkin' out on his own two feet and sluggin' it out with his rifle. With his bayonet!

Mary:

(to Zach) Sugar?

Zach:

Huh? Oh, uh, thanks.

Waiter:

You got enough in that bowl?

Zach:

Yeah, plenty.

Waiter:

Like I was sayin', when this thing starts, I try to sign up again. I tell 'em I want a chance to knock a coupla Japs' heads together. I'm strong, see? Squash 'em like a couple eggs, I could. But they wouldn't have me! Wouldn't let me fight! Why? On account of this: Look, look, my , see?

Zach:

Yeah.

Waiter:

Go on, go on, look. I don't mind.

Zach:

I see, I see.

Mary:

Zach...uh, are you sure you're alright?

Waiter:

It's - it's...kind of a twitch, see? I got a little shell shock. Well, it left me with this; I...nobody ever notices it, but that's what (turns me down?). Now -

Zach:

(interrupts) Now, shut up, shut up, shut up!

Waiter:

What's the matter with him?

Mary:

Zach, where are you going?

Waiter:

Hey, what's up, sister? Hittin' the bottle, huh?

Mary:

(FADING OUT) Zach, please!

(SOUND EFFECT: FOOTSTEPS ON PAVEMENT, CONTINUING UNDER ENTIRE SCENE)

 

Mary:

If we walk fast back, we'll get nice and warm.

Zach:

I'm, uh - I'm glad you like walking.

Mary:

Mm, a fine night.

Zach:

(chuckling) It's Christmas Eve.

Mary:

That's right, it is!

Zach:

Mary, I'm alright now, thank you. Thank you for not asking any questions.

Mary:

Sometimes I don't like questions, either. Let's just walk, hm?

Zach:

(FADING OUT) Let's just walk.

(NO MUSIC; TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: FOOTSTEPS ON PAVEMENT)

 

Mary:

I'd like to ask you in, Zach, but it's late, and -

Zach:

(interrupting) Mary, I...I think you ought to know something; I wish I could tell ya, I wish I could explain it. You probably think...well, I look fine, don't I? Healthy, don't I? Well, I am! Look, you see this rock?

Mary:

Yes.

Zach:

Well, watch. Watch me hit that lamppost down there.

(SOUND EFFECT: ROCK HITTINIG HARD SURFACE, DISTANT)

 

Mary:

(laughing) Oh! You're terrible! I'll bet I could do better than that. Now watch me.

Zach:

Sure. (FADING OUT) I - thanks, Mary, goodnight.

(SOUND EFFECT: FOOTSTEPS ON PAVEMENT, FADING OUT)

 

Mary:

Zach! (more softly, to herself) Zach.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR CLOSING)

 

Barbara:

Mary?

Mary:

(softly) Oh, hello Barbara. I'd thought you'd be asleep.

Barbara:

I've been writing letters. Look them all! I'm the pinup girl for five fellas. I keep up their morale, maybe!

Mary:

(chuckling) Well, must be nice to help somebody's morale.

Barbara:

Oh, you can write letters. You know, they just like to get mail from anybody. I mean, well, you - you don't have to know them awfully well to -

Mary:

(interrupting) When I was seventeen, I had trouble finding the right words, too.

Barbara:

Oh, I'm sorry, Mary. I keep hurting you. That's what I do; I keep hurting you, and I don't want to!

Mary:

I guess it's uncomfortable for you, to meet somebody like me. But, maybe when you get to know me, you'll feel differently.

Barbara:

Oh, I want to know you, Mary, really I do.

Mary:

Barbara, how much do you know about me?

Barbara:

Not much. Mother and Dad still treat me like child. Everything's a big secret.

Mary:

I don't think it would hurt you to know. As a matter of fact, it might help. Well, Barbara, when I was fifteen, my mother died.

Barbara:

Oh, I remember her! She used to make clothes for all my dolls.

Mary:

Mm. And not long after that, my father died. I finished school, and then I went to work. In a couple of years, I found myself working for a man...well, the kind of man you dream about when you're nineteen, and lonely. He was single, he was good-looking, and, well, I started dreaming. Bosses do marry their secretaries. So one night there was a party. It was the first time he'd asked me anywhere. It was at his apartment. Except that when I got there, there wasn't any party; only him. And then...he wouldn't let me leave. He'd been drinking, and...oh, it was all mixed up like some kind of terrible nightmare. Once I almost got away, when he fell over a chair. But he caught me and dragged me back. And then I pushed him. I pushed him as hard as I could. And he fell back. There was a low window, and he crashed through, screaming and clawing for something to hold onto. His apartment was on the fourteenth floor.

Barbara:

Oh Mary, how awful! But it's wrong! They shouldn't have sent you to prison!

Mary:

If I'd been lucky enough to get away before he was killed, there wouldn't have been any crime. A man was dead, the jury said manslaughter. That meant five years.

Barbara:

(sobbing) Please forgive me, Mary, oh please!!

Mary:

It's all right, darling; it's all right.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: PHONE RINGING)

 

Mary:

Hello?

Zach:

That you, Mary?

Mary:

Yes!

Zach:

This is Zach; good morning, Merry Christmas.

Mary:

Merry Christmas!

Zach:

Mary, I...I'd like to see you if I can, now. It's - it's sort of important.

Mary:

Well, certainly, Zach. Uh, do you want to come here? The family's just going to church.

Zach:

Well, I, uh...Mary, I, I want to talk to you about last night, and it may take some time.

Mary:

(wryly) Well, I have time, plenty of time.

Zach:

There's a bus that leaves the railroad station; it goes up to a lake. They say it's pretty out there, and we can be by ourselves.

Mary:

That'll be fine, Zach. I'll meet you at the station in twenty minutes, alright?

Zach:

Oh, that's fine, Mary, thank you, (FADING OUT) it's fine.

(NO TRANSITION MUSIC - NEXT SCENE)

 

Mary:

And just before they left for church, they insisted you come for Christmas dinner, so no arguments please.

Zach:

(interrupting) Now, now look, they don't know me from Adam; it's Christmas, I -

Mary:

(interrupting) Yes it is Christmas, and I'd say that was the best reason of all why you should come.

Zach:

Well! (chuckling) Well, sure, I'll be glad to.

Mary:

(chuckling) Well, that's better. Look, there's the lake, Zach.

Zach:

(chuckling) Not, not a very big lake, is it?

Mary:

(chuckles)

Zach:

W-we could sit here on this rock, if it isn't too cold.

Mary:

Well, let's try it out.

Zach:

This reminds me of the lake I used to go to when I was a kid back in Maryland. I had a job every spring there, preparing the boats.

Mary:

Oh.

Zach:

Mary, I...I want to tell you why I got mad at that man in the coffee shop last night, and why I walked away like that after I threw the rock at the lamppost and missed it.

Mary:

You don't have to tell me, Zach.

Zach:

Look, I was brought up in a home - an orphans' home.

Mary:

Well, that's nothing to be ashamed of.

Zach:

Well, I'm not. It's not like being in prison or anything like that.

Mary:

No.

Zach:

Well, in the home, uh, there was a janitor. He was a shell-shock case, too. Whenever we could get our hands on any fire crackers, we'd bang 'em off and laugh at him, the - the way he'd jump. Well, that fella in the coffee shop reminded me of him, and they, they both make me think of what I'd be in a few years. Only...the only difference is that now they have a fancy word for it, uh...Neuropsychiatric.

Mary:

The doctors must know a lot more about it.

Zach:

Maybe they do. But they don't know something about me that I know. You see, before I- I went in for engineering, I was an athlete; a pretty good one. I know what my timing used to be; the doctors don't. It's gone, Mary. Why - why, before this happened to me, I could've hit that lamppost all day. I - why, (chuckles) I don't know why I'm bothering you with all this. Yes I do. I'm bothering you because...because I feel so much better when I talk to you. I like to be with you.

Mary:

I like to be with you.

Zach:

Mary, I, I want to talk about you. Tell me.

Mary:

(unenthusiastically) Oh. What?

Zach:

(chuckling) Well, for instance, how did you become a traveling saleslady?

Mary:

Well, I started out wanting to be a model, and after that I got with this dress company and now I travel for them.

Zach:

Where? Well, after your vacation, where do you go?

Mary:

Back to Dallas, and then to New Orleans, Florida -

Zach:

(interrupting) Mary, can you make me believe in myself the way you believe in yourself?

Mary:

What makes you think I do?

Zach:

(chuckles) I can tell. The way you walk, the way you talk, the way you hold your head.

Mary:

(chuckles) Maybe that's just pretend, to impress you.

Zach:

No -

Mary:

(interrupting) Look! There's a boat down there.

Zach:

Yeah.

Mary:

And not a real boat; just a toy boat. At the edge of the water, see?

Zach:

Oh!

Mary:

right there in the mud.

Zach:

Yeah, some little kid once owned that boat.

Mary:

Mm. Probably thought it could take him all around the world and back.

(MUSIC BEGINS, PLAYS UNDER DIALOGUE AND CONTINUES THROUGH THE SCENE TRANSITION)

 

Zach:

I wish it could. Where would you like to go? Not, not Florida, or New Orleans; someplace like the moon, maybe.

Mary:

Mm. With a good breeze, maybe we could make it.

Zach:

Mary, if it, uh...were a real boat, and the moon a real place, would you go?

Mary:

You don't how I've been dreaming Zach. Yes, I'd go. I'd go.

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER THEN FADES, TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

Zach:

(chuckling) I'm getting to know your uncle's gate very well. This is where we were standing last night.

Mary:

(a little severely) What are you doing?

Zach:

Getting another stone. See how my timing is in daylight.

(SOUND EFFECT: STONE HITTING HARD SURFACE)

 

Zach:

Hey, what's the idea, knocking it out of my hand?

Mary:

I'm not going to have you run out on me again. (chuckles) Now come on in the house.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Aunt Sarah:

(calling excitedly) Here he comes, everybody!

(MIX OF EXCITED VOICES ALL TALKING AT ONCE, WELCOMING ZACH INTO THE HOUSE)

 

Zach:

You know, I never could figure it out; if the plum pudding is on fire, why doesn't it ever get burned?

Mary:

Must be the alcohol in the brandy.

Zach:

I guess that's it.

ALL:

(LAUGHTER)

Uncle Henry:

Personally, I think that's a terrible waste of good cognac.

Aunt Sarah:

Oh don't worry, Henry; there's lots left!

Barbara:

Oh, I wouldn't trust (Mama?) today (laughs)

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, now, I'm not going to listen to that again.

Uncle Henry:

You may not believe this about your dear Aunt Sarah, Mary, but last year she got as high as a kite.

ALL:

(LAUGHTER)

Aunt Sarah:

(interrupting) Oh Henry! Now...

Zach:

(interrupting) They're trying to drag out a family skeleton, Mrs. Marshall; (chuckling) I won't let them.

Uncle Henry:

True as I sit here! Had a glass of sherry to bring in the New Year, and by George, you should've seen her. She did about everything but - hey!

ALL:

(LAUGHTER)

Aunt Sarah:

(Oh, not here?), Henry! If you're in such good voice, how about a Christmas carol?

Mary:

Mm, something tells me Aunt Sarah is trying to change the subject.

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, nothing of the sort! Christmas carols go with plum pudding, and that's what we're eating; plum pudding!

Uncle Henry:

Alright, darling, alright. (clears throat) What'll it be?

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, I think I like "Little Town of Bethlehem" best.

Uncle Henry:

Fine. "O Little Town of Bethlehem" it is. (clears throat) Mi mi! (clears throat).

(HENRY STARTS SINGING; EVERYONE JOINS IN AT THE WORD BETHLEHEM)

 

O Little Town of Bethlehem
How still we see thee lie
Above thy deep and dreamless sleep
The silent stars go by
Yet in thy dark streets shineth
The everlasting light
The hopes and fears of all the years
Are met in thee, tonight

(EVERYONE TALKS AT ONCE FOR A COUPLE SECONDS)

 

Uncle Henry:

(talking over the others) Well, Zach, it's pretty good having another man around here.

Zach:

I - I can't quite tell you how I feel. This is the best Christmas I ever had. To think that...that -that you wanted me here, that you all had presents for me...yesterday I was a stranger here. I - I - I mean, I felt like a prisoner inside myself.

Mary:

(with emotion) Oh!

Zach:

Now...well, just to be in a home like this - maybe someplace I can come back to next month or next year...

Mary:

(crying) Oh, excuse me please. (leaves, but no sound effect)

Zach:

Did I say something?

Aunt Sarah:

Oh - oh, no, Zach, no. It's just that Mary's sentimental.

Uncle Henry:

Especially at Christmas.

Zach:

(interrupting) Well, I - I'd better... Oh, uh, Mary, Mary!

Mary:

(OFF MIC) (crying) It - it's alright. (ON MIC) I - I'm just so silly. (cries)

Zach:

Was it anything I - I did, Mary? Anything to do with what I - I talked about at the lake?

Mary:

(crying) It's just a...combination of things. The plum pudding, and the singing, and the very nice things you said.

Zach:

Mary, maybe I'd better get outta here.

Mary:

Oh it isn't polite to eat and run!

Zach:

(interrupting) I don't mean just this house; I meant Pine Hill. I ought to leave you alone.

Mary:

(crying) You're just fishing. You just want me to ask you to stay.

(MUSIC BEGINS SOFTLY, GRADUALLY GETTING LOUDER, PLAYING UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

Zach:

Well...ask me.

Mary:

Please stay, Zach.

Zach:

Mary, I...I'd stay forever if I could.

Mary:

Forever?

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER - TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

Aunt Sarah:

Well, Mary dear, time to go turn in, I guess. It's been a big day.

Mary:

Mm, and I had to spoil it with that scene at dinner.

Uncle Henry:

Now, honey, we'll have no more of that. (calling out) Barbara!

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Coming!

Uncle Henry:

Might have happened to any girl. Could've been just Christmas sentiment. Well, goodnight, Mary.

Mary:

Goodnight, Uncle Henry. Aunt Sara?

Aunt Sarah:

Yes, dear.

Mary:

I've been wondering if I should (recording completely blanks out here - no dialogue audible)

Aunt Sarah:

Not for the world.

Mary:

But why? Zach trusts me, and, well, it just doesn't seem fair.

Aunt Sarah:

But he's only been here for a few days. Why he mentioned that just now, just before he left. He's lonely. And you're making things pleasant for him.

Mary:

That's not the reason I'm seeing him. I like him, Aunt Sarah. I like him a lot.

Aunt Sarah:

Well, I assumed that, or else you wouldn't have asked him to the New Year's dance. But it isn't as if you were going to marry him.

Mary:

(darkly) No. It's not as if I was going to marry him.

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, Mary dear, I didn't mean it like that.

Mary:

I know.

Aunt Sarah:

Have fun, Mary! See Zach every day if you like. Just act like any other girl.

Mary:

I try, Aunt Sarah, but I - I just can't seem to make myself feel like any other girl; I...I just feel like me.

Aunt Sarah:

And that's pretty darn good if you asked me.

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Hey you two

Aunt Sarah:

But remember Mary, I don't think so. (OFF MIC) Uh, goodnight, dears!

Barbara and Mary:

(BARBARA STILL OFF MIC, MARY ON MIC) Goodnight!

Barbara:

She doesn't think so what?

Mary:

She doesn't think there really is a Santa Claus.

Barbara:

Huh? Oh.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

(STUDIO AUDIENCE APPLAUSE)

 

Announcer:

We pause now for station identification. This is CBS: the Columbia Broadcasting System.

(THEME MUSIC PLAYS FOR 20 SECONDS)

 

Announcer:

Our stars Joseph Cotten and Dorothy McGuire will return with Act III of "I'll Be Seeing You" after a brief intermission. Let's pretend we can see into the future. It's Christmas morning at the Browns', and Betty and Jane are opening their presents. Jane reaches for a package from Aunt Sue.

Jane:

Oh, let's open Aunt Sue's together, Betty.

Betty:

They're probably both alike.

Jane:

I wonder what she sent this time.

Betty:

Oh! Oh look, stockings! Oh no, not nylons.

Jane:

No, but they're lovely and sheer.

Betty:

Well, I can use anything I can get my foot in. I'm down to my last pair of stockings.

Jane:

Look, three pairs!

Betty:

Oh, swell!

Jane:

That'll see me through a couple of weeks

Betty:

A couple of weeks?! Why these will last me for months!

Announcer:

So, about a month later, the girls were dressing one morning, when:

Jane:

Oh, doggone it, there goes a run. Well, there's the last of my Christmas stockings. Guess little Janey will have to go shopping for herself. Oh, look, Betty, you couldn't lend me a pair for today, could you?

Betty:

Mm, I guess so. Look in the top drawer.

Jane:

Say! Aren't these your Christmas ones?

Betty:

Uh-huh.

Jane:

Well, haven't you worn them much?

Betty:

Of course. But I Lux them. What do you do with yours?

Jane:

(chuckling) Well, I... well, I'm not fussy like you! I used anything that happen to be handy.

Betty:

Mm, well I still have three pairs, and no runs

Jane:

Okay, I guess it serves me right. Do I get to borrow these, then?

Betty:

Oh sure! Look, I'll even let you keep this pair. But there's a string to it. Use Lux. If you don't get twice the wear you did from your others, you'll have to buy me a new pair.

Jane:

It's a deal. I'll certainly play safe and Lux them.

Announcer:

It's a safe bet that if Jane does Lux her stockings after wearing, she will cut runs way down. Because strain tests have proved, that with Lux, stockings retain their elasticity much longer. They don't go into runs nearly so quickly as stockings washed with strong soap, or rubbed with cake soap. For extra wear, give stockings gentle Lux care. Here's Mr. Keighley at the microphone.

Narrator:

We bring you the third act of "I'll Be Seeing You", starring Joseph Cotten as Zach, and Dorothy McGuire as Mary.

(THEME MUSIC PLAYS LOUDLY for 7 or 8 SECONDS, THEN GETS SOFTER AND CONTINUES UNDER NARRATOR AS HE READS THE FOLLOWING, TRANSITIONS TO BAND MUSIC TOWARDS THE END)

 

Narrator:

Seven days have passed since Zach Morgan and Mary Marshall stepped off a train together at Pine Hill. Christmas has come and gone, and now Pine Hill, like all the troubled world, waits with eager hope the coming of the new year. All the town's gathered tonight for the annual dance at the YMCA.

(MUSIC TRANSITIONS TO BAND MUSIC, GETS LOUDER AND PLAYS FOR 5 SECONDS, THEN DROPS DOWN AND CONTINUES AS THE BACKGROUND MUSIC FOR THE DANCE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: CROWD OF PEOPLE MULLING ABOUT; TALKING AND LAUGHING, AS AT A DANCE - CONTINUES THROUGH WHOLE SCENE)

 

Aunt Sarah:

(talking over music) My goodness, Zach! There isn't a woman here with prettier corsages!

Uncle Henry:

(talking over music) You've thanked the man a dozen times! Let him alone!

Mary:

(laughs) (talking over music) Aunt Sarah's right, Uncle Henry; you're just afraid Zach's spoiling us!

Uncle Henry:

(chuckling) Well, maybe I am.

Aunt Sarah:

The flowers make you feel so like a party! Oh, there's Amy Anderson! Wait till she sees my lovely camellias.

Uncle Henry:

Well, that's my cue, Zach; I guess she wants (FADING OUT) me to leave you and Mary alone.

Zach:

Alone in this crowd? How 'bout a dance, Mary?

Mary:

I'd love to, Zach.

(BAND MUSIC GETS LOUDER AND PLAYS FOR ABOUT 8 SECONDS, THEN SOFTENS SLIGHTLYAND CONTINUES UNDER THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

Zach:

(talking over music) You know, Mary, two weeks ago, if somebody had told me I'd be dancing with a girl like you, you know what I'd have said?

Mary:

What would you have said?

Zach:

I'd have said...I wouldn't be dancing with a girl like you (laughs)

Mary:

(laughing as Zach says the above line)

Zach:

You know, I used to be pretty good at this sort of stuff.

(BAND MUSIC STOPS)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: LAUGHING OF CROWD GETS LOUDER/EASIER TO HEAR)

 

Mary:

Oh, what's happened to the orchestra?

Zach:

Somebody must've tipped them off. Confidentially, it's just ten seconds to 1945.

Mary:

New Year's!

Zach:

Uh-huh.

(SOUND EFFECT: DRUM ROLL THEN CYMBAL CRASH)

 

Emcee or bandleader:

Ladies and gentlemen! May I be the first to wish you all a very Happy New Year!

(CROWD CHEERS)

 

(MUSIC STARTS AGAIN, PLAYING "AULD LANG SYNE", SOFTENS A LITTLE UNDER THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

Zach:

(close) Happy New Year, Mary.

Mary:

Happy New Year, Zach.

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER, PLAYS FOR 10 SECONDS, GETTING SOFTER AND THEN FADING OUT, TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: FOOTSTEPS ON PAVEMENT)

 

Zach:

I'm glad you wanted to walk home, Mary. It sure is a swell night.

Mary:

Mm. So beautiful I could -

(SOUND EFFECT: LOUD CROWD APPROACHING)

 

Mary:

What in the world is that coming down the street?

Zach:

Oh, just some kids

(SOUND EFFECT: FIRECRACKER OR GUN FIRING; CONTINUES INTERMITTANTLY UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE, ALONG WITH CONTINUING LOUD CROWD NOISE)

 

Mary:

(over the noise) Oh! What a racket! They're shooting something!

Zach:

(over the noise) Just firecrackers.

Mary:

Zach?

Zach:

(dismissively) Oh, it's alright, Mary, it's alright, I feel fine.

Mary:

Oh, look, they're throwing them! They're throwing them over fence there at that dog!

Zach:

(chuckling) Oh-ho; that's really a dog too, isn't it?

Mary:

Mhm!

Zach:

I don't mind saying I'm glad he's chained.

Mary:

Don't you believe in that saying about barking dogs?

Zach:

Well -

(SOUND EFFECT: BARKING DOG, CONTINUES UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

Mary:

(starting to panic) Look at him! He's pulling at his chain!

Zach:

Why Mary, you're scared.

(CROWD NOISE STARTS TO SUBSIDE BUT CONTINUES LOW, UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE. DOG BARKING CONTINUES)

 

Mary:

Well, he's such a big dog. Look, maybe we better cross the street.

Zach:

Oh, now, now, Mary. The thing about a dog is you must never let him know you're afraid of him. You have to treat him like an old friend. Now, watch me.

Mary:

Hm.

Zach:

Here. Here boy, here, here!

(DOG QUIETS DOWN FOR A MOMENT, THEN GROWLS, CONTINUES BARKING)

 

Zach:

Ah, yeah, you see what I mean? (chuckling) Yeah, I'd hate to run into him in a dark street!

Mary:

Well, what do you think this is?

(SOUND EFFECT: SCRAPING SOUND, BARKING GETS LOUDER, CONTINUES UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

Zach:

Mary, look out! He's loose! He's jumping the fence!

Mary:

Zach!

Zach:

Stay away, Mary, stay away!

Man:

(OFF MIC) (shouting) What's going on down there?! Zeus!

Girl :

(crying out) Oh! Oh! Get him off of me! Please get him off of me!

Mary:

Zach! Zach!

Man:

(OFF MIC) Come on, Zeus! Zeus! Get over here, Zeus! Hang on, mister!

Zach:

, get the dog!

Man:

I'm gettin' him, mister; hang on fast, mister, fast! Are you hurt, mister, are you hurt?

Zach:

but I'm alright.

Mary:

Oh, Zach, Zach.

Man:

Good thing you kept your wits, wrappin' that coat around your arm; that's the smartest thing you coulda done, mister.

Zach:

(a little out of breath) Yeah.

Man:

I'm-I'm sure sorry, mister; y-you're sure you're okay?

Zach:

I'm okay. Come along, Mary.

Man:

(OFF MIC) Come on now, Zeus

(SOUND OF BARKING FADES, BUT IS STILL AUDIBLE UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE, EVENTUALLY FADING OUT)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: FOOTSTEPS ON PAVEMENT)

 

Mary:

Oh...I-I can't stop shaking.

Zach:

You'll be alright in a minute.

Mary:

I'll be alright; I thought he'd tear you to pieces.

Zach:

Just a few scratches from his claws; he didn't bite me.

Mary:

Oh. You know something?

Zach:

What?

Mary:

Don't you realize what you've done?

Zach:

What?

Mary:

I bet you couldn't have done that a week ago.

Zach:

Done what?

Mary:

Oh, not just now with the dog; I mean all evening. I've watched you all the time. You've never hesitated for words, and your eyes haven't blinked, and - and then just now, I... well, I've never seen anyone whose reactions were so fast.

Zach:

(chuckling) I didn't even think about what I was doing.

Mary:

That's just it! And your timing; it was perfect.

Zach:

I hope you're right. I believe you are. Mary, yesterday you - you told me that in a week's time you can do a lot of believing.

Mary:

Well, you see, that fellow that's on the radio that says, "Life can be beautiful."

Zach:

You're beautiful.

Mary:

You're just saying that because you know I've got lots of money.

Zach:

You're wonderful.

Mary:

Because you know I have very influential friends.

Zach:

You're wonderful.

Mary:

Because of my social position.

Zach:

(almost whispering) Wonderful.

Mary:

Zach...ohhh.

Zach:

Yes. Mary, I...

(MUSIC BEGINS, CONTINUES UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

(SOUND OF FOOTSTEPS STOPS)

 

I know now I'm going to get well, and I've got plans, lots of them. And you figure in all my plans. You've got to figure in them, because without you I...well, I'm back where I started; I'm sunk.

Mary:

Zach, let's not talk about it now. I'm (chuckles), well, I'm kind of sleepy.

Zach:

Alright. I'm leaving early tomorrow, Mary, and before I go, I've got a lot of things to tell you.

Mary:

(softly) Yes. Goodnight, Zach.

Zach:

(softly) Goodnight, Mary. I love you very much. I want to kiss you.

Mary:

Zach, oh, Zach.

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER, TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

Mary:

(crying quietly)

Aunt Sarah:

(OFF MIC) Is that you? Mary, dear! (ON MIC) Mary, are you alright?

Mary:

(crying) Oh, Aunt Sarah, I love him so.

Aunt Sarah:

What're you going to do, Mary?

Mary:

(crying) I don't know. He's going to ask me to marry him.

Aunt Sarah:

Have you told him? About yourself?

Mary:

(crying) No.

Aunt Sarah:

Are you going back with him on the train tomorrow?

Mary:

(crying) Oh, how can I? I'm afraid to be alone with him now. Oh, Aunt Sarah, I mustn't tell him. And I lied to him at the dance. I told him I was going to stay there a couple of extra days.

Aunt Sarah:

Well, don't you think he's strong enough yet to know about you?

Mary:

I don't know. And I can't take that chance. He's getting well. I want him to go back to that hospital sure of himself...of himself, and of me. (starts crying again)

Aunt Sarah:

Remember, dear, what you have to do may seem to be second best, but it may work out to be first best after all.

Mary:

Oh, Aunt Sarah, I hope so.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Clerk:

Oh, evening, Sergeant. Should say good morning. Happy New Year.

Zach:

Thanks, you too.

Clerk:

Have a good time tonight at the dance?

Zach:

Oh, wonderful.

Clerk:

So, you're checking out tomorrow, you said?

Zach:

That's right, and I want to thank you; I've enjoyed my stay here very much.

Clerk:

That's fine, son, fine. Well, (FADING OUT) I'll see you later on.

(NO MUSIC; TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR CLOSING)

 

Zach:

Good evening, room; Happy New Year, room. Happy New Year, Zach. May I have this dance with you, Sergeant? Oh, and may I be the first to--(groans softly)

(OMINOUS MUSIC: LOUD, THEN SOFTER AND PLAYS UNDER FOLLOWING MONOLOGUE)

 

The room, it's spinning. Hold on, Zach.

(SOUND EFFECT: WOODEN CHAIR SCRAPING FLOOR, AS IF HE IS STEADYING HIMSELF ON IT)

 

Hold on; it's spinning like a top; don't let it suck you in.

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR CLOSING)

 

Hold on, Zach. (swallowing audibly) You're just a little tired, that's all.

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR CLOSING)

 

Doctor:

(in Zach's thoughts/memory) (AS IF COMING THROUGH TELEPHONE WIRE) Try to avoid excitement. Don't tire yourself. Avoid excitement; don't tire yourself.

Zach:

(sighing with effort) A lot of excitement. That...fight with the dog took a lot out of you; that's why you're sweating. Doesn't mean anything. Sit down, Zach. Sit down, sit down, sit down, Zach, sit down - easy! Take it easy. (breathing heavily) You're hot, Zach; it's starting again.

(SOUND EFFECT: HEARTBEAT; CONTINUES UNDER DIALOGUE)

 

It's bound to go away. Faster, faster! Don't get scared now, don't get scared.

Doctor:

(same effects as before) Call a doctor, then get in touch with us. Any army hospital. Call a doctor.

Zach:

Just one of those things, Zach; they told you it might happen. Hang on. It's sure banging away. But Zach, your - your heart doesn't really sound that loud; you're just...thinking it does, that's all. The doc told you that there's...nothing wrong with your heart. Beating fast like that; doesn't mean a thing; it doesn't...doesn't (grunt of effort; breathing heavily)...stop kidding yourself; this is it. You're in for it now, you - you thought for a minute it wasn't, but it is. You know the next step. You know what's coming now; you'd better call for a doctor. Let him get the hypo ready; . It's coming, Zach; it's coming.

(Sound of Zach's breathing and groaning under the following):

Mary:

(same effect as Doctor's voice above) Zach, you've got a week to believe. A week. You must believe, you must believe, you must believe, you must believe.

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER, THEN STOPS)

 

(SOUND OF HEARTBEAT CONTINUES)

 

You must believe, you must believe.

(SOUND OF HEARTBEAT STOPS)

 

Zach:

(after a pause and a sigh) It's gone. Gone. Oh, I made it. (breathing heavily) I made it, I made it, I made it, I made it.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Uncle Henry:

(calling) Sarah? I'm downstairs. Breakfast ready?

Aunt Sarah:

(OFF MIC) Just a minute, dear! Barbara down too?

Uncle Henry:

She's getting dressed. Where's Mary?

Aunt Sarah:

(OFF MIC) In the kitchen with me. One egg or two, dear?

Uncle Henry:

Three! I'm hungry!

(SOUND EFFECT: DOORBELL RINGING)

 

Work on those eggs; I'll get the door.

Aunt Sarah:

They're coming, dear; they'll be ready in a minute!

(SOUND EFFECT: DOOR OPENING)

 

Zach:

Morning, Mr. Marshall.

Uncle Henry:

Oh, hello, Zach. Happy New Year.

Zach:

Happy New Year to you.

Uncle Henry:

Come on in.

Zach:

Have a good time last night?

Uncle Henry:

Best party I've been to since last New Year's. Had your breakfast yet?

Zach:

Yes

Uncle Henry:

Well, here's a newspaper; make yourself at home. Be with you in a minute.

Zach:

Thank you.

Uncle Henry:

(OFF MIC) I'll drive you down to the station.

Aunt Sarah:

(OFF MIC) Who was it, dear?

Uncle Henry:

Uh, Zach. Morning, Mary.

Mary:

Good morning, Uncle Henry.

Uncle Henry:

He's in the living room.

Mary:

(calling) Zach?

Zach:

(OFF MIC) Morning!

Mary:

Hello! I was just fixing some sandwiches for the train.

Zach:

Wonderful.

Aunt Sarah:

Mary, don't you think you'd better get ready? I'll finish that.

Mary:

Yes, I'd better. I'll be down in a minute.

Aunt Sarah:

Go sit down, Henry; your eggs are ready.

Uncle Henry:

Yes ma'am.

Aunt Sarah:

We won't be long, Zach; (OFF MIC) hope you don't mind.

Zach:

Take your time. Besides, here comes Barbara.

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Hello, Zach, and Happy New Year!

Zach:

Hello, Barbara; my, you look nice.

Barbara:

(OFF MIC) Thank you. Is that your bag out there?

Zach:

Uh-huh.

Barbara:

Ooh! Sure look a lot better than you did a week ago!

Zach:

Feel a lot better.

Barbara:

You think the Marshall food did it?

Zach:

(chuckles) I think it was mostly your cousin Mary.

Barbara:

Oh, she's awfully nice.

Zach:

Yeah, I've noticed that too. You know what? I think I'll marry her.

Barbara:

Are you kidding?

Zach:

Well, not as far as I'm concerned.

Barbara:

Well, won't you mind waiting?

Zach:

Well, that's up to Mary. Things have worked out so well, that...well, I may not have to wait as long as I thought.

Barbara:

Yes, and the fact that they let her out of prison for Christmas is a pretty good sign.

Zach:

(pauses) What are you talking about?

Barbara:

You know, it wasn't until the other night when she told me how it all happened...that I realized it wasn't her fault at all. She's not a criminal.

Zach:

Criminal?

Barbara:

I mean like a real criminal. Oh, it's too bad you two can't go back on the train together. But then Mary isn't due in Easton till nine o'clock, and she wants to spend as much time with us as she can. After all, being in that awful place for three whole years -

Uncle Henry:

(OFF MIC) Come on, Zach, we're gonna be late. Mary!

Barbara:

Well, goodbye, Zach. Zach, is there something wrong?

Zach:

Wrong...

Barbara:

Well, have a nice trip, and come back real soon!

Aunt Sarah:

(FADING IN) Oh Zach, Zach I hate to say goodbye.

Zach:

Thank you again, Mrs. Marshall.

Aunt Sarah:

Good luck. And here, here's your sandwiches.

Zach:

Thank you.

Aunt Sarah:

Mary! (FADING OUT) Hurry, dear!

Mary:

(OFF MIC) Coming!

(NO MUSIC; TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: BUSY TRAIN STATION)

 

Uncle Henry:

You sure have been quiet, Zach, (when?) I sat down. Three's a crowd, eh?

Zach:

No, no; I - I - I didn't mean -

Mary:

Now, Zach, is there any special address, or do I just write to you in care of the hospital in Easton?

Zach:

Yeah, uh, care - c - care of the hospital.

Mary:

Zach!

Zach:

It - it'll get there alright.

Mary:

And you can write me in care of Uncle Henry.

Uncle Henry:

Sure, we'll forward it to wherever she is.

Zach:

Okay.

Mary:

Because I won't know what hotels I'll be stopping at, and -

Zach:

(interrupting) Sure, sure. Well, well goodbye.

Mary:

Goodbye, Zach. You will write to me?

Zach:

Sure, I'll write. And thanks again, Mr. Marshall.

Uncle Henry:

It was nothing, boy.

Mary:

Zach, what's the matter? What's wrong?

Zach:

Well ...well, not a thing; not a thing in the world.

(SOUND EFFECT: TRAIN ENGINE STARTING UP SLOWLY)

 

Mary:

Goodbye, Zach, goodbye.

Uncle Henry:

Good luck, Zach!

Mary:

Look, he's not even waving, Uncle Henry.

Uncle Henry:

What's the matter, I wonder. He acted kind of strange, ever since we left the house, hm?

Mary:

I think I know. Zach! Zach!

Uncle Henry:

He's gone, Mary.

Mary:

Oh, he knows! He knows about me. He knows.

(TRANSITION MUSIC)

 

Aunt Sarah:

(FADING IN) Better turn on the coffee, Barbara; Dad'll want another cup when they get back.

Barbara:

Mother, if you'd been in Mary's place, wouldn't you have gone along with Zach?

Aunt Sarah:

Don't ask so many questions.

Barbara:

Well, as long as Zach's willing to wait until Mary's out of prison, I don't see why -

Aunt Sarah:

(interrupting) Prison! Barbara! Barbara, you didn't tell him!

Barbara:

Well, wasn't Zach supposed to know?

Aunt Sarah:

Oh, Barbara!

Barbara:

Oh, why didn't anybody tell me? Why didn't you warn me?

Aunt Sarah:

I should have, I should have.

Barbara:

Oh, Mary's always treated me like a grownup. I didn't want to hurt her. Now I've done something terrible again!

Aunt Sarah:

They're coming in. Be quiet.

Barbara:

No, I've got to tell her; I've got to! Mary! Mary! (crying) Oh, Mary, I - I'm so ashamed of myself. Please forgive me. Mary, I love you...but I didn't know...I told him, Mary!

Mary:

(gently) Oh, don't cry, Barbara.

Barbara:

(sobbing) I told him!

Mary:

Please don't cry.

(MUSIC BEGINS AND CONTINUES UNDER THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

He had to know sometime. At least he didn't know until the last moment, and that's something. Oh please, darling, don't.

Barbara:

(continues to sob)

Mary:

Well, I'll go pack now. Come and help me, Barbara. There's a train in an hour; I...think I'd like to leave as soon as I can.

(MUSIC GETS LOUDER - TRANSITION TO NEXT SCENE)

 

(SOUND EFFECT: PRISON GATE BELL RINGING)

 

Guard:

Who is it?

Mary:

I'm reporting back.

Guard:

Oh...you. Marshall, isn't it?

Mary:

That's right.

Guard:

Have a good time?

Mary:

Aren't you going to open the gate?

Guard:

You've got a little time, yet, sister.

Mary:

What're you talking about?

Guard:

Down at the corner; guy's been waitin' for ya.

Mary:

Down at - Zach.

Guard:

When you're ready, (FADING OUT) just sound the bell.

(TRANSITION MUSIC; MUSIC CONTINUES UNDER FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

 

Mary:

(crying, breathing heavily)

Zach:

Mary, I - I didn't want to make you cry.

Mary:

There's nothing wrong with crying at a time like this.

Zach:

The minute I got on the train, I knew why you didn't tell me.

Mary:

(crying) Oh, nothing matters, except that you're here.

Zach:

I'm terribly ashamed for walking out like that. I need you, Mary. I want to feel that you need me.

Mary:

Oh, but I do. I do.

Zach:

I'll be right here. I'll be right here waiting. I'll be all well by then, and ready to make a new start, too.

Mary:

I love you so much, Zach. I love you so much.

Zach:

Oh, we'll get by, darling. Yes, I think we'll do just fine. Just fine.

(MUSIC CRESCENDOS TO FINALE)

 

(APPLAUSE FROM STUDIO AUDIENCE)

 

Announcer:

Our stars will return in a moment for a curtain call, and a word about our play for next week. Tomorrow, for the first time in two, three, even four years, millions of men throughout the country will be eating Christmas dinner with their families. The war is over for them, but their wives still have a job to do for their country.

Woman:

What kind of a job, Mr. Kennedy?

Announcer:

A job that will help all of us during reconversion. Saving used fats.

Woman:

But fats aren't rationed anymore.

Announcer:

That's just the point. Although food fats aren't rationed, there is actually less fat than ever for industry.

Woman:

But can't we import more?

Announcer:

Not yet. The islands in the Pacific that used to send us millions of pounds of oils a year still aren't producing. So, for example, the people who make soap have to share the available oils with other industries. That's why you can't always get all the soap you want.

Woman:

Will saving used fats help?

Announcer:

Yes. These fats are released for all sorts of heavy industry. That means, more of the fine oils can go into soap.

Woman:

Looks as if I'd better start right off saving again, Mr. Kennedy.

Announcer:

Good for you. This week you'll have an extra supply of used fats. Start by pouring the grease from the breakfast bacon or sausage into a tin can. Then, add the drippings from your Christmas turkey or goose, and don't forget to skin the giblet gravy after the dinner, and the turkey soup later in the week.

Woman:

Do I get anything for these fats?

Announcer:

Yes, indeed. Your dealer will give you four cents for every pound you turn in. But more than that, if you and every housewife in the country save used fat now as you did in wartime, soap supplies will become more plentiful. You won't have to wait for your favorite brand. Here's your producer, Mr. William Keighley.

Narrator:

Tonight we received one Christmas present a day early, in the form of two superb performances by Joseph Cotten and Dorothy McGuire.

Dorothy:

Thank you, Bill.

Narrator:

And I'm sure now that you're both eager to get back to your families and those Christmas trees.

Joseph:

(chuckling) Sounds good to me Bill. I've been away for so long on location.

Narrator:

How's that, uh, Technicolor epic, "Duel in the Sun" coming, Joe?

Joseph:

Well, we're still working on it.

Narrator:

It's you, Jennifer Jones, Gregory Peck, and half of Hollywood.

Dorothy:

You don't actually fight a duel in that picture, do you Joe?

Joseph:

Why, of course not, Dorothy; you know how the early West was - nothing more violent than harsh words at twenty paces! Tell me, Bill, what about your next play on Lux?

Narrator:

For New Year's Eve, next Monday night, we have what is certainly one of the most gripping pictures of the year. It's Warner Brothers' "Pride of the Marines", starring in their original screen roles: John Garfield, Eleanor Parker, and Dane Clark. If you feel like entering the new year with an extra measure of hope and courage in your heart, you'll find it in this deeply moving drama of a wounded veteran who refuses to become a burden to the woman he loves.

Dorothy:

That's a very timely picture, with so many of the boys coming home from overseas, Bill. Goodnight.

Joseph:

Goodnight.

Narrator:

Goodnight, and happy holidays!

(APPLAUSE)

 

(ORGAN MUSIC PLAYS "O COME ALL YE FAITHFUL" UNDER THE FOLLOWING WORDS)

 

Tomorrow is our first and long-awaited postwar Christmas, with families reunited and new hope throughout the land. But with our gratitude for peace should come a new conception of that word. For peace on earth has become a challenge the like of which the world has never known before. All of the nations of the earth are seeing themselves for the first time as fellow members of the human race, who must work in peace together if they are to survive their common enemies: greed, intolerance, and pride. The future is squarely in our hands. May God guide us in its management, and bless us not with wealth and ease but with tolerance and wisdom.

("O COME ALL YE FAITHFUL" ENDS, THEME MUSIC BEGINS AND PLAYS UNDER THE FOLLOWING WORDS)

 

On behalf of our sponsors, and those of us here in the Lux Radio Theater, may I wish you all a truly happy Christmas, and invite you to be with us again next Monday evening when the Lux Radio Theater presents John Garfield, Eleanor Parker, and Dane Clark in "Pride of the Marines". This is William Keighley, saying goodnight to you from Hollywood.

(APPLAUSE)

 

(THEME MUSIC BEGINS, CONTINUES UNDER THE FOLLOWING WORDS)

 

Announcer:

"I'll Be Seeing You", produced by Dory Sherry, was presented through the courtesy of David O. Selznick, producer of Alfred Hitchcock's "Spellbound". For its participation in American victory, the motion picture industry has received the official thanks of the United States Government, in the form of a bronze plaque detailing the industry's wartime achievements. Among these achievements is the contribution of forty-three thousand feature films, for Army and Navy entertainment and morale. These films continue to make possible six thousand movie shows a night, covering every region where our men in uniform are stationed. Radio too continues to serve as a medium of entertainment and morale, and these Lux Radio Theater plays are broadcast to our men and women overseas, through cooperation with the Armed Forces Radio Service. Our music was directed by Louis Silvers, and this is your announcer, John Milton Kennedy, reminding you to tune in again next Monday night to hear "Pride of the Marines" with John Garfield, Eleanor Parker, and Dane Clark.

(APPLAUSE)

 

(MARIMBA OR XYLOPHONE MUSIC, PLAYING SPRY THEME SONG UNDER THE FOLLOWING WORDS)

 

Announcer:

The Spry Treat of the Week!

(THEME MUSIC FINISHES UP)

 

Spry Christmas Cookies! Tender, full-flavored cookies, made quickly and easily with new, easy-mix Spry. Keep the cookie jar full during the holidays. Remember, for an adjustable, full-flavored food, you need pure, bland, all-vegetable shortening at it's creamy best. That's Spry: S-P-R-Y. Be sure to listen in next Monday night to the Lux Radio Theater presentation of "Pride of the Marines", with John Garfield, Eleanor Parker, and Dane Clark. And why not tune in a half hour early to hear John Davis over most of these stations. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.