Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Cavalcade of America
Show: Loyal Lady
Date: Oct 23 1951

CAST:
ANNOUNCER
REBECCA WRIGHT, schoolteacher
CAPTAIN, Confederate army
MOTHER, of Rebecca
WILL RUTHERFORD, Confederate lieutenant
JUNIUS, vegetable peddler / Union courier
SERGEANT (1 line)
SHERIDAN, Union general
2ND ANNCR
NBC ANNCR

A nice new transcript for you:




MUSIC:

CAVALCADE THEME

ANNOUNCER:

The DuPont Company of Wilmington, Delaware -- Makers of Better Things for Better Living through Chemistry -- presents THE CAVALCADE OF AMERICA, starring Diana Lynn as Rebecca Wright in "Loyal Lady."

MUSIC:

INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT BY [X]

SFX:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) Winchester, Virginia, September twenty-fifth, Eighteen Sixty-Four.

Dear Will,

Perhaps for the rest of your life you will hate me. And perhaps you're right to hate me.

I suppose that to you, and to most of our people, I have betrayed the cause of the Confederacy.

But I only know that each one of us, at one time or another, is tested. And in that hour, we must follow the dictates of our consciences.

That is what I had to do.

Last September, I was plain, ordinary Rebecca Wright, schoolteacher. And it was last September -- when General Early's cavalry was crossing the Potomac, riding almost into the suburbs of Washington -- that a Confederate officer came to my schoolhouse. [X]

SFX:

SCHOOLHOUSE DOOR OPENS ... HEAVY FOOTSTEPS TROD THE WOODEN FLOOR, THEN STOP

CAPTAIN:

(SURPRISED) Are you - Miss Rebecca Wright?

REBECCA:

That is my name, Captain.

CAPTAIN:

Oh. I - I expected an angular, pinch-nosed schoolmarm.

REBECCA:

(AMUSED) I disappoint you?

CAPTAIN:

On the contrary. But your face makes more difficult what I'm instructed to say to you.

REBECCA:

Oh? You bear instructions?

CAPTAIN:

From General Early. Miss Wright, it is our information that, two days prior to the Battle of Kernstown, you were seen in conversation with Major-General George Crook of the Union Army. (BEAT) Well?

REBECCA:

I do not deny it, Captain.

CAPTAIN:

May I know what you said to General Crook on that occasion?

REBECCA:

General Crook is an old friend.

CAPTAIN:

He is a Yankee.

REBECCA:

He defends the United States of America.

CAPTAIN:

I advise you to consider your words, Miss Wright. This is the city of Winchester, in Virginia.

REBECCA:

Captain, I teach my pupils geography. I teach them the geographical fact that, while Winchester is in the state of Virginia, it is also north of Washington, D. C. Now, I would be glad to continue the lesson, sir, but, as you see, school has been dismissed for the day and I am about to return to my home.

CAPTAIN:

Miss Wright, I asked you to tell me what you said to General Crook.

REBECCA:

Oh, very well. As best that I can remember, I said, "How is Mrs. Crook and all the little Crooks?" ...

CAPTAIN:

I was not sent here to joke with you. Once again, Miss Wright, what did General Crook say to you?

REBECCA:

He said, "Rebecca, are ya still loyal to your country?"

CAPTAIN:

And you answered, of course, that your first loyalty is to Virginia.

REBECCA:

I answered that I was born a citizen of the United States of America.

CAPTAIN:

Virginia has seceded from the United States of America.

REBECCA:

Yes, but, you see, my conscience will not let me secede.

CAPTAIN:

Up near Harper's Ferry, the Yankees have brought in a new general named Sheridan. Now it's Sheridan versus Early. Who you for, Miss Wright? Sheridan?

REBECCA:

(BEAT, QUIETLY) I'm not for Jubal Early.

CAPTAIN:

Well! At any rate, you're no liar.

REBECCA:

I - I try not to be, Captain. (BEAT) Am I under arrest?

CAPTAIN:

For the present, no.

REBECCA:

Thank you.

CAPTAIN:

But I advise you to be careful. My instructions are to inform you that you will be watched.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SFX:

HOUSE DOOR OPENS ... THEN DOOR SHUTS AND REBECCA'S FOOTSTEPS COME IN BEHIND--

REBECCA:

(SLIGHTLY OUT OF BREATH) Mother? Mother, where are you? (SEES MOTHER) Oh. (QUICKLY) A rather disturbing thing just happened to me. Just as I was about to leave the schoolhouse, I--

MOTHER:

(INTERRUPTS) Rebecca, my dear, you do rattle on. Can't you see? We have a visitor.

REBECCA:

Oh?

WILL:

May I present myself? Lieutenant Will Rutherford, Army of Virginia.

REBECCA:

(COOL) So soon, Lieutenant? And so very efficient.

WILL:

(PUZZLED) I beg your pardon? (CHUCKLES) I'm pleased to know ya, Miss Rebecca.

REBECCA:

Should I be pleased to know you, sir?

WILL:

But why not? It's very kind of you and your mother to take me in.

REBECCA:

Oh? We - we have taken you in?

MOTHER:

Yes, the poor man had his knee smashed by a bullet. He shall stay with us for the remainder of his convalescence. Now, tell the lieutenant how happy you are.

REBECCA:

(IRONIC) Why, I'm delighted, sir.

MOTHER:

There, Lieutenant, I told you! Now, do sit down and rest while I prepare your room and fix you a nice hot cup of tea.

WILL:

Thank you, ma'am.

SFX:

MOTHER'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY

WILL:

You, uh, you have a lovely house, Miss Wright.

REBECCA:

Thank you, sir.

WILL:

All the houses in the South'll be lovely again when we've settled our score with the Federals. With, uh, General Phil Sheridan's, for example.

REBECCA:

Oh, Lieutenant -- do you actually believe that all honor and virtue reside in the South? And all evil in the North?

WILL:

For a Virginia girl, you talk most strangely.

REBECCA:

I see. Then you do believe it?

WILL:

Oh, Miss Rebecca, I've no inclination to engage in controversy with ya.

REBECCA:

Very well. You may fold your hands and watch me.

WILL:

I beg your pardon?

REBECCA:

Your assignment, I believe. Now - now, how do you prefer to watch me, Lieutenant? Full face or in profile?

WILL:

(AMUSED) I've not made up my mind. Oh, Miss Rebecca, your face can distract a man from his duty.

REBECCA:

And what is your duty with regard to me?

WILL:

To see that - that a Virginia girl does not betray the Confederacy, her cause.

REBECCA:

My "cause" has nothing to do with my place of residence.

WILL:

You were born in Virginia.

REBECCA:

President Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky. Vice-President Andrew Johnson was born in Carolina. This is not a struggle of regions, Lieutenant; it's a struggle over principles. Which brings me, sir, to your lack of principle in telling my mother that you were wounded and therefore in need of her care.

WILL:

And you would prefer I tell her--?

REBECCA:

Well, the truth. That you entered this house with a lie. You told my mother you were wounded. You played upon her sympathy.

WILL:

In war, behavior is governed by duty.

REBECCA:

Thank you. I'll remember that. In the meantime, you have entered this house as a sneak and a coward.

WILL:

(LIGHTLY) I wonder - what your face would be like if you smiled.

REBECCA:

Oh, how like all males! I - I find you contemptible!

WILL:

Strange. I find you - very interesting. You know, it might be nice to kiss you.

REBECCA:

Oh, don't - don't behave like a puppy.

WILL:

And, what's more, I think you might find it rather nice, too.

REBECCA:

Lieutenant, you're a fool. (CALLS) Mother?!

MOTHER:

(OFF) Yes? What is it, Rebecca?

REBECCA:

I'm sorry to say that Lieutenant Rutherford imposes on your courtesy!

SFX:

MOTHER'S FOOTSTEPS IN

MOTHER:

(APPROACHES) Why, the lieutenant is our guest.

REBECCA:

The lieutenant is a boor.

MOTHER:

Rebecca Wright! You're speaking of a wounded Confederate officer.

REBECCA:

There is nothing wounded about him except his mentality.

MOTHER:

Oh, Lieutenant, I beg you to forgive my daughter. She can be a most foolish young person -- seeing only what she wishes to see. Now, sir, if you'd be good enough to come this way, I shall show you to your room.

WILL:

You are very kind, madam.

REBECCA:

Mother, I cannot--

MOTHER:

(INTERRUPTS) Now, not one single word, Rebecca Wright! I find your behavior most unusual -- and most displeasing.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

SFX:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) That day, Will, I despised you.

And those next days, when you shut yourself in your room and allowed mother to bring your food on a tray, I despised you both.

(CHUCKLES) Queer, isn't it, the amount of feeling you evoked in me? I should have known. [X]

You remember the afternoon I brought your food on a tray?

SFX:

KNOCK AT BEDROOM DOOR

WILL:

(BEHIND DOOR) Come in!

SFX:

BEDROOM DOOR OPENS ... REBECCA'S FOOTSTEPS IN

WILL:

(PLEASED) Well! This is an unexpected honor, Miss Rebecca.

REBECCA:

(COOL) My mother's wish. (BEAT) Where shall I set down this tray?

WILL:

Wherever you like.

SFX:

REBECCA SETS DOWN TRAY BRUSQUELY

WILL:

It goes against your grain to wait on me, doesn't it?

REBECCA:

(DRY) Shall I pour your tea or - or do you suppose there is enough strength left in your feeble body for that arduous task?

WILL:

(CONTRITE) Miss Rebecca, I ask you to excuse my conduct of the day before yesterday. My only excuse is--

REBECCA:

(BEAT, SKEPTICAL) Yes?

WILL:

I'm afraid there is no excuse. My conduct was unpardonable.

REBECCA:

(IRONIC) Oh, I see. We have tried the approach of the irresistible, overpowering male and, finding it unsatisfactory, we now adopt a new approach. Today, we shall be meek and contrite. (CHUCKLES, STRAIGHTFORWARD) Lieutenant, I prefer the arrogant liar to the humble liar. At least the first is manly.

WILL:

(STUNG) You are smug. Smug and self-righteous.

REBECCA:

But not a liar.

WILL:

Naturally not.

REBECCA:

I pretend no fevers; I do not go limping from room to room.

WILL:

Give me your word that you'll be loyal to the Army of Virginia and I'll not go limping from room to room. I'll leave your house immediately.

REBECCA:

Who are you to demand my word on anything?

WILL:

(GENUINELY) I'd be miserable if anything - happened to you.

REBECCA:

To me? Why?

WILL:

(QUIETLY) I don't know why. But I would be. Miserable. Oh, Miss Rebecca, this is a war. Those who are not for us are our enemies. I ask you please not to be my enemy. I-- (BEAT) You stare at me, Miss Rebecca.

REBECCA:

(ASTONISHED) Yes, you're - you're pale.

WILL:

(WEAK, AND GROWING WEAKER) It happens.

REBECCA:

Uh, here, take my kerchief.

WILL:

What for?

REBECCA:

Take my kerchief and wipe your forehead.

WILL:

Thank you, Miss Rebecca.

REBECCA:

If you're feeling ill for any reason, you may sit down. You need not be so formal.

WILL:

I'll remain standin', if it's the same to you.

REBECCA:

Well, it's not the same to me; I wish you to be seated.

WILL:

The whims of a guest should be humored.

REBECCA:

Sit down, Lieutenant.

WILL:

Really, Miss Rebecca, whether I sit or stand--

REBECCA:

Sit down!

WILL:

(BEAT, RELUCTANTLY) I'm afraid you'll have to help me. I - I can't manage it by myself.

REBECCA:

(ASTONISHED) Why, you - you are wounded?

WILL:

Yes.

REBECCA:

Put your arm around my shoulder. (NO RESPONSE, INSISTENT) Your arm around my shoulder, sir! Carefully, Lieutenant.

SFX:

REBECCA HELPS WILL TO SIT ON MATTRESS

WILL:

(GROANS AS HE SITS, THEN WITH EFFORT) I'm not nearly so arrogant at this moment, am I?

REBECCA:

(APOLOGETIC) I - I called you a liar.

WILL:

You haven't been altogether wrong. I was sent here to keep you under surveillance. Oh, I resisted the assignment; I asked the colonel to send somebody else. But it's funny. Now I begin to welcome the assignment -- just when I'm bein' sent away.

REBECCA:

You're - you're leaving?

WILL:

You should be pleased to be done with me.

REBECCA:

But you're in no condition to travel.

WILL:

They'll put me in a wagon. Others are worse off than me.

REBECCA:

Oh, yes, I - I know.

WILL:

(SLOWLY) Oh, Miss Rebecca-- Those Virginia men and Carolina men, they're fightin' for the honor of the South -- and they do what they have to do. Please -- remember them. And, while I've no right to ask it, will ya - remember me, too?

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

SFX:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) Will, do you believe in Fate? That all things are preordained? Perhaps it was preordained that, less than two days after you left Winchester, I was informed I had a visitor. An unexpected visitor. [X]

MOTHER:

It's Junius, the vegetable peddler. He's come through the lines from Millwood. Got some truly fine vegetables for you. Says you ordered them specially. He's waiting for you in the kitchen.

REBECCA:

Oh? Well, I'll see him.

SFX:

REBECCA'S FOOTSTEPS TO KITCHEN DOOR WHICH OPENS ... THEN CLOSES BEHIND--

REBECCA:

Oh, good morning, Junius.

JUNIUS:

Good mornin', ma'am. I got somethin' for ya.

REBECCA:

I'm afraid I don't understand.

JUNIUS:

Wrapped in this here foil. Been carryin' it in my mouth. I was told to bring it to you.

REBECCA:

By whom?

JUNIUS:

General Phil Sheridan, the United States Army. He say to me, "Junius, you take this message to Miss Rebecca Wright."

REBECCA:

Why me?

JUNIUS:

General Crook done told General Sheridan you was a loyal lady -- faithful and loyal to the government of the United States. Now, that's you, ain't it?

REBECCA:

Yes.

SFX:

CRINKLE OF FOIL

JUNIUS:

Then this message is for you.

REBECCA:

(BEAT) I - I refuse to accept it.

JUNIUS:

Why?

REBECCA:

Why not? You got your money for bringin' it, didn't you?

JUNIUS:

Ma'am, some things a person can't take money for. I like being alive too much to risk my life just for money. Ain't much of a life, I admit, but it's my life.

REBECCA:

Please forgive me, Junius. I don't want the message.

JUNIUS:

I risked my life to bring it.

REBECCA:

You want me to risk my life reading it?

JUNIUS:

I do, ma'am.

REBECCA:

Well, you have no right to want that.

JUNIUS:

Not me, ma'am. General Phil Sheridan, the United States Army. He wants that. (BEAT, UNDERSTANDING) I won't hurry. I'll come by again this evening.

MUSIC:

CURTAIN ... [COMMERCIAL OMITTED] THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

ANNOUNCER:

Tonight on THE CAVALCADE OF AMERICA, Diana Lynn is starring as Rebecca Wright in "Loyal Lady." Miss Rebecca is writing a letter.

SFX:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) You cannot imagine how deep my concern was, my dear Will, following that fateful interview with Junius. (SIGHS) What did General Sheridan want of me?

As the day wore on, I thought of many, many things. I thought of our traditions, of the causes at stake, Confederacy and the Union. But most of all, Will, in my secret heart, my thoughts began to be more and more with you. Strange -- because it was then that Mother called to me. [X]

MOTHER:

(OFF, CALLS) Rebecca?! I have a letter!

SFX:

MOTHER'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

REBECCA:

A letter from Will? For me?

MOTHER:

(CLOSER) From Will, but addressed to me.

REBECCA:

Oh.

MOTHER:

It concerns you. Shall I read it, dear?

REBECCA:

Yes, if you want to.

SFX:

UNFOLDS LETTER

MOTHER:

(READS) "My dear Mrs. Wright, I have known Miss Rebecca for only a short time -- too short, perhaps, for what I'm about to say. But this is a time of war and events and emotions move terribly fast when life itself is daily in the balance. One day, I will return to your house to speak for Rebecca. Meanwhile, I adjure you, Mrs. Wright, to see that your daughter does nothing which might injure the cause which you and I hold so dear. Faithfully, Will Rutherford." (TO REBECCA) Now, what does the lieutenant mean?

REBECCA:

It's quite plain, Mother. He's asking for my hand.

MOTHER:

But what else does he mean?

REBECCA:

Well, isn't it obvious? Will Rutherford left Winchester with Kershaw's infantry to reinforce General Lee's army in Richmond. Now, perhaps he's worried because I knew these things.

MOTHER:

Well, I have no idea what you're talking about. All that matters is -- are you fond of him?

REBECCA:

Well -- how can I tell? Can a woman know such things in a few days?

MOTHER:

Many women know. I knew.

REBECCA:

(QUIETLY) All right. Yes. Yes, I believe I could be fond of him.

MOTHER:

Even fond enough to become his wife?

REBECCA:

Perhaps.

MOTHER:

Oh, that would give me great joy. Rebecca, do nothing that will build a wall between you and Will.

REBECCA:

He has put on the uniform of the Confederacy. That's a wall of his construction.

MOTHER:

But he's a man; he follows his duty.

REBECCA:

Well, I'm a woman. Does a woman have no duties? Will Rutherford wears his uniform; I must wear my uniform and be free to choose my cause and to serve it. (WITH DIFFICULTY) If Will considers me less his equal because of it, I - I shall not want him.

MOTHER:

Well, my daughter, you can sound very persuasive.

REBECCA:

(DRY) Except to myself. (SERIOUS) Oh, Mother, why must people be forced to make a choice?

MOTHER:

Because that's the only way they become people. Without choice, there's nothing -- neither love nor virtue, nor self-respect.

REBECCA:

(UNHAPPY) All right, Mother. For the sake of my self-respect, I'll make my choice.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SFX:

JUNIUS' MULE-DRAWN VEGETABLE CART ROLLS DOWN THE STREET

JUNIUS:

(HALF-SINGS, HALF-YELLS) I got veggy-tables! I got rutabagas! Got onions! Nice, fat--!

REBECCA:

(CALLS) Good evening, Junius!

SFX:

VEGETABLE CART STOPS BEHIND--

JUNIUS:

(CALLS) Good evenin', ma'am! (CONVERSATIONAL) Would you care for any nice veggy-table tonight?

REBECCA:

Yes, yes. You can bring them into the kitchen.

JUNIUS:

(LOW) Oh, I think I better not, ma'am. Patrols out tonight, all over Winchester, lookin' for somethin'. I sure hope it ain't me. (BEAT, BUSINESSLIKE) Miss Rebecca, I bear a message for you from General Phil Sheridan, the United States Army.

REBECCA:

I - I'm ready to read it.

JUNIUS:

Thank you, ma'am -- 'cause this here tin-foil sure do give a man the sore mouth.

REBECCA:

(CHUCKLES)

JUNIUS:

If you'll hold on just a--

CAPTAIN:

(OFF) Good evening, Miss Rebecca!

REBECCA:

(LOW, QUICK) Junius, it's a patrol; careful!

SFX:

CAPTAIN'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

REBECCA:

(UP, FRIENDLY) Good evening, Captain. It's a charming evening.

CAPTAIN:

(APPROACHES) All citizens are supposed to be in their houses after sundown.

REBECCA:

Oh, yes, Captain, I know. But, uh, but Junius here was passin' by with some fresh vegetables and I - I just couldn't resist buying some. You do forgive me, Captain, don't you?

CAPTAIN:

Maybe. (TURNS TO JUNIUS) You're -- Junius?

JUNIUS:

(NERVOUS, SWALLOWS HARD, CHOKES ON FOIL)

CAPTAIN:

Speak up. Can't you talk?

JUNIUS:

I had somethin' in my throat, sir.

CAPTAIN:

(SUSPICIOUS) Sergeant, hold up your lantern. Have a good look at this man.

SERGEANT:

Yes, sir.

SFX:

STEPS FORWARD, RAISES AND OPENS METAL LANTERN

CAPTAIN:

Your name?

JUNIUS:

Junius, sir.

CAPTAIN:

Occupation?

JUNIUS:

I sell vegetables. Been sellin' 'em in Winchester since I was a boy.

CAPTAIN:

You always sell your produce at this hour?

JUNIUS:

No, sir.

CAPTAIN:

Why are you out, then?

JUNIUS:

Goin' home to Millwood, sir. Had to pass by this way.

REBECCA:

Yes, Captain, and I stopped him.

CAPTAIN:

(SATISFIED) All right, Sergeant, come along.

SFX:

FOOTSTEPS OF CAPTAIN AND SERGEANT MOVE OFF

CAPTAIN:

(MOVING OFF) Evenin', Miss Rebecca.

REBECCA:

Evenin', Captain. (BEAT, LOW, TO JUNIUS) Quick, Junius, give me the message.

JUNIUS:

I can't, Miss Rebecca.

REBECCA:

You can't?

JUNIUS:

No'm, I just swallowed it. ...

REBECCA:

Can - can you remember what it said?

JUNIUS:

I think so, ma'am. General Sheridan want to know if you could tell him how many troops General Early have and where they is now.

REBECCA:

Junius, tell me something.

JUNIUS:

Yes'm?

REBECCA:

If - if Confederate troops left Winchester to go somewhere else, would that news be important to General Sheridan?

JUNIUS:

Yes, ma'am, I reckon it. Miss Rebecca, is there somethin' you want to tell General Sheridan?

REBECCA:

Yes, Junius. Yes, there is. Now, listen. General Kershaw's division has been detached from Winchester. At this moment, it's marching toward Front Royal by way of Chester Gap.

JUNIUS:

(EXCITED) Marchin' where?

REBECCA:

To Richmond, to join General Lee.

JUNIUS:

How you know this?

REBECCA:

It doesn't matter how I know. I think General Sheridan will want the information.

JUNIUS:

He'll want proof, ma'am. How sure is you?

REBECCA:

(TEARFUL) As sure as I know that, to defend my country, I betray a man who loves me.

JUNIUS:

(UNDERSTANDS, SYMPATHETIC) Miss Rebecca, it ain't nothin' good in this whole wide world that don't have its cost of pain. (CLICKS TONGUE, TO MULE) Come on, mule! Let's go!

SFX:

VEGETABLE CART HURRIES OFF

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG

SFX:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) It's better for you to know everything, Will, just as it happened.

General Sheridan received my news that General Early's army had been weakened by the withdrawal of Kershaw's infantry. So, on September nineteenth, his army began to move into the Shenandoah Valley.

Well, you know what happened then, Will.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR A PORTENTOUS IMPRESSION OF A UNION VICTORY ... THEN OUT AT [X]

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) And, afterwards, on September twentieth, General Sheridan came to this house. [X]

SHERIDAN:

Miss Rebecca, this message has just been delivered. It belongs to you as much as it does to me.

REBECCA:

May I?

SHERIDAN:

Please.

SFX:

SHERIDAN HANDS PAPER TO REBECCA

REBECCA:

(READS) "Have just heard of your great victory. God bless you all, officers and men. Signed, A. Lincoln."

SHERIDAN:

My dear, this is an important day. After today, Confederate armies will no longer threaten the nation's capital at Washington. There will be no more raids across the Maryland and Pennsylvania borders. The tide has turned, and you have helped to turn it.

REBECCA:

Well, your words are very kind, General. But, at this moment, I think only of a wounded Confederate soldier on his way to Richmond.

SHERIDAN:

I've been told about Lieutenant Rutherford. Do you think you have - lost him?

REBECCA:

I know I have, sir.

SHERIDAN:

You are wrong, my dear. He is no more lost to you than the South is lost to the United States of America.

REBECCA:

I will pray you are right.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

SFX:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

REBECCA:

(NARRATES) And so, Will my dear, I conclude this letter. I shall not ask your forgiveness. I have done what I consider to be my duty. And whatever has passed between us is done, just as whatever has passed between North and South is also done.

The American people make a new beginning from this day. [X]

Shall we?

I wait for you, Will.

Faithfully,

Rebecca.

MUSIC:

MELANCHOLY, TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

Our thanks to Diana Lynn and the Cavalcade Players for tonight's DuPont play, "Loyal Lady."

[COMMERCIAL OMITTED]

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... OUT BEHIND--

ANNOUNCER:

Next week, the DuPont Cavalcade will present the star of Broadway and Hollywood, Robert Cummings. Our play, "Navy Blue," is an action-packed drama from the heroic pages of United States naval history. Be sure to listen.

MUSIC:

IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

Tonight's DuPont Cavalcade "Loyal Lady," starring Diana Lynn, was written by Morton Wishengrad. Will Rutherford was played by Chester Stratton. Diana Lynn is now appearing in "The People Against O'Hara," photographed for M-G-M on DuPont's "Superior 2" motion picture film by John Alton, A.S.C. Music for tonight's CAVALCADE OF AMERICA was composed by Arden Cornwell, conducted by Donald Voorhis. The program was directed by John Zoller. This is Cy Harrice speaking.

2ND ANNCR:

Ladies and gentlemen, at its thirty-first annual convention in Miami Beach, Florida last week, the American Legion Auxiliary announced its radio awards as a result of an annual listening poll, to determine, as the Legion Auxiliary says, the best type and quality of program and of outstanding service to American radio listeners. We are happy and proud that for the second consecutive year THE CAVALCADE OF AMERICA has received this radio award of the American Legion Auxiliary. Thank you.

MUSIC:

DRUM ROLL ... CAVALCADE THEME

2ND ANNCR:

Don't forget next week. Our star, Robert Cummings. Our play, "Navy Blue." The DuPont CAVALCADE OF AMERICA comes to you from the Belasco Theatre in New York and is sponsored by the DuPont Company of Wilmington, Delaware -- Makers of Better Things for Better Living through Chemistry.

SFX:

APPLAUSE

MUSIC:

OUT

NBC ANNCR:

Next, it's HOLLYWOOD THEATER on NBC.

MUSIC:

NBC CHIMES