Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Grand Central Station
Show: Miracle for Christmas
Date: Dec 24 1949

Miracle for Christmas
Dec 24 1949

SOUND:

LOCOMOTIVE RUMBLES DOWN TRACK, WHISTLE BLOWS ... OUT FOR

NARRATOR:

From New York! Pillsbury's Best Enriched Flour brings you--

VOICE:

(MAJESTIC ECHO) Grand - Central - Station!

SOUND:

LOCOMOTIVE RUMBLES DOWN TRACK, WHISTLE BLOWS, BELLS RINGS ... ALL OUT EXCEPT BELLS FOR:

2ND VOICE (SONOVOX EFFECT) All aboard - for modern baking! - You're on the right track - with Pillsbury - Greatest Name in Flour!

SOUND:

LOCOMOTIVE RUMBLES DOWN TRACK, WHISTLE BLOWS, BELLS RINGS ... IN BG ... IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING:

NARRATOR:

As a bullet seeks its target, shining rails in every part of our great country are aimed at Grand Central Station, heart of the nation's greatest city. Drawn by the magnetic force of the fantastic metropolis, day and night, great trains rush toward the Hudson River, sweep down its eastern bank for one hundred and forty miles, flash briefly by the long red row of tenement houses south of 125th street, dive with a roar into the two-and-one-half mile tunnel which burrows beneath the glitter and swank of Park Avenue, and then--

SOUND:

TRAIN BRAKES, ENTERS STATION ... CROWD NOISE ... IN BG

NARRATOR:

Grand Central Station! Crossroads of a million private lives! Gigantic stage on which are played a thousand dramas daily!

SOUND:

OUT

MUSIC:

THEME ... ALFRED NEWMAN'S "STREET SCENE" ... THEN IN BG

NARRATOR:

Now, for the sixth consecutive year, Pillsbury Mills of Minneapolis presents with pride Grand Central Station's traditional Christmas play, a drama you will long remember.

MUSIC:

OUT

DRAKE:

This is Galen Drake, and before we get into our Christmas story, I want to say just a word about the three top prize-winning recipes in Pillsbury's Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest. The grand prize was awarded for a recipe for Pillsbury's fifty-thousand-dollar No-Knead Water-Rising Twists. The second prize of ten thousand dollars was for Starlight Mint Surprise Cookies. And the third prize of four thousand dollars was for a chocolate cake, Aunt Carrie's Bonbon Cake. Now, there's sixty-four thousand dollars worth of prize-winning recipes. Recipes won with Pillsbury's Best flour. Now, as you know, you'll always bake your best with Pillsbury's Best and - and we have those three recipes ready for you now and we'll be glad to send 'em to you. You just drop a penny postcard to Ann Pillsbury, Prize Recipe Department, Minneapolis 2, Minnesota, and she'll send you your copy. Ann Pillsbury, Prize Recipe Department, Minneapolis 2, Minnesota.

MUSIC HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN INTRO ... THEN ORGAN PLAYS "SILENT NIGHT" IN BG

NARRATOR:

After the train from Albany pulled in, no one, not a single person actually saw the young man with soft brown hair and soft brown eyes come through the gate. Still unseen, he walks the length of the great waiting room, now strangely tranquil as travel ebbs on Christmas Eve. Quietly, he goes out the door, down the street, and then up the broad marble stairs of the hospital.

MUSIC HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN ACCENT ... THEN OUT

NARRATOR:

When the girl at the switchboard turns to him...

GIRL:

What can I do for you sir?

NARRATOR:

Without saying a word, he gives her a card.

GIRL:

(GASPS)

NARRATOR:

She's startled by the name on it and instantly announces him to the hospital superintendent.

SOUND:

INTERCOM CLICKS

GIRL:

Dr. Mason is here to see you.

GARRETT:

(FILTER) Mason? Dr. Mason who applied for an internship?

GIRL:

Yes, Dr. Garrett, it is Dr. Mason from Albany.

GARRETT:

(FILTER) But that-- But that's impossible!

GIRL:

Shall I ask him about the telegram?

GARRETT:

(FILTER) No, no. No. No, I'll do it. Send him in, please.

GIRL:

Yes, sir.

SOUND:

INTERCOM CLICKS

GIRL:

Uh, Dr. Garrett will see you, sir. First door to the left.

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR WHICH OPENS

MUSIC HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN ACCENT ... THEN ORGAN, IN BG

SOUND:

DOOR CLOSES, FOOTSTEPS IN

MASON: (FLAWLESS, VERY SQUARE) Dr. Garrett?

GARRETT:

Dr. Mason?

MUSIC ORGAN STING, FOR AN ACCENT

GARRETT:

You are Dr. Mason?

MUSIC AN ACCENT ... THEN OUT

MASON:

I'm sorry that I was delayed, Dr. Garrett.

GARRETT:

Well, I-- Well, just ten minutes ago, I--

MASON:

Yes. Ten minutes ago you received a telegram.

GARRETT:

Why, that's right. From your mother.

MASON:

I know.

GARRETT:

But, man, I-- Why, look at it.

SOUND:

TELEGRAM UNFOLDED

GARRETT:

It says that you--

MASON:

That I was killed. Do you mind if I tear up that telegram, Dr. Garrett?

SOUND:

TELEGRAM TORN UP

GARRETT:

Well, I - I don't understand. I - I was so unnerved by that wire. I - I counted so much on your being here tonight -- Christmas Eve, a night always busy with calls.

MASON:

You are short of interns?

GARRETT:

Oh, yes. Mason, these are the slums. Walk through block after block and you won't see a doctor's shingle. Not one. The people here are too poor. They know only one healer, the intern and his ambulance.

MASON:

And tonight -- night of mercy and good will -- they would have cried out in vain.

GARRETT:

Well, now that you've come, I won't have to say to the suffering:

MUSIC:

AN ACCENT, THEN IN BG

GARRETT:

"Wait! Wait! There's only one ambulance tonight and that's out on a call. Wait and suffer. I have no one to send to you because Dr. Mason was killed!"

MUSIC:

AN ACCENT, THEN OUT

GARRETT:

(SIGH OF RELIEF) Ah, it's good that you're here, Mason. It - it's good.

SOUND:

SCRIBBLED WRITING ON PAPER

MASON:

It's good to be here, Dr. Garrett.

GARRETT:

Well, you better get started.

SOUND:

PAPER TORN FROM PAD, HANDED TO MASON

GARRETT:

Take this slip down to the storeroom; see that they give you a warm sheepskin coat ...

MASON:

Thank you.

GARRETT:

... and a pair of mittens. From there, you go to the ambulance room. I'll have your driver waiting for you. His name is Mac. (FADES OUT)

MAC:

(FADES IN) My name is Mac. The chief says I drive your crate tonight.

MASON:

Crate?

MAC:

Crate, jalopy, sick buggy, am-boo-lance -- take your pick.

MASON:

Oh. I see what you mean.

MAC:

Heh! You green interns, you're all the same. The first time you spy our am-boo-lance your eyes pop wide -- like you seen a heavenly chariot or somethin'. Not me. I've been drivin' this old baby for eight rotten years!

MASON: An ambulance, Mac, is a sacred thing. It is a chariot of mercy.

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

MAC:

Uh oh. Two bells. That's us. Come on, Mason. That's your first call.

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Two-three-four South Street.

SOUND: TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Two-three-four South Street.

SOUND: TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Two-three-four South Street.

SOUND: BELL CLANGS ... AMBULANCE ENGINE STARTS, ROARS, DRIVES OFF ... ENGINE CONTINUES IN BG

MAC:

Look, pal, help me out by watchin' out for cars cuttin' into the cross streets. We don't stop for no red lights.

SOUND:

TIRES SCREECH ... BELL CLANGS ... ENGINE AND OTHER TRAFFIC NOISE CONTINUES IN BG

MAC:

(YELLS, UPSET) Look, Doc, what did I tell you?! Watch it or we'll both be killed! Holy cow, you new interns, you're all alike -- you're always dreamin'! You put on the white coat and pants and your head goes up in the clouds!

MASON:

Why are you so bitter, Mac?

MAC:

Why shouldn't I be bitter? If it wasn't for you, I'd be home with the wife right now.

MASON:

You truly believe that only because of me--?

MAC:

Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! If you hadn't showed up, this am-boo-lance 'ud be parked in the garage, for cryin' out loud! I woulda had the night off like on a decent job.

MASON:

To you, driving an ambulance is just a job like any other?

MAC:

Yeah, nothin' but.

SOUND:

TIRES SCREECH, IN BG

MAC:

Boy, will I be glad when this shift is over.

MASON:

But, Mac. This is Christmas Eve.

MAC:

You're tellin' me!

MASON:

This is one night, at least, you could forget that driving an ambulance is - a "job." This one night you could look upon it as - an errand of mercy.

SOUND:

POLICE WHISTLE, IN BG

MAC:

An errand of mercy? Hah! You know where we're goin'?

MASON:

To help someone afflicted.

MAC:

Afflicted! Afflicted with alcohol, you mean. I'll give ya two to one we're makin' a stew call.

MASON:

Stew call?

MAC:

Yeah, Mason.

SOUND:

TIRES SCREECH, IN BG

MAC:

We're riskin' our necks, tearin' through traffic, to give some drunk a whiff o' smellin' salts.

MASON:

Any man who cries out for help -- whether he be brimful of drink or empty of blood -- his call shall be answered.

MAC:

Yeah. Says you!

SOUND:

AMBULANCE SCREECHES TO HALT, BELL RINGS, CROWD NOISE, AMBULANCE DOORS OPEN AND CLOSE

MAC:

Come on, Mason, make it snappy. We ain't got all night.

SOUND:

CROWD NOISE UP FOR A MOMENT, THEN IN BG

MAC:

What did I tell ya? No-good drunk. Here's your bag, Doc.

MASON:

Thank you, Mac. I won't need it.

MAC:

But he's out cold, Mason. Come on, give him a whiff o' the stuff, quick, and we blow.

MASON:

Quiet, Mac.

MUSIC:

HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN ACCENT ... HARP CONTINUES IN BG

MASON:

Come now. Open your eyes, sir.

MAC:

(LAUGHS) Ha ha! He calls the drunk "Sir"!

SOUND:

SOME IN THE CROWD LAUGH

MAC:

Look, Mason. Here's the spirit of ammonia. Hold it under his nose, will ya? Heh heh, that always wakes 'em up.

MASON:

Quiet, Mac.

DRUNK:

(GASPS AND GROANS, REGAINING CONSCIOUSNESS)

MASON:

Come, sir. Open your eyes.

MAC:

(BITTERLY IRONIC) That's right, Mason. You just talk pretty to him and he'll open his eyes.

DRUNK:

Where--? Where am I?

SOUND:

SOME IN THE CROWD LAUGH

VOICE:

(OFF, AMUSED) "Where am I?" he says.

DRUNK:

Why is everybody laughing? What's the matter?

MASON:

Nothing. Nothing. Just put your arm around my shoulder.

DRUNK:

(STRUGGLES)

MASON:

That's it. Now. Let me help you to stand up straight.

DRUNK:

(STRUGGLES)

MASON:

There. Now. You feel better?

MUSIC:

HARP ... UP AND OUT

VOICE:

(OFF, SURPRISED) Whaddya know?

DRUNK:

Why, I--! Suddenly, I - I feel all right. I feel fine. My head is so clear.

MASON:

Of course, of course. All you needed was to stand on your own two feet. To be strong. Be of good cheer.

DRUNK:

Gosh, Doc, that's sure wonderful medicine you give me.

MAC:

Ah, so what kind of gag you pullin'? He didn't give you no medicine. There was nothin' the matta with you. You toss off a beer and you lay down on the street like you're out cold and we waste an am-boo-lance on ya. I got a mind t' take a poke at ya.

MASON:

That'll be enough, Mac. Tell me, sir. What is your name?

DRUNK:

(RELUCTANT) Well, if - if it's all the same to you--

MAC:

Come on, come on, come on, come on. Give him your name. He's gotta make out his report.

DRUNK:

Pete Lantin, Doctor.

SOUND:

SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER

MASON:

Peter, you won't lose faith again. You will stand up. Self-reliant. And you will face life courageously. And with new hope.

SOUND:

AMBULANCE ENGINE STARTS

MAC:

(OFF) Come on, Mason, we ain't got all night! Let's get goin'!

DRUNK:

Doc! Doc!

MASON:

(OFF) Yes, Peter?

MUSIC:

ORGAN SNEAKS IN

DRUNK:

A - a Merry Christmas to ya, Doc!

MASON:

(OFF) Thank you, sir.

SOUND:

AMBULANCE DRIVES OFF, BELL RINGING

MUSIC:

ORGAN UP FULL, FOR A TRANSITION, THEN OUT WITH A HARP GLISSANDO

GARRETT:

Dr. Mason?! Dr. Mason, I'd like to speak to you!

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS IN HALLWAY ... BRIEFLY

MASON:

Yes?

GARRETT:

Mason, Mac tells me you didn't even open your bag on your first call.

MASON:

No. It wasn't necessary.

GARRETT:

Well, now, don't misunderstand me, Mason, I - I can't begin to tell you how thankful I am that you're with us this evening, but, ah--

MASON:

But, from now on, I'm not to use suggestion?

GARRETT:

Or - whatever it was you did use. Please follow standard materia medica in treating your cases. We-- You're - you're not offended?

MASON:

Of course not.

GARRETT:

Well, that's fine, Dr. Mason. That--

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

GARRETT:

Oh, that's your call again.

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Nineteen Water Street. Third floor

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Nineteen Water Street. Third floor

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Nineteen Water Street. Third floor

SOUND:

BELL CLANGS ... AMBULANCE ENGINE STARTS, ROARS, DRIVES OFF ... ENGINE AND TRAFFIC NOISE CONTINUES IN BG

MASON:

Well, Mac, you seem to be good at guessing. You were right the last time. What sort of call is this one going to be?

MAC:

There's no guessin' -- it's experience! This time it's no drunk.

MASON:

Oh? What do you think it is?

MAC:

A birth. Or maybe a death.

MASON:

Christmas Eve. And someone is to live or die? It is better that one should live on Christmas Eve. Mac, let it be a birth we're going to.

SOUND:

POLICE WHISTLE, TIRES SCREECH, IN BG

MAC:

No difference to me, Doc; a birth or a death. I just drive.

SOUND:

AMBULANCE BELL CLANGS, IN BG

MASON:

How long have you been doing it, Mac?

MAC:

Huh? Oh. Like I told ya, eight rotten years -- that's how long.

MASON:

What you call eight "rotten" years were truly eight glorious years, filled with service to your fellow men--

MAC:

Cut the chatter, Mason. This is it. Number nineteen. This red brick house, upstairs.

SOUND:

AMBULANCE SCREECHES TO HALT, ENGINE OUT, AMBULANCE DOORS OPEN AND CLOSE

MAC:

Come on, make it snappy. It's third floor rear.

SOUND:

HURRIED FOOTSTEPS INTO BUILDING AND UP WOODEN STAIRS

MAN:

(DISTRAUGHT, OFF) Doctor! Doctor! Here! Up here!

MAC:

Keep ya shirt on, we're comin'!

SOUND:

HURRIED FOOTSTEPS TO DISTRAUGHT MAN

MAN:

(SOBBING) Even if you hurry--! Doctor! (CONTINUES TO CRY, IN BG)

MASON:

Tears on Christmas Eve, young man?

MAN:

I'm - I'm afraid you're too late!

MAC:

Uh huh. If you thought it'd be a birth, you're wrong, Mason. It sure looks like--

MASON:

Wait, Mac. Don't say it.

MUSIC:

ORGAN ... "SILENT NIGHT" ... IN BG

MASON:

(COMFORTING, TO THE MAN) Now, now. Perhaps we're not too late.

MASON:

Tell me, how is the mother?

MAN:

(CRYING) She's all right. But our baby--!

MASON:

Yes, your baby?

MAN:

Crippled. Terribly crippled. I-- We prayed for our child to be born on Christmas Eve. We - we thought we'd be so happy tonight! (MORE CRYING)

MUSIC:

OUT

SOUND:

CHURCH BELL TOLLS NINE O'CLOCK, IN BG

MASON:

Come now. Come. No tears. Not on Christmas Eve. I'll have a look at the infant. (MOVING OFF) Wait here.

SOUND:

MASON'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY ... DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS

MAC:

(CALLS AFTER HIM) Make it snappy, Mason! Doc Garrett's always nervous when all the am-boo-lances are out. (TO HIMSELF) Eh, it's only nine o'clock!

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS ... MASON'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

MUSIC:

HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN ACCENT ... ORGAN, IN BG

BABY:

(CRIES, IN BG)

MAC:

Hey, what's the idea o' bringin' the kid out here?!

MAN:

(NO LONGER CRYING) Oh! Let - let me hold him, Doctor. Please.

MASON:

Of course. There. There you are.

BABY: (STARTS TO COO HAPPILY, IN BG)

MASON:

Ah-ha-ha. The child knows his father.

MAN:

Yes. He knows me. He knows me. But he'll hate me - when he's old enough to realize that--

MUSIC:

AN ACCENT, THEN OUT

MAN:

(WHISPERS IN DISBELIEF) Doctor!

MASON:

Yes?

MAN:

His arms! His arms!

MAC:

What about the kid's arms?

MAN:

They're straight! Straight as arrows!

MAC:

So what?

MAN:

But - but, before, they were terribly twisted. Both his arms were terribly crippled.

BABY:

(COOS HAPPILY)

MASON:

You can see for yourself the child is normal.

MAN:

But, but I tell you, before, when I looked at-- I swear they were twisted. And - and now--

MASON:

You were under great tension. Perhaps your imagination--

BABY:

(CRIES A LITTLE IN BG)

MAN:

(BETWEEN SOBS) Yes. Yes. Yes. Oh, my little son! Aren't his tiny fingers - so tiny?

MASON:

(GENTLE CHUCKLE) Now, go in and tell your wife truthfully that her baby is normal in every way. Show her.

MAN:

Yes. Yes.

MASON:

You both looked forward to a happy Christmas Eve. It is. Remember, tears are not for Christmas Eve.

BABY:

(INSTANTLY STOPS CRYING)

MAC:

(BRIEFLY STARTLED BY BABY'S QUIET) Hey. (HIS OLD SELF) Aw, come on, Mason. Forget all that good fairy stuff. This fella's hopped up enough as is. Let's go.

MASON:

Yes, Mac.

MAN:

Oh, Doctor?

MASON:

Yes?

MUSIC:

ORGAN SNEAKS IN ... "THE FIRST NOEL"

MAN:

(TEARFUL) A - a merry - merry Christmas, Doctor.

MASON:

Thank you. A merry Christmas to you, sir.

MUSIC:

ORGAN "THE FIRST NOEL" ... FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN OUT

GARRETT:

Mason! Dr. Mason!

MASON:

Yes, Dr. Garrett? You've been looking for me?

GARRETT:

Yes, I--

SOUND:

ONE CHIME, IN BG

VOICE:

(FILTERED, IN BG) Four-seven-one Orchard Street.

SOUND:

ONE CHIME, IN BG

VOICE:

(FILTERED, IN BG) Four-seven-one Orchard Street.

MASON:

(OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) Oh. Only one bell. Go on, Dr. Garrett.

GARRETT:

Well, I must speak to you, Mason. About - about the telegram.

MASON:

Yes?

GARRETT:

The telegram which said that Dr. Mason was killed. The one you said was a mistake.

MASON:

Did I, Dr. Garrett?

GARRETT:

I've just spoken to the sender of that telegram. I have just finished talking to Dr. Mason's mother on the long-distance telephone.

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES, IN BG

VOICE:

(FILTERED, IN BG) Three-seven Summer Street.

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES, IN BG

VOICE:

(FILTERED, IN BG) Three-seven Summer Street.

MASON:

(OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) That's my call. (MOVING OFF) I'm sorry, I must go, Doctor.

GARRETT:

Now, wait! Wait, man, wait! I want to talk to you! Listen to me, please! Dr. Mason was killed! Do you hear? Three hours before you walked into my office, he was killed while driving to the Albany railroad station! And his mother saw him die!

SOUND:

BELL CLANGS ... AMBULANCE ENGINE STARTS, ROARS, DRIVES OFF ... ENGINE AND TRAFFIC NOISE CONTINUES IN BG

MASON:

Well, Mac. What is this call going to be?

MAC:

(UNEASY) I, ah--

MASON:

A birth? Or a death?

MAC:

I don't know, Mason, but I don't - I don't like this one. There's - there's - there's something about this call that gimme a funny chill all of a sudden.

MASON:

Because - it's in your neighborhood?

MAC:

Huh? Wha--? What do you think this call is gonna be?

MASON:

(INSISTENT) Because it is your wife?

MAC:

Ellie?

MASON:

Is this job a "rotten" job, Mac, now that you can rush a doctor to her side? Is this ambulance still a crate, now that it's speeding to answer your own wife's cry of pain?

MAC:

Stop that kind of talk, will ya? You're tryin' to make me think somethin's happened to Ellie! I ain't afraid! I'll say it again! Yeah, drivin' this crate is still a job and a bum one at that!

MASON:

And the eight years?

MAC:

Rotten years! Wasted years! Coulda had my own garage and repair business; I'd be in the chips today 'stead o'--

MASON:

Yes, you would have made more money.

MAC:

'Stead o' riskin' my neck, drivin' all night, twistin' in and out o' el pillars, skiddin' on slippery car tracks.

MASON:

Why, Mac? Why did you do it?

MAC:

How many times I gotta tell ya that nothin' in this whole cockeyed world coulda kept me sittin' back o' this wheel -- except my wife. If it wasn't for Ellie, I--

SOUND:

TIRES SQUEAL AS AMBULANCE SUDDENLY SLOWS BUT KEEPS GOING

MASON:

What's the matter, Mac?

MAC:

Aw, nothin', I guess. That house we just passed, that was ours. And the, uh, the lights are out.

MASON:

Is that unusual?

MAC:

(TRIES TO DISMISS IT) Ahh, naw. It just means Ellie ain't home. She - she, ah, she's probably gone down to the corner as far as the drug store. Yeah! Ellie walks the dog there, every night about this time - and - and--

MASON:

Yes, Mac?

MAC:

(REALIZES) The call we're goin' to -- is that drug store.

MASON:

Yes, Mac.

MAC:

Mason, you got a hunch what it is, tell me what it is!

MASON:

It is not a birth, Mac.

SOUND:

AMBULANCE SCREECHES TO HALT, BELL RINGS, CROWD NOISE, AMBULANCE DOORS OPEN

MAC:

(DESPERATE) Let me through! Let me through! I gotta--! Ellie! Ellie! (TO MASON) It's Ellie! Mason, do somethin'! Ya gotta do somethin'! Please! Please!!

MASON:

We will take her to the hospital, Mac.

MUSIC:

ORGAN AND HARP ... FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG

SOUND:

ONE CHIME

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Eight-twelve East River Road.

SOUND:

ONE CHIME

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Eight-one-two East River Road.

SOUND:

ONE CHIME

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Eight-one-two East River Road.

MASON:

(OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE, TO MAC) Come, let's get ready. The next call will be ours.

MAC:

(DISTRAUGHT) Get--? Get ready?

MASON:

Yes. You heard. The other ambulance just went out.

MAC:

(SOBS) Are you crazy? My wife is upstairs in the operatin' room and you expect me to leave the hospital to go out and drive?

MASON:

There are people who need us, Mac. Our work tonight is not yet finished.

MAC:

But Ellie needs me. What do I care about other people?

MASON:

There are people, Mac, who will cry out for help -- as your wife did. We will answer.

MAC:

Not me. I ain't movin'.

MASON:

It is Christmas Eve, Mac.

MAC:

Christmas Eve! What a Christmas present I got! (SOBS)

MUSIC:

OUT

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Six-four West Street.

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Six-four West Street.

SOUND:

TWO CHIMES

VOICE:

(FILTERED) Six-four West Street.

MASON:

(OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) It's our turn, Mac.

MAC:

All right, Mason. But this is my last trip for the night. No, not for the night -- forever! I'm through, do ya hear?! All washed up! For good!

SOUND:

BELL CLANGS ... AMBULANCE ENGINE STARTS, ROARS, DRIVES OFF

MUSIC:

HARP AND ORGAN FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG ... OUT AT [X]

MAC:

(CRYING)

GARRETT:

I'm terribly sorry, Mac. We did the best that we could.

MAC:

Dying? Ellie's - dying?

GARRETT:

She - she asked for you, Mac. Just once. It was while you were out on that West Street call. Then she lapsed into coma.

MAC:

Ellie? [X] Ellie? Isn't there a chance, Doc Garrett?

GARRETT:

I - I doubt it.

MAC:

While I'm out with the crate my wife calls for me and now she's unconscious. Think of others! Think of others, he said, because it's Christmas Eve! What do you gotta say now, Mason?! You took me from her! You made me go out and drive that rotten am-boo-lance while she - she-- (SOBS)

MASON:

You went to help others. To bring aid to the suffering.

MAC:

Lot a consolation that is.

MASON:

Remember how the old woman blessed you, with tears in her eyes?

MAC:

(SOBS) Awww, I can't think o' nothin' - but Ellie's goin'-- (SAVAGE) You with your big ideas and your fine speeches! What do you know about sorrow and suffering?!

MASON:

(HEAVY ECHO) All that there is to know, my son.

MAC:

(GASPS)

MUSIC:

HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN ACCENT

MAC:

(AMAZED) Just - just - just now - when you - when you said that - for a - for a second, you got old! You - you looked more'n a thousand years old.

MUSIC:

ORGAN, FOR AN ACCENT, THEN OUT

MAC:

(TRIES TO DISMISS IT) God. I must be seein' things on account o' Ellie is leavin' me and I'm crazy, crazy with grief and sorrow.

MASON:

Grief and sorrow for you. Yet how much you did to relieve others of that pain.

MAC:

(STAMMERS) It's funny, Mason, but--

MASON:

Yes, Mac?

MAC:

When - when - when you said those words, I - I - I thought o' my eight years. The eight rotten years. And - and - they didn't - they didn't - they didn't seem so bad. Not anymore. Now, I - I - I - I - I kinda like 'em!

MASON:

Sorrow worketh repentance. You should, Mac. You should glory in them. Eight years of bringing a healer, healer to the suffering. Eight years of rushing the torn and the smashed to the hands of the mender.

MAC:

Your - your words. They just - they just - they just take the pain right out o' me. They - they just draw it out.

MASON:

Now that your work for this night is finished, Mac, I will walk home with you.

MAC:

Go home? While Ellie is--? (BREAKS DOWN AND CRIES)

MASON:

Yes.

MAC:

Okay. If you say so, Mason. But for the life o' me, I don't know why I take your word.

MUSIC:

CHURCH BELLS, TRAFFIC NOISE ... FOOTSTEPS ON SIDEWALK, CONTINUES IN BG, OUT AT [X]

MAC:

What a break. What a rotten break I got on Christmas Eve.

MASON:

You love her a great deal, don't you?

MAC:

Yeah.

MASON:

Soon, it will be midnight.

MAC:

(IRONIC) A merry Christmas.

MASON:

How did she greet you each night when you returned from your driving?

MAC:

How did Ellie greet--? [X] Why - why do you ask that, Mason?

MASON:

Tell me, Mac. I want you to say it.

MAC:

Well, she--

MASON:

Tell me.

MAC:

She - she was like a - like a happy, anxious kid. She - she'd go out and put on the porch light. Didn't matter even if the weather was terrible. I used to bawl her out for it; tell her she'd catch pneumonia. But - but she'd always put on the porch light and stand outside there waitin' for-- (SOBS)

MASON:

Waiting for her shining knight returning from his errands of mercy.

MUSIC:

FOOTSTEPS RESUME, CONTINUES IN BG

MAC:

As soon as she'd see me come 'round that next corner, she'd call to me.

MASON:

And now, will you continue your driving?

MAC:

Yeah. I'm - I'm stickin' to it, Mason. Even though Ellie won't be around, I - I'm stickin'.

MASON: This is your corner.

MAC:

Yeah.

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS OUT

MUSIC:

ORGAN, FOR AN ACCENT, BUILDS IN BG

MASON:

Look to your house, my son.

MAC:

(STUNNED) The light! Our porch light, it's on! Mason! You're right! Mason! Mason?!

MUSIC:

SUDDENLY OUT

MAC:

Where are you?!

MASON:

(HEAVY ECHO) Look to your house, my son.

MAC:

(STARTLED GASP)

MUSIC:

HARP GLISSANDO, FOR AN ACCENT ... OUT AT [X]

MAC:

(DISBELIEF) No! It - it can't be!

ELLIE:

(FROM OFF, CALLS CHEERFULLY) Ma-a-ac! M-a-a-ac!

MAC:

It's Ellie! Ellie, darling! It is you!

ELLIE:

(FROM OFF) Mac!

MAC:

(WHISPERS) Thank God! Thank God! [X] And forgive me. I did not know who you were.

MUSIC:

ORGAN AND HARP ... HYMN, "THE LORD'S PRAYER" ... TO A FINISH

NARRATOR:

You have just heard the sixth annual Pillsbury presentation of Grand Central Station's traditional Christmas drama. In a moment, I'll return with the names of the players who gave such an inspired performance.

DRAKE:

This is Galen Drake, bringing you a Christmas greeting from Mr. Philip W. Pillsbury, president of Pillsbury Mills. It reads:

"Throughout the entire world this Christmastide, families are gathered in prayer and festivity. Christmas started when a child was born into a family many centuries ago, and the families of the world have perpetuated the Christmas spirit. Fathers, mothers, sons and daughters -- united always in the hope that "peace on Earth, good will to men," will someday blanket the world. Only when the true spirit of Christmas stays with us every day shall we know the peace on Earth that angels sang about so long ago. I extend a greeting to your family from the people who make up the Pillsbury family; and it's a big family: the farmer who plants the wheat, the employees in our mills and offices, and your grocer, baker, and feed dealer who carry our Pillsbury products. We at Pillsbury hope this Christmas will be a true day of joy. That there will be songs and feasting, a family gathered 'round the table, and a word of prayer. And, above all, the laughter of children,
for it's the children who will keep Christmas always the day of love and understanding. Signed, Philip W. Pillsbury."

NARRATOR:

Our play, "Miracle For Christmas" was written by Jay Bennett. Our stars, Mason Adams as Mac and Ralph Platten as Dr. Mason. Gilbert Mack was featured as the young father, Walter Greaza as Dr. Garrett, Madeleine Pierce as the baby, with the music by Lew White and Burly Mills.

Next week, the tender, affectionate drama of the young reporter whose human interest New Year's story never got printed because, instead of writing it, he lived it. Our cast is headed by the three top featured players of Broadway's smash hit "Death of a Salesman," Cameron Mitchell, Mildred Dunnock, and Howard Smith.

Now, this is your Grand Central station narrator, Ken Roberts, wishing you, for all the Pillsbury folks, a very merry Christmas.

This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.

ANNOUNCER:

Stay tuned for "Stars Over Hollywood." It's one p. m., White Rose Tea time. Feeling droopy? Perk up with White Rose Tea.