Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Mercury Theatre
Show: Sherlock Holmes
Date: Sep 25 1938

Cast of Characters
CBS ANNOUNCER
ANNOUNCER
SHERLOCK HOLMES / ORSON WELLES
DOCTOR WATSON
BILLY, Holmes' trusted boy servant
INSPECTOR FORMAN
LARRABEE, the blackmailer
ALICE FAULKNER
MADGE, Larrabee's wife
PROFESSOR MORIARTY, the Napoleon of crime
BASSICK, one of Moriarty's top agents
CRAIGIN, an assassin
LEARY, one of Craigin's crew
McTAGUE, one of Craigin's crew
PARSONS, Watson's servant
VARIOUS CROWD VOICES

CBS ANNCR:

Texaco Fire Chief dealers from coast to coast will present each Wednesday evening beginning October fifth from 9:30 to 10:30 p. m. Eastern Standard Time, "The Texaco Star Theatre" featuring Adolphe Menjou, Una Merkel, Charlie Ruggles, Jane Froman and Kenny Baker, with Bette Davis as guest star in a dramatic sketch directed by Max Reinhardt, David Broekman's orchestra with Harry Simeone's chorus. Tune in the first broadcast, Wednesday, October fifth, at 9:30 p. m. Eastern Standard Time.

ANNOUNCER:

The Mercury Theatre on the Air!

MUSIC:

THEME (FROM TCHAIKOVSKY'S PIANO CONCERTO, NO. 1) ... CONTINUES IN BG ... FADES OUT BEHIND--

ANNOUNCER:

The Columbia Broadcasting System takes pleasure in bringing you the twelfth in its series of weekly broadcasts featuring Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air. Tonight, Broadway's -- and radio's -- most celebrated theatrical producing company brings to life the best-loved character in detective fiction, the immortal Sherlock Holmes. The play is Orson Welles's own adaptation for radio of William Gillette's enduring melodrama based on the famous stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Before the performance begins, here is the director of the Mercury Theatre, the star and producer of these unique broadcasts, Orson Welles.

WELLES:

Good evening. Well, tonight it's back to Baker Street. Back to that unlikely London of the nineteenth century where high adventure awaits all who would seek it, in a hansom cab or under a gas lamp in an Inverness cape. For tonight we pay tribute to the most wonderful member of that most wonderful world -- a gentleman who never lived, and who will never die.

There are only a few of them, these permanent profiles, everlasting silhouettes on the edge of the world. There is, first, the little hunchback with the slap-stick whose hook nose is shaped like his cap. There is now and always will be the penguin-footed hobo in the derby and the baggy pants. And the small boy with the wooden head. And the long rusty knight on horseback. And the fat knight who could only procure a charge on foot. There is also the tall gentleman with the hawk's face, and the underslung pipe, and the fore-and-aft cap. We'd know them anywhere and call them easily by name: Punch; and the Charlies, Chaplin and McCarthy; Quixote; Sir John; and Sherlock Holmes.

Now, irrelevant as this may seem, we of the Mercury Theatre are very much occupied these days with rehearsals for a revival of a fine old American farce a lot of you will remember, if only for its lovely title -- which is "Too Much Johnson." Its author was William Gillette, which reminded us, as it reminds you, of Sherlock Holmes. As everybody knows, that celebrated American inventor of underacting leant his considerable gifts as a playwright to the indestructible legend of the Conan Doyle detective and produced the play which is as much a part of the Holmes literature as any of Sir Arthur's own romances.

And, as nobody will ever forget, he gave his face to him. For William Gillette was the aquiline and actual embodiment of Holmes himself. It is too little to say that William Gillette resembled Sherlock Holmes; Sherlock Holmes looks exactly like William Gillette. Sounds like him, too, we're afraid, and hope devoutly that the Mercury Theatre and the radio will take none of the glamor from the beloved fable of Baker Street; from the pipe and the violin and the hideous purple dressing-gown; from the needle and the cigar on the window ledge, and the dry, final, famous lines -- "Elementary, my dear Watson. Elementary. The mere child's play of deduction."

MUSIC:

FOR A GRAND INTRODUCTION ... OUT WITH--

WATSON:

(NARRATES) My name is Watson. I am a doctor. It was in the year 1880 that Holmes and I were introduced by a mutual acquaintance. At the time, we were both looking for a lodging that would suit our moderate means. This we found on the second floor of a house at Two Twenty-One B, Baker Street. And it was during the years that we occupied these chambers together that Holmes established his unique international reputation as a consulting detective.

During that time, I was privileged to be his daily companion and I have done my modest share in giving to the world an account of some of his most famous cases. Most famous of these are the ones of which I have written under the names of "The Speckled Band," "Sign of Four," "Hound of the Baskervilles," and "A Study in Scarlet." They represent, however, only a minute fraction of the six hundred and forty-three cases Holmes successfully solved during the years that we shared the lodgings in Baker Street. Other cases I hope one day to give to the world include "The Tarlington Murders," "The Sudden Death of Cardinal Tosca, "The Adventure of Ricoletti of the Club Foot and His Abominable Wife," "The Case of Mrs. Farintosh, the Circus Belle," and "The Case of the Royal Family of Scandinavia." Each illustrate in their own way the remarkable genius of my friend Sherlock Holmes.

MUSIC:

SOLO VIOLIN ... CONTINUES IN BG

WATSON:

(NARRATES) Since my marriage three years ago, Holmes has continued to occupy the Baker Street lodgings by himself. And here, almost every afternoon, when my work in the office is finished, I'm in the habit of calling on him.

MUSIC:

SOLO VIOLIN GROWS LOUDER, NEARER ... CONTINUES IN BG

WATSON:

(NARRATES) The sitting room as you go in is exactly as it has been for the past thirteen years: the worn bearskin rug; the huge sofa, covered with faded chintz; the mantelpiece cluttered with miscellaneous objects, unanswered letters and piles of loose tobacco. On one side of the fireplace, in a deep armchair, his pipe curling forth slow wreaths of acrid tobacco, draped in his hideous purple dressing-gown, sits Sherlock Holmes with his violin under his chin.

MUSIC:

SOLO VIOLIN ... UP FOR A MOMENT, THEN ABRUPTLY OUT WITH--

SOUND:

KNOCK AT THE DOOR

HOLMES:

Come in.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS

HOLMES:

(GREETING) Mm, Watson, my dear fellow.

WATSON:

How are you, Holmes?

HOLMES:

I'm delighted to see you, perfectly delighted, upon my word, I am, but, er-- I'm sorry to observe that your wife has left you.

WATSON:

(LAUGHS) She has gone, on a little visit. But how did you know?

HOLMES:

How did I--? Well, I like that. How do I know anything? How do I know you've been getting yourself very wet lately; that you've an extremely careless servant girl; and that you've moved your dressing-table to the other side of the room?

WATSON:

Holmes, if you had lived a few centuries ago, they'd have burned you alive.

HOLMES:

(AMUSED) Hm! Such a conflagration would have saved me a great deal of trouble and expense.

WATSON:

Tell me now, how did you know all that?

HOLMES:

It's too simple to talk about. Scratches and clumsy cuts, my dear fellow, on the inner side of your shoe there, just where the firelight strikes it. Scratches, cuts. Somebody scraped away crusted mud -- and did it badly -- badly. Scraped the shoe along with it. There's your wet foot, my dear Watson, and your careless servant girl, all on one shoe. (RAPIDLY) Face badly shaved on the right side; always used to be on left; light must come from other side; couldn't very well move your window; must have moved your dressing-table.

WATSON:

(LAUGHS) Of course! But how the deuce did you know my wife was away?

HOLMES:

Well, where the deuce is your second waistcoat button, Watson? And what the deuce is yesterday's boutonniere doing in to-day's lapel? And why the deuce do you wear the expression of a--?

WATSON:

(LAUGHS) Marvelous!

HOLMES:

Elementary, my dear fellow, elementary. The child's play of deduction. I'm only doing it for your amusement before we pass on to more serious matters.

WATSON:

Oh, what is it now, Holmes?

HOLMES:

Watson, my dear fellow, in the enthusiasm which has prompted you to chronicle and -- if you will excuse my saying so -- somewhat to embellish my little, uh, adventures, you have occasionally seen fit to introduce a certain element of romance, which struck me as being just a trifle out of place. Something like working an elopement into the fifth proposition of Euclid. I merely refer to this in case you should see fit at some future time to chronicle the case on which I am about to embark -- the strange case of Professor Robert Moriarty.

WATSON:

Moriarty? I don't remember ever having heard of the fellow.

HOLMES:

No, Watson, you haven't. It is precisely this quality of invisibility that makes Professor Moriarty the Napoleon of crime, sitting motionless like an ugly venomous spider in the centre of his web. But that web having a thousand radiations and the spider knowing every quiver of every one of them. And within forty-eight hours, I'll have the lines drawn so tightly around him that he can't move. I'll arrest him and his entire gang.

WATSON:

Why, Holmes, this is a very dangerous thing.

HOLMES:

My dear fellow, it's perfectly delightful! My whole life is spent in a series of frantic endeavours to escape from the dreary common places of existence! For a brief period I escape! You should congratulate me! The day before yesterday, I received in this room the visit of a certain foreign nobleman who has recently inherited a very considerable title and who is about to be married. Seems that this titled gentleman was so indiscreet as to fall in love with a young English lady by the name of Faulkner -- er, socially his inferior -- and to make her a promise of marriage. Later, at his family's insistence, the thing was broken off and the young lady died shortly after of a broken heart, leaving behind a sister -- also considerable evidence in the form of letters, photographs, and jewelry with inscriptions. These the sister kept. These, together with the sister, are now being held in a house in St. John's Wood by a pair of blackmailers who go by the name of Chetwood. So far, as you see, my dear Watson, a fairly ordinary case of blackmail, hardly worth my attention. Last night, on my inspection, a certain element revealed itself which renders the case far more important than I had expected.

WATSON:

And that element was--?

HOLMES:

Professor Moriarty.

SOUND:

KNOCK AT THE DOOR

HOLMES:

Come in.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS ... BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS IN

BILLY:

Beg pardon, Mr. 'Olmes.

HOLMES:

Er, yes, Billy? What is it?

BILLY:

Gentleman to see you by the name of Forman.

HOLMES:

Show him in, Billy, show him in.

BILLY:

Yes, Mr. 'Olmes.

SOUND:

BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS MOVE OFF

BILLY:

(OFF) Come in, Mr. Forman.

HOLMES:

Good evening, Forman.

SOUND:

FORMAN'S FOOTSTEPS IN

FORMAN:

Good evening, Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

Oh, Watson, this is Inspector Forman. Since the day before yesterday, he occupies the position of butler under the name of Judson in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chetwood, the blackmailers of St. John's Wood. Well, Forman, any news?

FORMAN:

Yes, sir. This morning, a little after nine, Chetwood and his wife drove away in a four-wheeler. They returned about eleven. Bassick was with them. You know him, sir?

HOLMES:

Mm, yes. When I last had the occasion to meet Mr. Bassick, he got two years for safecracking. Go on, Forman.

FORMAN:

Well, they took this man Bassick into the library. I got a look at him from the outside. And there he was opening up the safe where they've been keeping the letters.

HOLMES:

Go on.

FORMAN:

In the end, when they got the safe open, it was empty.

HOLMES:

Hmm.

FORMAN:

The letters were gone. It seems like the Faulkner girl got them back somehow. That got them pretty excited. Bassick went out to send a telegram.

HOLMES:

Have you got a copy of it?

FORMAN:

Yes, yes. Here it is, sir. It's in code.

SOUND:

RATTLE OF TELEGRAM

HOLMES:

Hmmm. (PAUSE) Moriarty! I thought so, Watson. This case is taking a most promising turn. Forman, you'll return at once to the house in St. John's Wood. Within ten minutes, I shall be there myself. If I remember correctly, the kitchen is immediately below the drawing room. (PAUSE, TO HIMSELF) Yes. (TO FORMAN) When I knock over a chair in the drawing room, you'll overturn a lamp in the kitchen, scatter smoke balls, and give an alarm of "Fire!" All other instructions remain unchanged.

FORMAN:

Very good, sir.

HOLMES:

Hurry, Forman.

FORMAN:

Yes, Mr. Holmes.

SOUND:

FORMAN'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY ... DOOR SHUTS

HOLMES:

Well, my dear Watson, it begins to look like a most interesting evening.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... CONTINUES IN BG WHILE ALICE IS TORTURED, OUT AT [X]

LARRABEE:

Now will you give me those letters?!

ALICE:

No, I won't! I won't!

LARRABEE:

Now will ya?!

ALICE:

(IN PAIN) Oh!

LARRABEE:

Now will yaaaaa?!

ALICE:

(SCREAMS) [X]

SOUND:

KNOCK AT DOOR, DOOR OPENS, FOOTSTEPS IN, DOOR CLOSES BEHIND--

HOLMES:

Ah, good evening. My name is Sherlock Holmes.

LARRABEE:

(UNEASY BUT TRYING TO COVER IT) Whom - whom did you wish to see, Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

Oh, thank you so much, Mr. Chetwood. I had myself announced by the butler on my way up.

LARRABEE:

The butler? I didn't-- Ah, very well. Oh, here he is. Yes, Judson?

FORMAN:

(AS JUDSON THE BUTLER) Miss Faulkner begs Mr. Holmes to excuse her. She is not well enough to see anyone this evening.

HOLMES:

Will you please hand this card to Miss Faulkner and say that I have--

LARRABEE:

I beg your pardon, Mr. Holmes, but it's quite useless -- really.

HOLMES:

Oh, I'm so sorry to hear it.

LARRABEE:

Yes -- Miss Faulkner is -- I regret to say -- quite an invalid. She is unable to see anyone -- her health is so poor.

HOLMES:

Ah, has it ever occurred to you, Mr. Chetwood, that she might be confined to the house too much?

LARRABEE:

(STERN) How does that concern you?

HOLMES:

(EASILY) It doesn't. I simply made the suggestion. Might like to think it over. What's your butler's name?

FORMAN:

Judson, sir.

HOLMES:

Er, very well, Judson. Go on, take my card up.

FORMAN:

Very good, sir.

LARRABEE:

(AMUSED) Well, this is really too good. (SHARP) Why, of course he can take up your card -- or your note -- or whatever it is, if you wish it so much. I was only trying to save you the trouble.

HOLMES:

Thanks. It's hardly any trouble at all to send up a card.

LARRABEE:

Do you know, Mr. Holmes, you interest me very much?

HOLMES:

Ah, really?

LARRABEE:

Upon my word, yes! We've all heard of your wonderful methods. The astonishing manner in which you gain information from the most trifling details. Now, I dare say, in this brief moment or two, you've discovered any number of things about me.

HOLMES:

Nothing of consequence, Mr. Chetwood. I hardly more than asked myself why you were so distressed to see me at this particular moment -- and what there can possibly be about the safe in the lower part of that desk to cause you such painful anxiety.

LARRABEE:

(QUICKLY, NERVOUS) Heh! Very good! Very good indeed! If those things were only true now, I'd be wonderfully impressed. It would be absolutely remarkable--

FORMAN:

Excuse me, sir.

LARRABEE:

Ah, Judson.

FORMAN:

A message for you, Mr. Chetwood.

LARRABEE:

(TO HOLMES) You'll excuse me, I trust. (BEAT, FEIGNING ENTHUSIASM) It's from -- er -- Miss Faulkner! Well, really! She begs to be allowed to see you, Mr. Holmes. She absolutely implores it! Well, I suppose I shall have to give way. (TO FORMAN) Judson, ask Miss Faulkner to come down to the drawing-room. Say that Mr. Holmes is waiting to see her.

FORMAN:

Very good, sir.

LARRABEE:

Quite remarkable, upon my soul! May I ask, if it's not an impertinent question, what message you sent up that could so have aroused Miss Faulkner's desire to come down?

HOLMES:

Merely that if she wasn't down here in five minutes, I'd go up.

LARRABEE:

(DEFLATED) Oh. That was it.

SOUND:

MADGE'S FOOTSTEPS ON STAIRS, OFF

HOLMES:

Yes, quite so. And, unless I am greatly mistaken, I hear the young lady on the stairs. In which case, she has a minute and a half to spare.

LARRABEE:

(TO MADGE) Alice-- That is, Miss Faulkner, let me introduce Mr. Sherlock Holmes.

MADGE:

(GREETING) Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

(SKEPTICAL) Ah, Miss Faulkner.

MADGE:

I'm really most charmed to meet you -- although it does look as if you'd made me come down in spite of myself, doesn't it?

HOLMES:

I thank you very much indeed for consenting to see me, Miss Faulkner, but regret to observe that you were put to the trouble of making such a very rapid change of dress.

MADGE:

(STARTLED) Oh -- yes! I did hurry a trifle, I confess. (TO LARRABEE) Mr. Holmes is quite living up to his reputation, isn't he, Freddie?

SOUND:

KNOCK AT DOOR

MADGE:

Come in.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS

FORMAN:

Yes, ma'am?

MADGE:

What are you doing here, Judson?

FORMAN:

I beg pardon, ma'am. I was answering the bell.

LARRABEE:

What bell?

FORMAN:

The drawing-room bell, sir.

LARRABEE:

(ANNOYED) What do you mean, you blockhead? No one rang the bell.

FORMAN:

I'm quite sure it was rung, sir.

LARRABEE:

Well, I tell you it did not ring!

HOLMES:

Your butler is right, Mr. Chetwood -- the bell did ring.

LARRABEE:

How do you know?

HOLMES:

I rang it.

LARRABEE:

What do you want?

HOLMES:

I want to send my card to the real Miss Faulkner.

MADGE:

The real--?

HOLMES:

I said the real Miss Faulkner. Judson?

FORMAN:

Yes, sir?

LARRABEE:

Holmes! What right have you to ring for servants and give orders in my house?

HOLMES:

What right have you to prevent my cards from reaching their destination? And how does it happen that you and this woman are resorting to trickery and deceit to prevent me from seeing Alice Faulkner? (TO FORMAN) Through some trifling oversight, Judson, neither of the cards I handed you have been delivered. Kindly see that this error does not occur again.

FORMAN:

My orders, sir --

HOLMES:

Ah! You have orders!

FORMAN:

I can't say, sir--

HOLMES:

You were told not to deliver my card!

LARRABEE:

What business is it of yours, I'd like to know?

HOLMES:

I shall satisfy your curiosity on that point in a very short time, Mr. Chetwood.

LARRABEE:

Yes -- and you'll find out in a very short time that it isn't safe to meddle with me! It wouldn't be any trouble at all for me to throw you out into the street.

HOLMES:

Possibly not -- but trouble would swiftly follow such an experiment on your part.

LARRABEE:

It's a cursÍd lucky thing for you I'm not armed!

HOLMES:

Yes -- well, when Miss Faulkner comes down, you go and arm yourself.

LARRABEE:

Arm myself! I'll call the police! What's more, I'll do it now!

HOLMES:

Oh, no, you will not do it now. You will remain where you are until the lady I came here to see has entered this room.

LARRABEE:

What makes you so sure of that?

HOLMES:

Because you will prefer to avoid an investigation of your suspicious conduct, Mr. James Larrabee.

LARRABEE:

"Larrabee"?!

HOLMES:

That is the name under which you are known to Scotland Yard, I believe, Mr. "Chetwood." This lady here is your wife. (TO FORMAN) As to you, Judson, you will either deliver that card to Miss Faulkner at once -- or sleep in the police station tonight. It's a matter of small consequence to me which you do.

FORMAN:

(TO LARRABEE) Shall I - shall I go, sir?

LARRABEE:

(FRUSTRATED) Go on. Take up the card -- it makes no difference to me.

HOLMES:

A short time since, Larrabee, you displayed an acute anxiety to leave the room. Pray do not let me detain you -- or your wife -- any longer. (NO ANSWER) I take it you prefer to remain while I talk to Miss Faulkner?

LARRABEE:

We do, Mr. Holmes.

SOUND:

ALICE'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

HOLMES:

Ah, at last. Miss Faulkner.

ALICE:

This is Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

Yes.

ALICE:

You wished to see me?

HOLMES:

Very much indeed, Miss Faulkner, but I am sorry to see that you are far from well.

ALICE:

Oh, no, I--

HOLMES:

No? I beg your pardon. What does this mark mean?

ALICE:

Oh -- nothing.

HOLMES:

Nothing?

ALICE:

No.

HOLMES:

And the mark here on your neck, plainly showing the clutch of a man's fingers? Does that mean nothing also? (NO ANSWER) It occurs to me that I should like to have an explanation of this. Possibly you can furnish one, Mr. Larrabee?

LARRABEE:

How should I know?

HOLMES:

It seems to have occurred in your own house.

LARRABEE:

What if it did? You'd better understand that it isn't healthy for you or anyone else to interfere with my business!

HOLMES:

Ah! Then it is your business. We have that much at least. (TO ALICE) Pray be seated, Miss Faulkner.

ALICE:

I don't know who you are, Mr. Holmes, or why you are here.

HOLMES:

I shall be very glad indeed to explain. My business is this. I've been consulted as to the possibility of obtaining from you certain letters addressed to your sister which are supposed to be in your possession.

ALICE:

I cannot give up my sister's letters, Mr. Holmes. There are other things beside revenge -- there is punishment.

HOLMES:

Believe me, Miss Faulkner--

ALICE:

There is nothing more to say. Good night, Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

But my dear Miss Faulkner --

SOUND:

WOODEN CHAIR CLATTERS LOUDLY TO THE FLOOR

HOLMES:

Oh, I'm so sorry. How clumsy of me to turn over this chair.

SOUND:

FORMAN'S FOOTSTEPS RUNNING UP STAIRS ... CONTINUES IN BG

FORMAN:

(OFF) Fire! Fire! Help! Help!

HOLMES:

What's that? What's that? What's going on in your house here?

LARRABEE:

What is it? What's going on?!

FORMAN:

Fire, Mr. Chetwood! Fire!

LARRABEE:

Fire? Where?

FORMAN: The lamp, sir!

LARRABEE:

Lamp?

FORMAN:

The lamp in the kitchen, sir! It fell off the table an' everything down there is blazin', sir!

LARRABEE:

Blazing?

FORMAN:

Quick, sir! Come down!

LARRABEE:

We're coming!

MADGE:

(SCREAMS)

SOUND:

MADGE, LARRABEE AND JUDSON'S FOOTSTEPS RUSH OUT ... DOOR SLAMS ... BRIEF PAUSE

HOLMES:

(CALM) Don't alarm yourself, Miss Faulkner. There is no fire.

ALICE:

(STUNNED) No fire?

HOLMES:

The smoke was all - arranged for.

ALICE:

Arranged for? What does it mean, Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

It means this, Miss Faulkner. It means that I wanted a package of letters, Miss Faulkner, and that by following your eyes just now when you thought there was a fire, I discovered that you'd hidden them in the upholstery of this chair.

SOUND:

HOLMES FOOTSTEPS TO CHAIR ... HE RIPS OPEN THE UPHOLSTERY ... RATTLE OF PAPERS

HOLMES:

Quite elementary, as you see. And now that they are in my possession, there seems to be no reason for me to remain any longer in this house. Good night, Miss Faulkner.

SOUND:

HOLMES' FOOTSTEPS START OFF BUT THEN STOP

HOLMES:

(OFF) Miss Faulkner?

ALICE:

Yes?

SOUND:

HOLMES' FOOTSTEPS RETURN

HOLMES:

I - I can't take them, Miss Faulkner. These letters belong to you. I find that I cannot keep them -- unless you can possibly change your mind and let me have them of your own free will. (NO ANSWER, HE CHUCKLES) I hardly supposed you could. I will therefore return them to you and, er-- Oh, here's our friend, Mr. Larrabee, returning from the fire.

SOUND:

LARRABEE'S AND MADGE'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH ... DOOR OPENS, CLOSES

LARRABEE:

So! You've got the letters, have you? Now, I suppose we're going to see you walk out of the house with them!

HOLMES:

On the contrary, you're going to see me return them to their rightful owner. (TO ALICE) Miss Faulkner, here are your letters. Should you ever change your mind and be so generous, so forgiving, as to wish to return these letters to the one who wrote them, you have my address. In any event, rest assured there will be no more cruelty, no more persecution, in this house.

ALICE:

Thank you, Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

You are perfectly safe with your property, Miss Faulkner -- for I shall so arrange it that your faintest cry of distress will be heard! And if that cry is heard, it will be very unfortunate for those who are responsible. As for you, Mr. Larrabee, and you, madam, I beg you to understand that you continue your persecution of that young lady at your peril. Hm. Good night.

SOUND:

HOLMES' FOOTSTEPS AWAY ... DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS OFF

LARRABEE:

(MENACING) Miss Faulkner? Come here, Miss Faulkner. Now! Are you going to give me those letters?

ALICE:

No! Never.

LARRABEE:

(SAVAGE) Are you going to give me those letters?!

ALICE:

(CRIES OUT IN PAIN)

LARRABEE:

Now, then--!

MADGE:

Be careful, Jim.

LARRABEE:

(TO MADGE) You shut up. (TO ALICE) Now, then, Miss Faulkner -- do you give me those letters or do I break your arm?!

ALICE:

(SCREAMS)

SOUND:

THREE LOUD THUMPS

LARRABEE:

What's that?

MADGE:

Someone knocked on the door.

LARRABEE:

No. It was on that side.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS ... FORMAN'S FOOTSTEPS IN

FORMAN:

Did you call, madam?

MADGE:

I think someone knocked, Judson.

FORMAN:

I'll see, madam.

SOUND:

FORMAN'S FOOTSTEPS MOVE OFF, THEN RETURN

FORMAN:

I beg pardon, madam, but there's no one at the door.

MADGE:

Very well. You may go.

SOUND:

FORMAN'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY ... DOOR CLOSES

MADGE:

(LOW) He's got us watched!

LARRABEE:

(LOW) What we want to do is to leave it alone. Let the "Emperor" have it!

MADGE:

Do you mean -- Professor Moriarty?

LARRABEE:

That's who I mean. Once let him get at it, he'll settle it with Holmes pretty quick. Don't you worry a minute. I tell you, Professor Moriarty'll get at him before noon tomorrow night! He won't wait long either! And when he strikes -- it means death.

MUSIC:

SAVAGE MENACING BRIDGE

SOUND:

THREE LONG BUZZES

MORIARTY:

Number?

BASSICK:

(FILTER) Eighty-two. Vee. Seventy-one.

MORIARTY:

Correct. Moriarty speaking. Come in, Bassick.

SOUND:

LEVER PULLED ... DOOR SLIDES OPEN ... THEN ROLLS SHUT BEHIND--

MORIARTY:

Your report, coming from Manning?

BASSICK:

(BITTER) The whole thing was a trap. Set and baited by an expert.

MORIARTY:

And Manning?

BASSICK:

Manning has disappeared.

MORIARTY:

Disappeared? Sherlock Holmes again. And now this Larrabee job. He's in on that, too. And that's where he's made his mistake. Mr. Holmes is playing rather a dangerous game, Bassick! Inspector Wilson tried it seven years ago. Wilson is dead. Two years later, Henderson took it up. We haven't heard anything of Henderson lately, eh?

BASSICK:

(PROUD) Not a thing, sir.

MORIARTY:

(CHUCKLES) You've seen about that. This Holmes is rather a talented man. He doesn't realize there isn't a street in London that'll be safe for him if I whisper his name to Craigin. I might even make him a little call myself -- just for the satisfaction of it -- (SAVORS THE IDEA) -- just for the satisfaction of it. Baker Street, isn't it, his place? Baker Street, eh?

BASSICK:

Baker Street, sir.

MORIARTY:

We could make it safe. We could make it absolutely safe for three streets in every direction.

BASSICK:

Yes, sir, but--

MORIARTY:

We could. We've done it over and over again elsewhere -- police decoyed; men in every doorway. Do this tonight -- in Baker Street! At nine o'clock, call his attendants out on one pretext or another, and keep them out -- you understand? I'll see this Sherlock Holmes myself. I'll give him a chance for his life but-- Bassick?

BASSICK:

Yes, sir?

MORIARTY:

Notify the Lascar that I may require the gas chamber at Stepney tomorrow night. And have Craigin there at a quarter before ten with his crew.

BASSICK:

Mm.

MORIARTY:

Tell Larrabee I shall want him to write a letter to Mr. Sherlock Holmes which I shall dictate. Meet me here at seven. And, Bassick, place your men at nine tonight for Sherlock Holmes's house in Baker Street.

BASSICK:

You'll still go there yourself, sir?

MORIARTY:

I will still go there myself.

BASSICK:

But this meeting to-night, sir, to get him in the Gas Chamber--?

MORIARTY:

If I fail to kill him in Baker Street, we'll have him in Swandam Lane. Either way I have him, Bassick. Two strings to our bow. Two strings, eh, Bassick? (EVIL LAUGHTER)

BASSICK:

(JOINS HIM IN EVIL LAUGHTER)

MUSIC:

OMINOUS BRIDGE

WATSON:

(NARRATES) That evening, Holmes and I dined together at Scott's in Piccadilly Circus. After dinner, we went to a concert at Queen's Hall. I can still see him on this particular night of the Moriarty case, well-knowing that his life was in peril, sitting beside me in the stalls, wrapped in the most perfect happiness, listening to Sarasate play the violin, gently waving his long thin fingers in time to the music.

MUSIC:

VIOLIN, WITH ORCHESTRA ACCOMPANIMENT ... CLIMAX OF UPTEMPO CONCERT PIECE ... THEN OUT

SOUND:

CROWD CHEERS AND APPLAUDS ... MURMURING CROWD CONTINUES IN BG

WATSON:

(NARRATES) When it was over, he rose, put on his long coat, and started with long steps in the direction of the street.

HOLMES:

Come, my dear Watson, let's go home to Baker Street. I have an idea that very soon we shall be receiving a most interesting visit.

MUSIC:

CYMBAL CRASH ... MOODY BRIDGE

WATSON:

(NARRATES) In front of Queen's Hall, we hailed a hansom and, as we came down Baker Street, we could see that the light was burning on the second floor of Two Twenty-One B. We went up the dark, narrow stairs.

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS UP STAIRS ... DOOR UNLOCKS, OPENS, CLOSES

BILLY:

Mr. 'Olmes?

WATSON:

(NARRATES) The boy, Billy, was waiting for us.

BILLY:

Mr. 'Olmes?

HOLMES:

Yes? What is it?

BILLY:

Mrs. 'Udson's compliments, sir, an' she wants to know if she can see you?

HOLMES:

Well, where is Mrs. Hudson?

BILLY:

Downstairs in the kitchen, sir.

HOLMES:

(IN A WHIMSICAL MOOD) My compliments, and I don't think she can -- from where she is.

BILLY:

She'll be very sorry, sir.

HOLMES:

Our regret will be mutual.

BILLY:

It was most terrible important, sir, seein' as she wants to know what you'll have for your breakfast in the mornin'.

HOLMES:

Er, the same.

BILLY:

Same as when, sir?

HOLMES:

This morning.

BILLY:

But you didn't 'ave nothing, sir -- you wasn't 'ere.

HOLMES:

I won't be here tomorrow.

BILLY:

Yes, sir. Was that all, sir?

HOLMES:

Quite so.

BILLY:

Yes, sir. Thank you, sir. Oh, Mr. 'Olmes, 'ere's a letter for you, sir, on the table. Delivered ten minutes ago.

HOLMES:

Mm, read it, Watson, there's a good fellow, while I put on my dressing-gown.

WATSON:

Yes. (READS) "Dear Sir--"

HOLMES:

(STILL WHIMSICAL) Who thus addresses me?

WATSON:

Why, er -- James Larrabee.

HOLMES:

And what has James to say this evening?

WATSON:

(READS) "Dear Sir--"

HOLMES:

I hope he won't say that again.

WATSON:

(CHUCKLES, READS) "I have the honour to inform you that Miss Faulkner has changed her mind regarding the letters, et cetera, which you wish to obtain, and has decided to dispose of them for a monetary consideration."

HOLMES:

Mm.

WATSON:

(READS) "If you wish to negotiate, will you be at nine o'clock at the Guards' Monument at the foot of Waterloo Place. You will see a four-wheeler with wooden shutters to the windows. If you have the cab followed, or try any other underhand trick, you won't get what you want. Let me know your decision. Yours truly, James Larrabee."

HOLMES:

Hm! Mine truly. Well, later, perhaps.

WATSON:

What does the fellow mean?

HOLMES:

The fellow means to sell me a base imitation, for a large sum of money, of certain letters that he does not possess. I shall probably buy them from him. Now, see if I have the points. To-night, eleven o'clock -- Guards' Monument -- cab with wooden shutters. No one to come with me. No one to follow -- or I don't get what I want.

WATSON:

Quite right.

HOLMES:

Ah!

WATSON:

But this cab with the wooden shutters--?

HOLMES: Oh, merely a little device to keep me from seeing where they're taking me.

SOUND:

HOLMES RINGS HANDBELL

HOLMES:

(CALLS) Billy!

BILLY:

Yes, sir?

SOUND:

BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS IN

HOLMES:

Er, give this to the man that--

BILLY:

It was a woman, sir.

HOLMES:

Oh? Young or old?

BILLY:

Looked quite young, sir.

HOLMES:

In a hansom?

BILLY:

Four-wheeler, sir.

HOLMES:

Seen the driver before?

BILLY:

Yes, sir -- but I can't think where.

HOLMES:

Hand this to the lady, apologize for the delay, and look at the driver again.

BILLY:

Yes, sir!

SOUND:

BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS RUN OFF

WATSON:

But, my dear Holmes -- you didn't say you would go?

HOLMES:

But I certainly did.

WATSON:

But this fellow means mischief.

HOLMES:

This fellow means the same.

SOUND:

BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS RUN IN

BILLY:

(APPROACHES, BREATHLESS) I beg pardon, sir! A message come over from the chemist's on the corner to say a man 'as been 'it by a bus. Looks like 'is leg's broke. An' would Dr. Watson kindly step over and 'elp till the ambulance comes?

WATSON:

Oh, yes -- certainly -- I'll go at once. I'll be back in a minute, Holmes.

SOUND:

WATSON'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY

HOLMES:

Er, Billy?

BILLY:

Yes, sir?

HOLMES:

Who brought that message?

BILLY:

Boy from the chemist's, sir.

HOLMES:

Yes, of course, but which boy?

BILLY:

Must-a-bin a new one, sir -- I ain't seen 'im before.

HOLMES:

(URGENT, RAPID) Billy! Get downstairs quickly! Look after the doctor. If the boy's gone and there's a man with him, it means mischief. Let me know. Don't stop to come up, ring the door bell. I'll hear it. Ring it loud.

BILLY:

Yes, sir!

SOUND:

BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS RUN OFF, THEN DOWN STAIRS ... PAUSE ... DOOR BELL RINGS

BILLY:

(OFF, SHOUTS TO HOLMES) Look out, sir! Look out! Look out--! (ABRUPTLY MUFFLED)

SOUND:

LOUD THUMP OF FRONT DOOR, FROM OFF ... BEAT ... MORIARTY'S FOOTSTEPS SLOWLY UP STAIRS ... GROWING CLOSER ... DOOR OPENS ... MORIARTY'S FOOTSTEPS IN ... DOOR SHUTS

MORIARTY:

It's a dangerous habit, Mr. Holmes, to finger loaded firearms in the pocket of one's dressing-gown.

HOLMES:

I give you my word, Professor Moriarty, you'll be taken from here to the hospital if you keep your hand behind you like that. (PAUSE) Ah, that's better. Hm. In that case, please put your revolver on the table.

SOUND:

REVOLVER ON WOODEN TABLE

MORIARTY:

You evidently don't know me.

HOLMES:

I think it's quite evident that I do. Pray have a chair, Professor. I can spare you five minutes -- that is, if you have anything to say. Careful! What were you about to do, Professor Moriarty?

MORIARTY:

Look at my watch.

HOLMES:

I'll tell you when your five minutes is up.

MORIARTY:

It is your intention to pursue this case against me?

HOLMES:

That is my intention -- to the very end.

MORIARTY:

I regret this -- not so much on my own account -- but on yours.

HOLMES:

I share your regret, Professor, but solely because of the rather uncomfortable position it will cause you to occupy.

MORIARTY:

May I inquire as to what position you are pleased to allude, Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

I refer to the position you will occupy at the end of a rope, Professor Moriarty.

MORIARTY:

And have you the faintest idea that you'd be permitted to live to see that day?

HOLMES:

As to that, I do not particularly care, so that I bring you to see it.

MORIARTY:

You'll never bring me to see it. Do you think that I would be here if I hadn't made the streets quite safe in every respect?

HOLMES:

I could never so grossly overestimate your courage as that, Professor Moriarty.

MORIARTY: Do you imagine that your friend the doctor, and your boy Billy, will soon return?

HOLMES:

What?!

MORIARTY:

So -- it leaves us quite alone, doesn't it, sir? Heh. Quite alone -- so that we can talk the matter over quietly, Mr. Holmes, and not be disturbed. In the first place, I wish to call your attention to a few memoranda which I've jotted down and which you will find-- Ah, here they are.

HOLMES:

Look out! Don't do that! Get your hands down quickly! A little farther away from that memorandum book you're talking about.

MORIARTY:

I was merely about to take out a small notebook.

HOLMES:

Well, merely don't do it. I don't want it. Got one of my own. If you want it, we'll have someone get it for you.

SOUND:

HOLMES RINGS HANDBELL

HOLMES:

I always like to save my guests unnecessary trouble.

MORIARTY:

(PAUSE) I observe that your boy doesn't answer the bell.

HOLMES:

No. But I have an idea that he will before long.

MORIARTY:

It may possibly be longer than you think, Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

What? That boy?

MORIARTY:

Yes. That boy.

HOLMES:

At least we'll try the bell once more, Professor.

SOUND:

HOLMES RINGS HANDBELL

MORIARTY:

Doesn't it occur to you that he may possibly have been detained, Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

It does, Professor. But it also occurs to me that you're in very much the same predicament, Professor Moriarty.

SOUND:

HOLMES RINGS HANDBELL ... BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS RUN UP STAIRS ... DOOR OPENS ... BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS IN

BILLY:

(BREATHLESS) I beg pardon, sir -- someone tried to 'old me, sir!

HOLMES:

It's quite evident, however, that he failed to do so.

BILLY:

Yes, sir -- 'e's got my coat, sir, but 'e ain't got me!

HOLMES:

Billy?

BILLY:

Yes, sir?

HOLMES:

Billy, the gentleman I am carefully pointing out to you with this forty-five desires to have us get something out of his left hand inside coat pocket. As he's not feeling quite himself to-day, and the consequence of his trying to do it himself might prove fatal, I suggest you attend to it for him.

BILLY:

Yes, sir. Is this it, sir? This gun?

HOLMES:

Quite so. Quite so. Put it on the table. Ah, not there, Billy. On this table, where I can reach it.

SOUND:

GUN PLACED ON TABLE

HOLMES:

That's more like it. That's all, Billy.

BILLY:

Shall I see if he's got another, sir?

HOLMES:

Why, Billy, you surprise me. After the gentleman has taken the trouble to inform us that he hasn't?

BILLY:

When, sir?

HOLMES:

When he made a snatch for this one. And now, Professor-- Now that we have your little "memorandum book," do you think of anything else you'd like before Billy goes? Any little thing you've got that you don't want? (NO ANSWER) So sorry, that's all, Billy.

BILLY:

Thank you, sir.

SOUND:

BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY ... DOOR CLOSES, BEHIND--

MORIARTY:

Listen, Holmes, to me. On the fourth of January you crossed my path -- on the twenty-third you incommoded me. And now, at the close of April, I find myself placed in such a position through your continual interference that I am in positive danger of losing my liberty.

HOLMES:

Mm. Have you any suggestions to make?

MORIARTY:

No, I have no suggestions to make. I have a fact to state. If you don't drop it at once, your life's not worth that. (SNAPS FINGERS)

HOLMES:

I am afraid, Professor, that in the pleasure of this conversation I am neglecting more important business. (MOVING OFF) If you will excuse me a moment while I get my pipe off the mantelpiece here.

MORIARTY:

I came here this evening, Mr. Holmes, to see if peace could not be arranged between us.

HOLMES:

(OFF, ABSENTLY) Mm, quite so, quite so.

MORIARTY:

You've seen fit not only to reject my proposals, but to make insulting references coupled with threats of arrest. You've been warned of your danger -- you don't heed that warning -- perhaps you will heed this!

SOUND:

MORIARTY SCRAMBLES FOR GUN, PICKS IT UP

MORIARTY:

Up with your hands, Mr. Holmes! Up with them or I--!

SOUND:

EMPTY REVOLVER CLICKS REPEATEDLY

MORIARTY:

(SPUTTERS IN SURPRISE)

HOLMES:

(PAUSE, CASUALLY) Hm. Didn't imagine I'd leave that gun loaded, did you, Professor Moriarty? Hm. Here are your cartridges.

SOUND:

CARTRIDGES PLACED ON TABLE

HOLMES:

I didn't suppose you'd want to use that gun again, so I took them out while you were talking, put them in my pocket. You'll find them all there, Professor.

SOUND:

HOLMES RINGS HANDBELL ... DOOR OPENS ... BILLY'S FOOTSTEPS IN

HOLMES:

Billy?

BILLY:

Yes, sir?

HOLMES:

Will you please show Professor Moriarty the door?

BILLY:

Yes, sir! This way, sir!

MORIARTY:

(MOVING OFF, MUTTERING) Don't ever say I didn't warn you, Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

Er, no, no, Professor Moriarty. No. I never will.

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS

HOLMES:

Billy, come here.

BILLY:

Yes, sir?

HOLMES:

Billy-- (PAUSE, SIMPLY) Billy, you're a good boy.

BILLY:

(PLEASED) Yes, sir! Thank you, sir!

MUSIC:

UPBEAT BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

You are listening to the Columbia Broadcasting System's presentation of Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air in "Sherlock Holmes" with Orson Welles in the title role and Ray Collins as Dr. Watson. We pause a moment for station identification. This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE, THEN FADES OUT

SOUND:

LONG PAUSE FOR STATION IDENTIFICATION

ANNOUNCER:

We continue now with this CBS presentation of "Sherlock Holmes" played by Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air.

SOUND:

OMINOUS BELL TOLLING NINE O'CLOCK ... CONTINUES IN BG

WATSON:

(NARRATES) It was exactly nine o'clock when Sherlock Holmes left the house in Baker Street. He had given the strictest instructions that no one was to follow him. If there had been no word from him by noon of the following day, we must notify Scotland Yard. I went to the window and looked after him as he went down Baker Street -- a tall, thin figure in a grey ulster, walking with long, smooth steps in the direction of Langham Place. There, he entered a cab.

MUSIC:

JOINS THE BELLS FOR AN OMINOUS BRIDGE ... THEN OUT

SOUND:

HEAVY METAL DOOR UNBOLTED, CREAKS OPENS ... FOOTSTEPS IN

LEARY:

'Ere, what are ya doin', lightin' matches here?

CRAIGIN:

That's what I'm doin'.

LEARY:

Chuck it.

CRAIGIN:

Why should I chuck it?

LEARY:

There might be gas, you fool.

CRAIGIN:

There ain't no gas! It's been four days since we 'ad gas in the room.

LEARY:

Yeah, I still say there might be gas.

CRAIGIN:

Did you check it?

LEARY:

I will. Here goes. Ready?

CRAIGIN:

Give 'er a turn.

SOUND:

NASTY HISS OF GAS

CRAIGIN:

That'll do. Turn 'er off.

SOUND:

GAS TURNED OFF

LEARY:

Five minutes of that, all your troubles are ended.

SOUND:

METAL DOOR OPENS OFF

LEARY:

Here! What's that?

CRAIGIN:

(CALLS, LOW) Bassick?

BASSICK:

(APPROACHES) That's right, Craigin. That you, Leary?

LEARY:

Yes, sir.

BASSICK:

McTague?

McTAGUE:

Here, sir.

BASSICK:

Be careful now, ye boys -- we've got a tough one to-night.

CRAIGIN:

You ain't said who, as I've 'eard.

BASSICK:

Sherlock Holmes.

CRAIGIN:

(UNHAPPY) Oh. You mean that, sir?

BASSICK:

God's truth!

CRAIGIN:

We're goin' to count 'im out?

BASSICK:

Well, if you don't and he gets away -- I'm sorry for you, that's all.

SOUND:

METAL DOOR OPENS OFF

BASSICK:

The guv'nor's here.

CRAIGIN:

Not the guv'nor himself? Professor Moriarty?

BASSICK:

Shut up.

SOUND:

MORIARTY'S AND LARRABEE'S FOOTSTEPS SLOWLY APPROACH

MORIARTY:

Where's Craigin?

CRAIGIN:

'Ere, sir.

MORIARTY:

Got your full crew?

CRAIGIN:

All 'ere, sir.

MORIARTY:

No mistakes to-night, Craigin.

CRAIGIN:

I'll be careful o' that, sir.

MORIARTY:

This is Larrabee.

LARRABEE:

Hello.

MORIARTY:

He's in on this job

CRAIGIN:

Hello, Larrabee.

MORIARTY:

What's that door, Bassick?

BASSICK:

A small cupboard, sir.

MORIARTY:

No outlet?

BASSICK:

None whatever, sir.

MORIARTY:

That window?

BASSICK:

Nailed down, sir!

MORIARTY:

A man might break the glass.

BASSICK:

If he did, he'd come up against heavy iron bars outside.

CRAIGIN:

Huh! We'll 'ave 'im tied down afore 'e can break any glass, sir.

MORIARTY:

Oh, you've used it before, eh? Of course you know it's airtight?

BASSICK:

Every crevice is sealed, sir.

MORIARTY:

When the men have turned the gas on him, they leave by this door?

BASSICK:

Yes, sir.

MORIARTY:

It can be made quite secure?

BASSICK:

Heavy bolts on the outside, sir; solid oak bars over all.

MORIARTY:

Let me see how quick you can operate them.

BASSICK:

They tie a man down, sir -- there's no need to hurry.

MORIARTY:

Let me see how quick you can operate them!

BASSICK:

Leary?

LEARY: Yes, sir.

SOUND:

LEARY'S FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR ... CREAKING DOOR SLAMS SHUT, BOLTS SLIDE SHUT, BARS DROP

MORIARTY:

That's - that's good. Open it up.

SOUND:

BARS UP, BOLTS SLIDE BACK, DOOR OPENS

MORIARTY:

Now, Craigin -- and the rest of you. One thing remember. Whatever happens, no shooting to-night! Not a single shot. It can be heard in the alley below. The first thing is to get his revolver away before he has a chance to use it. Two of you attract his attention in front -- the other come up on him from behind and snatch it out of his pocket. Then you have him. Arrange that, Craigin.

CRAIGIN:

I'll attend to it, sir.

MORIARTY:

Mr. Larrabee, you understand? They wait for you.

LARRABEE:

I understand, sir.

MORIARTY:

I give you this opportunity to sell him the packet of letters you forged and get what you can for your trouble. A few hundred pounds doesn't interest me, Mr. Larrabee. (INTENSE) What I am after is Holmes.

LARRABEE:

I understand, sir.

MORIARTY:

When you've finished and got your money, you whistle -- and these gentlemen come in. Let's hear it.

LARRABEE:

(SHARP LOUD WHISTLE)

MORIARTY:

You hear that, Craigin? That's right. And, Craigin. At the proper moment, present my compliments to Mr. Sherlock Holmes, and say that I wished him a pleasant journey to the other side. (EVIL CHUCKLE) Come on, Bassick. (MOVING OFF) Good night, gentlemen.

SOUND:

CREW MURMURS "GOOD NIGHT" AS MORIARTY'S AND BASSICK'S FOOTSTEPS DEPART

MORIARTY:

(OFF) Good night, Larrabee.

LARRABEE:

Good night, sir.

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS FADE OUT

LARRABEE:

All right, boys. Clear? When you 'ear the whistle, in you come.

CRAIGIN:

Right you are, sir.

SOUND:

CRAIGIN AND McTAGUE FILE OUT OF THE ROOM BEHIND--

LARRABEE:

Leary?

LEARY:

Yes, sir?

LARRABEE:

You get down on the corner below and let me know when he comes.

LEARY:

'Ow will I let you know?

LARRABEE:

Well, when you see him driving up, come down the alley and whistle three times.

LEARY:

Very good, sir.

SOUND:

LEARY'S FOOTSTEPS MOVE OFF

LEARY:

(OFF) Here, what's this?

ALICE:

(SCREAMS)

LEARY:

(OFF) How did you get in? What are you doing there in the back, hey?

SOUND:

LEARY AND ALICE STRUGGLE ... CONTINUES IN BG

LARRABEE:

What is it, Leary?

LEARY:

A woman, here in the back!

LARRABEE:

Bring her in!

LEARY:

Come on, you. Come on.

SOUND:

STRUGGLE ENDS AS ALICE IS DRAGGED TO LARRABEE ... THEN LEARY PRESUMABLY DEPARTS

LARRABEE:

Ohhh! So it's you, Miss Faulkner.

ALICE:

It's true, then?

LARRABEE:

How did you get to this place?

ALICE:

I followed you in a cab.

LARRABEE:

What have you been doing since I came up here? Informing the police, perhaps?

ALICE:

No -- I was afraid he'd come, so I waited.

LARRABEE:

To warn him, I suppose?

ALICE:

Yes. To warn him, yes. You're going to swindle and deceive him -- sell him a packet of false letters, I know that. What else are you going to do to him?

LARRABEE:

(AMUSED) Hm! Wouldn't you like to know?

ALICE:

Where are those men who came up here?

LARRABEE:

What men?

ALICE:

Three terrible-looking men -- I saw them go in at the street door.

LARRABEE:

You don't mean -- these men, do you, Miss Faulkner? (SHARP LOUD WHISTLE)

SOUND:

CRAIGIN AND McTAGUE RUSH IN, GRAB ALICE

ALICE:

(STARTLED SCREAM)

SOUND:

ALICE AND CREW STRUGGLE

LARRABEE:

Tie her up, boys, so she can't make a noise! Tie her up!

SOUND:

STRUGGLE ENDS ... A LONG TWO-NOTE WHISTLE, FROM OFF

LARRABEE:

Listen!

SOUND:

SECOND LONG WHISTLE

LARRABEE:

That's him. There he is now.

SOUND:

THIRD LONG WHISTLE

CRAIGIN:

What? 'Olmes?

LARRABEE:

That's him. That's the signal.

CRAIGIN:

We won't have time to get her out.

LARRABEE:

Shut her in there -- in the cupboard.

McTAGUE:

Yeah -- that'll do.

SOUND:

CREW DRAGS ALICE TO CUPBOARD, OPENS CUPBOARD DOOR

LARRABEE:

In with her. Into the cupboard.

SOUND:

CREW FORCES ALICE INTO CUPBOARD

CRAIGIN:

Hey! There ain't no lock to this 'ere cupboard door.

LARRABEE:

Well, drive something in, then.

CRAIGIN:

Here, this knife. This'll do it.

McTAGUE:

Yeah.

SOUND:

CUPBOARD DOOR SLAMS SHUT

LARRABEE:

That'll hold her. Now, get out! Quick! Quick!

SOUND:

CREW HURRIES OUT ... PAUSE ... METAL DOOR CREAKS OPEN ... HOLMES' FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

LARRABEE:

Good evening, Mr. Holmes.

HOLMES:

Ah, Mr. Larrabee. Heh! Now, really. I certainly thought, after all this driving about in a closed cab, you'd show me something new.

LARRABEE:

Seen it before, have you, Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

Well, a time or two. Now that I come to think of it, I nabbed a friend of yours in this place while he was trying to drop himself out of the window. Ned Colvin, the cracksman.

LARRABEE:

Colvin, Colvin? Never heard of him before.

HOLMES:

Well, you certainly never heard of him after, I'm sure of that. A brace of counterfeiters used these luxurious chambers in the spring of '89. One of them hid in that cupboard. We pulled him out by the heels.

LARRABEE:

Quite interesting. But times have changed since then.

HOLMES:

Ah, so they have, Mr. Larrabee, so they have. Then it was only cracksmen, counterfeiters, pickpockets and petty swindlers of various kinds, but now --

LARRABEE:

Well? What now?

HOLMES:

Well, between you and me, Mr. Larrabee -- we've heard some not altogether agreeable rumours. Rumours of some pretty shady work not far from here -- a murder or two of a very peculiar kind. I've always had a suspicion-- (PAUSE) That's it! My surmise was correct -- it is.

LARRABEE:

It is what?

HOLMES:

This room is caulked. Sealed.

LARRABEE:

What does that signify to us?

HOLMES:

Nothing to us, Mr. Larrabee, nothing to us, but it might signify a good deal to some poor devil who's been caught and gassed in this trap.

LARRABEE:

Well, if it's nothing to us, suppose we leave it alone and get to business. My time is limited.

HOLMES:

Of course. I should have realized that these reflections could not possibly appeal to you.

LARRABEE:

Smoke? (BEAT) Have a cigar, Mr. Holmes?

HOLMES:

Ah, thanks. A good cigar this, Mr. Larrabee.

SOUND:

STRIKES A MATCH

HOLMES:

(PUFFS ON CIGAR) A genuine Havana.

LARRABEE:

Glad you like it. Now, here is the little packet of letters which is the object of this meeting. I haven't opened it yet, but Miss Faulkner tells me everything is there.

HOLMES:

Suppose, Mr. Larrabee, that as Miss Faulkner knows nothing about this affair, we omit her name from the discussion.

LARRABEE:

What do you mean? Who told you she doesn't know?

HOLMES:

You did. Every look, tone, gesture -- everything you've said and done since I've been in this room has informed me that Miss Faulkner has never consented to this transaction. It is a little speculation of your own.

LARRABEE:

Oh? I suppose you think you can read me like a book!

HOLMES:

Oh, no, no -- like a primer.

LARRABEE:

Well, let it pass. How much'll you give?

HOLMES:

A thousand pounds.

LARRABEE:

I couldn't take it.

HOLMES:

What do you ask?

LARRABEE:

Five thousand.

HOLMES:

I couldn't give it.

LARRABEE:

Why, I've been offered four thousand for this little packet!

HOLMES:

Why didn't you take it?

LARRABEE:

Because I intended to get more.

HOLMES:

Oh, that's too bad.

LARRABEE:

They offered four thousand. They'll give five.

HOLMES:

They won't give anything.

LARRABEE:

Why not?

HOLMES:

They've turned the case over to me.

LARRABEE:

Oh. Will you give three thousand?

HOLMES:

Mr. Larrabee, strange as it may appear, my time is limited as well as yours. I have brought with me the sum of one thousand pounds, which is all that I wish to pay. If it's your desire to sell at this figure, kindly appraise me of the fact at once. If not, permit me to wish you a very good evening. (NO ANSWER) Well?

LARRABEE:

You can have it. It's too small a matter to haggle over. Give me the money.

HOLMES:

Ah, certainly.

SOUND:

SHUFFLE OF PAPER MONEY

LARRABEE:

Oh -- I thought you said you'd only brought just a thousand.

HOLMES:

I did. This is it.

LARRABEE:

You brought a trifle more, I see.

HOLMES:

Ah, quite so. I didn't say I hadn't brought any more.

LARRABEE:

(SNEERS) Oh, you can do your little tricks when it comes to it, can't you?

HOLMES:

It depends on who I'm dealing with.

LARRABEE:

Here, you give me that money. Come on, quick! Hand it over!

SOUND:

BRIEF STRUGGLE

LARRABEE:

(SCREAMS IN PAIN)

HOLMES:

Now -- I've got you where I want you, James Larrabee. You've been so cunning and so cautious and so wise, we couldn't find a thing to hold you for -- but this little slip will get you in for robbery.

LARRABEE:

Oh, you'll have me in, will you? What are your views about being able to get away from here yourself?

HOLMES:

I do not anticipate any particular difficulty.

LARRABEE:

(SCOFFS) Ah, robbery, eh? Why, even if you got away from here, you haven't got a witness. You haven't got a witness to your name!

HOLMES:

I'm not so sure of that, Mr. Larrabee. Not so sure of that. Do you usually fasten this cupboard door with a knife?!

SOUND:

HOLMES' HURRIED FOOTSTEPS TO CUPBOARD

LARRABEE:

Come away from that door!

SOUND:

CUPBOARD DOOR OPENS ... KNIFE RATTLES TO FLOOR

HOLMES:

Miss Faulkner!

ALICE:

(MOANS)

SOUND:

ALICE FALLS OUT OF CUPBOARD

HOLMES:

(FURIOUS, TO LARRABEE) Stand back. You contemptible scoundrel. What does this mean?!

LARRABEE:

I'll show you what it means cursÍd quick! (SHARP LOUD WHISTLE)

HOLMES:

(SYMPATHETIC) I'm afraid you're badly hurt, Miss Faulkner.

SOUND:

CREW RUSHES IN, IN BG

ALICE:

Mr. Holmes! Look! Behind you!

LARRABEE:

Get him!

SOUND:

CREW STOPS

HOLMES:

(PAUSE, POLITE) I'll have to ask you gentlemen to wait just one moment please.

CRAIGIN:

Here, there! What's the idea of sittin' down and writing?

LARRABEE:

What are you writing? Writing your will, I suppose.

HOLMES:

(CASUAL) No, no. Only a brief description of one or two of you gentlemen - for the police. (BEAT) I'm ready now.

CRAIGIN:

Wait a bit! You better listen to me, Mr. 'Olmes. We're gonna tie you down nice and tight to the top of that table.

HOLMES:

Why, you surprise me, gentlemen, thinking you're so sure of anybody in this room, and three bars gone out of that window.

LARRABEE:

Bars or no bars, you're not going to get out of here as easy as you expect!

HOLMES:

There are so many ways, Mr. Larrabee, that I hardly know which one to choose.

CRAIGIN:

Well, you'd better choose quick -- I can tell you that.

HOLMES:

I'll choose at once, Mr. Craigin -- and my choice falls on this -- chair.

SOUND:

BIG CRASH! AS HOLMES SMASHES LAMP WITH CHAIR ... FOLLOWING VOICES GROW INCREASINGLY DISTANT

CRAIGIN:

My God! The lights! He's gettin' away in the dark!

LEARY:

Stop! Look out!

LARRABEE:

Craigin! Look at his cigar!

CRAIGIN:

Trace 'im by the cigar!

LEARY:

Watch his cigar!

LARRABEE:

Look out! He's going for the window!

CRAIGIN:

He's up on the ledge! He's climbed up! Look at his cigar!

LARRABEE:

Get him, quick! After him!

CRAIGIN:

There he goes! He's up - by the window!

HOLMES:

(CLOSE ON MIKE, CASUAL) No, gentlemen, no. Not by the window. I'm leaving by the door. Uh, by the way, I left my cigar for you on the windowsill. Good evening, gentlemen. [Come along, Miss Faulkner.

SOUND:

DOOR SLAMS SHUT, BOLTS SLIDE SHUT, BARS DROP]

MUSIC:

WILDLY INTENSE, BRIEF BRIDGE

WATSON:

(NARRATES) There was no news of Holmes that night. And Billy reported next morning that he had not breakfasted at home. I had a busy morning at my office in Harley Street. It was after eleven before the last of my appointments was over, and still no news of Holmes.

SOUND:

WATSON RINGS HANDBELL ... DOOR OPENS

PARSONS:

Did you ring, Dr. Watson?

WATSON:

Oh, Parsons, is there anyone waiting? I have to be in Baker Street at noon.

PARSONS:

There's one person in the waiting room, doctor. A lady, sir, and she wants to see you most particular.

WATSON:

What about?

PARSONS:

She didn't say, sir. Only she said it was of the utmost importance to 'er, if you'd see 'er, sir.

WATSON:

Oh, very well -- I'll see her. And call a cab for me at the same time and have it wait. Show the lady in.

PARSONS:

Yes, sir.

SOUND:

PARSONS' FOOTSTEPS MOVE OFF

PARSONS:

(OFF, TO MADGE) This way, mum. This way.

SOUND:

FOOTSTEPS IN

MADGE:

(PRETENDS TO BE AN IMPETUOUS, GUSHING SOCIETY LADY) Ah, doctor! It's awfully good of you to see me. I'm Mrs. H. de Witte Seaton. Dear me -- I didn't bring my card-case -- or, if I did, I've lost it.

WATSON:

Don't trouble about a card, Mrs. Seaton.

MADGE:

They said you were Mr. Holmes's friend -- several people told me that, several. They advised me to ask you where I could find him to-day -- this morning -- and everything depends on it, doctor -- everything!

WATSON:

I'd go to Mr. Holmes at once.

MADGE:

But I've been. I've been and he wasn't there!

WATSON:

You went to Mr. Holmes's house?

MADGE:

Yes -- in Baker Street. That's why I came to you. They said he might be here.

WATSON:

No -- he isn't here.

MADGE:

But don't you expect him this morning?

WATSON:

No. There's no possibility of Mr. Holmes coming, as far as I know.

MADGE:

But couldn't you get him to come? It would be such a great favour to me -- I'm almost worn out with going about -- and with this dreadful anxiety! If you could get word to Mr. Holmes -- to come.

WATSON:

(IMPATIENT) I could not get him to come, madam. And I beg you to excuse me. I'm going out myself on urgent business. I have no idea where Mr. Holmes could be. I--

SOUND:

DURING ABOVE, A HORSE'S FAST HOOF BEATS APPROACH ON THE STREET OUTSIDE

1ST VOICE:

(OFF) Look out!

SOUND:

CRASH OF A CAPSIZING VEHICLE ON THE STREET ... FOLLOWED BY EXCITED MURMURS FROM STREET CROWD WHICH CONTINUE IN BG

WATSON:

(CALLS) What's that, Parsons?!

PARSONS:

It sounded like a haccident, sir.

WATSON:

Probably nothing more than a broken-down hansom.

SOUND:

DOOR BELL RINGS ... KNOCKS AT DOOR

WATSON:

See what it is, Parsons.

PARSONS:

If that's the bell, sir, somebody's 'urt, sir, and they're a-wantin' you!

WATSON:

Well, don't allow anybody to come in! I have no more time.

PARSONS:

Very well, sir.

MADGE:

But they're coming in, doctor!

SOUND:

CROWD MURMURS LOUDER

1ST VOICE:

Let the old man come in, can't yer?

2ND VOICE:

We 'ad to bring 'im in! There ain't nowhere else for 'im to go!

3RD VOICE:

What kind of a doctor's office is this when 'e can't come in when 'e's 'urt?!

PARSONS:

(PROTESTS) The doctor can't see anybody!

3RD VOICE:

He's got to come in! We cawn't leave 'im out in the street, can we?!

HOLMES:

(HOWLS IN PAIN, PRETENDING TO BE AN OBNOXIOUS OLD MAN WITH AN INJURY)

WATSON:

(RELENTS) All right. Help him in, Parsons.

MADGE:

Oh, doctor! Isn't it frightful?! Can I be of some use?

WATSON:

None whatever, madam.

MADGE:

But, doctor, I must see the poor fellow --

HOLMES:

Oh, my leg! My leg! (GROANS)

PARSONS:

Right this way, sir! Be careful of the sill, sir! That's it.

DRIVER:

It was a haccident. You cawn't 'elp a haccident.

HOLMES:

(ANGRY, TO DRIVER) You cawn't! That's plain enough!

DRIVER:

He was on the wrong side of the street, 'e was!

PARSONS:

Now over to this chair.

HOLMES: No, no! I'll sit here!

PARSONS:

No, no, this is the chair, sir.

HOLMES:

Don't you suppose I know where I want to sit down?!

DRIVER:

You'll sit down 'ere!

HOLMES:

But that isn't the doctor!

DRIVER:

Now, the doctor'll have a look at ye. 'Ere's the doctor.

HOLMES:

That isn't a doctor!

DRIVER:

Yes, it is a doctor. (TO WATSON) 'Ere, doctor, you just come and have a look at this old bloke, will ye? He's hurt 'isself a little, an' --

HOLMES:

Are you the cabman?

DRIVER:

Yes, I'm the cabman.

HOLMES:

Well, I'll have you arrested for this!

DRIVER:

Arrested?

HOLMES:

Arrested, arrested, arrested!

DRIVER:

You cawn't arrest me!

HOLMES:

No, I can't, but somebody else can! Where's my hat?! Where's my hat?! My hat! My hat!

DRIVER:

Never mind your 'at!

HOLMES:

I will mind my hat! And I'll hold you responsible!

DRIVER:

There's your 'at in your 'and. Go on, sit down.

HOLMES:

That isn't my hat! Here! You're responsible! I'll have you arrested! Here, come back!

DRIVER:

(MOVING OFF) I cawn't stick around 'ere, you know! I got to go and tend to me bleedin' hawse!

SOUND:

DOOR SLAMS OFF BEHIND--

HOLMES:

(CALLS AFTER HIM) Bring your horse in here! I want to speak to him! I-- (LAPSES INTO GROANS AND REMONSTRANCES, MUMBLING) It's a conspiracy. I won't stay in this place. If I ever get out of here alive-- What're ya starin' at me for, lady?

WATSON:

Parsons, tell that cab to wait for me. I must see if he's badly hurt.

PARSONS:

Yes, sir.

WATSON:

(TO HOLMES) Now, my friend, if you'll sit quiet for one moment, I'll have a look at you. Well, stay still, will you? Well, how can I--?

HOLMES:

(SLOWLY, HIS VOICE CHANGES FROM OLD TO YOUNG) Remarkable - remarkable weather, we're having, eh, doctor?

WATSON:

(BEAT) Holmes? What on earth--?

HOLMES:

How about helping me remove some of this ridiculous disguise, Watson?

WATSON:

Holmes! Is that you?

HOLMES:

Quite so, my dear fellow, quite so.

MADGE:

(THUNDERSTRUCK) Holmes?!

HOLMES:

Watson? Watson! Don't let her get at that window. Look out! The blind!

SOUND:

MADGE PULLS THE WINDOW BLIND ONCE

WATSON:

(CONFUSED) What do you want me to do?

HOLMES:

Nothing. It's already been done by Mrs. Larrabee here.

SOUND:

MADGE'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS

WATSON:

Look out, Holmes! She can get out that way.

HOLMES:

(CALM) I don't think so, Watson. (CALLS SHARPLY) Forman?!

SOUND:

MADGE'S FOOTSTEPS STOP ABRUPTLY ... SHE STRUGGLES BRIEFLY

FORMAN:

I've got her, sir!

HOLMES:

Good work, Forman. Now, take this lady in charge.

FORMAN:

Yes, sir.

HOLMES:

Very good, Forman. Wait for me outside.

FORMAN:

Yes, sir.

HOLMES:

(PAUSE, SIGHS) Ah, Watson, my dear fellow, I regret to say that up to the present time, Professor Moriarty himself has not risen to the bait.

WATSON:

Where do you think he is?

HOLMES:

In the open streets -- under some clever disguise -- watching for a chance to get at me.

WATSON:

And was this woman sent in here to--?

HOLMES:

Quite so, quite so. A spy -- to let them know, by some signal, if she found me in the house. Now they know. Pull down that blind, Watson. I don't care to be shot at from the street.

SOUND:

BLIND PULLED DOWN

HOLMES:

I imagine we shall hear from Professor Moriarty very soon now.

SOUND:

BILLY'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

BILLY:

(OFF) Mr. 'Olmes! Mr. 'Olmes!

HOLMES:

(TO WATSON) What did I tell you?

BILLY:

He's come, sir.

HOLMES:

From where?

BILLY:

The 'ouse across the street. He was in there a-watchin' these windows. He must 'ave seen somethin' for he's just come out. There was a cab waitin' in front of this 'ouse, sir, and he's climbed up and changed places with the driver!

HOLMES:

Get out again quick, Billy, and keep your eye on him.

BILLY:

Yes, sir! Thank you, sir!

SOUND:

BILLY'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS AWAY

HOLMES:

Watson, can you let me have a rather heavy portmanteau for a few moments? I won't do it any harm.

WATSON:

Parsons -- my large Gladstone over there in the corner -- bring it here, please.

PARSONS:

Yes, sir.

SOUND:

PARSONS' FOOTSTEPS, MOVING THE PORTMANTEAU ... IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--

PARSONS:

Here y'are, sir. Here's the portmanteau.

HOLMES:

Ah, thank you, Parsons. Put it down there. Thank you so much. Uh, Parsons, you ordered a cab for the doctor a short time ago. It's been waiting, I believe.

PARSONS:

Yes, sir, I think it 'as, sir.

HOLMES:

Be so good as to tell the driver to come in here and get a valise. When he comes, tell him that's the one.

PARSONS:

Very good, sir.

SOUND:

PARSONS' FOOTSTEPS AWAY

HOLMES:

(INCIDENTALLY) My dear Watson, in times like these, you should tell your man never to take the first cab that comes on call, nor yet the second. The third may be safe.

WATSON:

But, Holmes, I--

MORIARTY:

(APPROACHES, PRETENDS TO BE AN ANNOYED CABMAN) All right, I'm comin', I'm comin'!

PARSONS:

Yes, yes, cabbie -- right in, this way.

HOLMES:

(TO MORIARTY, CASUALLY) Ah, this bag I want taken down to the street.

MORIARTY:

Right you are, guv'nor, right you are.

HOLMES:

(ABSENTLY, TO MORIARTY) Oh, all right. (TO WATSON) Er, goodbye, Watson. Good-bye, Watson old fellow! (CALLS, TO MORIARTY) Er, wait a minute, driver! It's pretty heavy, I'm afraid. Let me help you. (TO WATSON) Er, Watson, I'll write to you from Budapest.

WATSON:

Yes, yes, but, Holmes--

HOLMES:

Here, driver. Just let me tighten up these straps a bit. There we are, that's right. I'll hold it, driver. You pull the strap. A few little things in this bag that I wouldn't like to lose ...

MORIARTY:

Right you are, sir.

HOLMES:

... and it's just as well to make quite sure. Is it not, Professor Moriarty ...

SOUND:

LOUD CLICK OF HANDCUFFS

HOLMES:

... by means of a simple pair of handcuffs?

SOUND:

[VIOLENT RATTLE OF CUFFS AS MORIARTY TRIES VAINLY TO BREAK FREE]

MORIARTY:

Blast you, Holmes! (EXHALES IN FRUSTRATION) Do you imagine, Sherlock Holmes, that this is the end?

HOLMES:

I ventured to dream that it might be.

MORIARTY:

Are you quite sure the police will be able to hold me?

HOLMES:

Professor Moriarty, I am quite sure of nothing. Take him away, Forman.

MUSIC:

TRIUMPHANT BRIDGE

HOLMES:

And so, my dear Watson, ends the strange case of Miss Alice Faulkner.

WATSON:

Well, what about the letters?

HOLMES:

Oh, the letters. They were returned to their rightful owner over an hour ago. I suspected from the start that Miss Faulkner was really a nice girl at heart. (A SAD SIGH) Oh, dear.

WATSON:

What is it, Holmes?

HOLMES:

(UNENTHUSIASTIC) I was just reflecting, my dear Watson. With Moriarty out of the way, London -- from the point of view of the criminal expert -- is likely to become a singularly uninteresting city; one's morning paper a veritable wilderness of boredom--

SOUND:

BILLY'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

BILLY:

(OFF) Mr. 'Olmes! Mr. 'Olmes!

HOLMES:

Yes, Billy?

BILLY:

It's a lady, sir. Been waitin' for an hour. Says she's got to see you, sir. Case o' murder, she says. She's got her face veiled!

HOLMES:

(ENTHUSIASTIC AGAIN) From which I deduce that she is a lady of over forty-one and less than forty-five; of a strange, dark beauty and considerable social eminence; and that she has lived for some years in the Near East; and that she is now wearing a large blood ruby on the second finger of her left hand.

WATSON:

Holmes! How do you know these things?! It's amazing.

HOLMES:

Heh. Elementary, my dear Watson, elementary. The child's play of deduction.

MUSIC:

TO A FINISH ... CONTINUES IN BG, OUT AT [X]

ANNOUNCER:

Again tonight, the Columbia Broadcasting System, through its affiliated stations coast-to-coast, has brought you Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air, the twelfth production in this unique series featuring Broadway's, and radio's, most celebrated theatrical producing company. This evening, the play was Orson Welles' own adaptation of William Gillette's "Sherlock Holmes." [X]

In the cast -- Dr. Watson, played by Ray Collins; Alice Faulkner by Mary Taylor; Madge Larrabee by Brenda Forbes; James Larrabee by Edgar Barrier; Inspector Forman by Morgan Farley; Craigin by Richard Wilson; Bassick by Alfred Shirley; Leary by William Alland; Billy by Arthur Anderson; Professor Moriarty by Eustace Wyatt; and Sherlock Holmes by Orson Welles. The orchestra was conducted by Bernard Herrmann and the production was supervised for CBS by Davidson Taylor. Your announcer is Frank Gallop.

MUSIC:

MERCURY THEME ... CONTINUES IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

Next Sunday evening at this same time, another classic narrative dramatized by Orson Welles. Join us then for Charles Dickens' "Oliver Twist," brought to life by the Mercury Theatre on the Air.

MUSIC:

QUICKLY FADES OUT

CBS ANNCR:

Columbia continues its extensive coverage of the European crisis. At this time, we present a brief summary of the latest developments of the day on the European continent, as brought to us by the Press Radio Bureau.

No more concessions to Adolf Hitler. That is the understanding which has flashed through the nations of Europe tonight following the meeting of the British and French government heads and a further meeting of the British cabinet. The United Press learns on high authority that the French and British conferees have agreed not to ask Czechoslovakia to go further than the original French-British proposal which was adopted one week ago tonight.

In the meantime, according to reliable reports, the new government of Czechoslovakia has definitely rejected the Hitler memorandum which was transmitted to Prague by British Prime Minister Chamberlain without recommendations. The text of Czechoslovakia's answer to the memorandum, which required evacuation of the Sudeten areas by October first, has not yet been issued. But the memorandum which Chamberlain submitted was given out earlier today.

The French and British statesmen will resume their joint conference in London, at ten o'clock tomorrow morning, London time, which will be four o'clock Eastern Standard Time in America. At that time, it is understood they will have before them the full text of Czechoslovakia's answer, which is already been communicated to them in substance by the Czech Minister Jan Masaryk and, at the same time, they will confer on a joint plan of war operations to be put into effect on the instant that Hitler decides to invade Czechoslovakia.

It is not certain that Hitler will make this decision, even if Czechoslovakia closes the door to further negotiations. Hitler's attitude may not be known until tomorrow evening in Berlin when the German leader is to address a great mass meeting in the Sports Palace. The entire German nation has been instructed by the Nazi propaganda department to listen to this address. Hitler is due to speak at 8 o'clock, Berlin time; two o'clock tomorrow afternoon, Eastern Standard Time, which will be broadcast by the Columbia network.

In the meantime, German troops are pouring through German Austria toward the Czech frontier and, in the Sudeten borderland, the Sudeten "free corps" troops, now occupying the town of Asch, have moved closer to the positions of the Czech army. Refugees from Czechoslovakia are streaming across the border into Germany. These are mostly Germans but one group of refugees were Americans from Prague who had expected to take a train from the city of Eger into Germany.

And here is still later word from London. The Czechoslovakian answer to the Hitler memorandum is -- a memorandum to the British government and not to Hitler. The Czechs take the position that no formal reply to Hitler is required since the Hitler memorandum was not addressed to the Czech government but was merely handed by Hitler to Chamberlain for delivery to the Czechs. In the same way, it is the expectation of Czechoslovakia, according to the United Press, that Chamberlain will transmit a memorandum from the Czechs to Hitler.

We wish to call to your attention that, at ten p. m., Eastern Standard Time, over most of these stations, Columbia will again present another European round-up from Paris, London, and again from Prague. Also, at ten-thirty p. m., Eastern Standard Time, the feature news program "Headlines and Bylines" will be heard.

This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.