Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Lux Radio Theater
Show: Stage Door
Date: Feb 20 1939

CAST:

The Lux Team:
Melville Ruick, announcer
Cecil B. DeMille, host-narrator
Bill (in commercial)
Betty (in commercial)
George "Empire" Pierce, intermission guest

The Boardinghouse Team:
Terry Randall/Rosalind Russell
Jean Maitland/Ginger Rogers
Anthony Powell/Adolphe Menjou
Linda Shaw, Jean's catty rival
Ann, Jean's dance partner
Kaye Hamilton, the tragic one
Mrs. Orcutt, who runs the boardinghouse
Mrs. Ann Luther, the veteran actress
Eve, the sarcastic one
Mary Lou, heavy Southern accent
Judy, from Seattle, dates lumbermen
Susan, New York accent

Friends of Anthony Powell:
Harcourt, Powell's butler
Ellsworth, the critic
Korovsky, Russian dance teacher
Miss Winters, Powell's secretary/switchboard operator
Carmichael, the financier
Mother (in play)
Father (in play)

The Loved Ones:
Bill, Jean's love interest
Henry Sims, Terry's father

The General Atmosphere:
Waiter, serving Sims
Usher, at the theater
Reporter
Man, in Powell's office
Man Number Two
Man Number Three
Man Number Four
Woman



MFX:

FANFARE

ANNOUNCER:

From Hollywood, California, the Lux Radio Theatre presents Ginger Rogers, Rosalind Russell, and Adolphe Menjou in "Stage Door"!

MFX:

LUX THEME ... CONTINUES IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

Lux presents Hollywood! This is a drama of Broadway -- of the tears and joys, the struggles and romance of a group of girls battling for recognition behind the footlights. Starring are Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou and Rosalind Russell, and with Eve Arden. Conducting our orchestra is Louis Silvers and, between the acts, you'll hear one of Broadway's famous characters, George Pierce, stage doorman of the Empire Theater.

Before introducing our producer, a word about the product bringing you this hour of entertainment. Out here in Hollywood, nine out of ten screen stars use Lux Toilet Soap. They use it regularly, in their studio dressing rooms, and at home, too. When a screen star whose complexion is priceless uses an inexpensive soap like Lux Toilet Soap, you can be sure there's a reason. And here it is: Lux Toilet Soap is skillfully made of the finest possible ingredients. More important, Lux Toilet Soap has active lather that offers you protection against careless cleansing. Let Hollywood's beauty soap be your beauty soap and help you protect the priceless loveliness of your complexion.

And now, the producer of the Lux Radio Theatre -- ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Cecil B. DeMille!

MFX:

LUX THEME UP AND OUT

SFX:

APPLAUSE

DEMILLE:

Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. It's about twenty-five years ago that a church worker, making a sick call on a young actress living in the theatrical district of New York City, noticed a pistol on the dresser. When the girl told her the neighborhood was so tough that she needed the weapon for protection, her visitor determined to do something about it. From that determination came a theatrical club -- two brownstone buildings in the West Fifties -- the real-life background of our play; the home of hopeful young actresses who find New York a hard and lonely city.

Here, Edna Ferber got her inspiration, and collaborating with George S. Kaufman, gave Broadway the resounding hit "Stage Door." When RKO brought "Stage Door" to the screen, it rediscovered one of its own stars, Ginger Rogers. Her nimble feet and appealing voice had carried her to fame in musical romances. Then came the part of Jean Maitland, which established her as one of our best dramatic actresses, and which she repeats tonight. She co-stars on the screen shortly with Fred Astaire in "The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle." Also from the original film cast comes that master of sophisticated charm, Mr. Adolphe Menjou, in the part of the theatrical producer Anthony Powell. Mr. Menjou stars soon in the United Artists release "King of the Turf." Making her first appearance at our microphone is Miss Rosalind Russell, Connecticut girl who came to Hollywood by way of stock companies and Broadway. Following her success in "The Citadel," her new
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture is "Fast and Loose," co-starring Robert Montgomery. And she's heard tonight in the part of Terry Randall. Eve Arden plays Linda Shaw. And now, the Lux Radio Theatre presents Ginger Rogers, Rosalind Russell, and Adolphe Menjou in "Stage Door."


MFX: FOR AN INTRO ... "MANHATTAN SERENADE" ... THEN IN BG

DEMILLE:

Broadway is a mighty stream: sparkling, swift and unfathomable; rushing on mercilessly; swollen with an overflow of talent from all the other little Broadways, the Main Streets of America. But, along the course of every roaring torrent, there are backwaters, pools and eddies -- where the driftwood collects. Such a backwater is the Footlights Club, a girls' theatrical boardinghouse just off Broadway, just around the corner from Fame.

MFX:

CHANGES TO BOARDINGHOUSE PIANO, CONTINUES IN BG

DEMILLE:

In the old-fashioned living room of the club, the girls are gathered just before dinner. The air's thick with talk -- shop talk and women's talk. On the overstuffed sofa sits Jean Maitland. Jean is a dancer, when she works. But she's been at liberty for the last six months. She polishes her nails calmly, ignoring the conversation that flies about her.

SFX:

WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES

SUSAN:

Lamb's stew for dinner. I'll bet it's awful.

JUDY:

Yeah.

ANN:

Well, it couldn't be any worse than it was last night.

JUDY:

No.

EVE:

Yeah, no better than tomorrow night.

MARY LOU:

Can anybody lend me a lipstick?

JUDY:

How was the matinee, Susan?

SUSAN:

Oh, very intimate. We had a hundred people on the stage and fifty in the audience.

JUDY:

Well, at least you had 'em outnumbered.

SUSAN:

(DISGUSTED) Five weeks' rehearsal and two weeks' pay.

ANN:

What's the matter? Is the show closing?

SUSAN:

Like a tired clam.

ANN:

Oh, that's awful. Jean, did you hear that? Susan's show is folding.

JEAN:

Yeah, and if any more fold, we can all move right into the storehouse with the scenery.

LINDA:

Good evening, hags!

JEAN:

(MOCK GRACIOUS) Oh, there you are, Miss Shaw.

LINDA:

(MATCHING HER) Were you speaking to me, Miss Maitland? I'm just on my way out.

JEAN:

(TOUGH, BLUNT) Come on. Take 'em off.

LINDA:

What?

JEAN:

You heard what I said. Take off my stockings.

LINDA:

What stockings?

JEAN:

If you don't take 'em off, I will, and I'll take some of the hide right off with 'em!

JUDY:

(CALLS, CASUALLY) Oh, Mrs. Orcutt! Jean and Linda are fighting again!

JEAN:

From now on, you can wear your own stockings or go bare-legged!

LINDA:

Oh, is that so?

JEAN:

Yes, that's so. (WITH DISGUST) Stretching my size eight over your big clodhopper twelve!

MRS. ORCUTT:

Girls, girls, what's the trouble?

LINDA:

This hoyden accused me of stealing my own stockings.

SFX:

FROM OFF, PHONE RINGS, IS PICKED UP, MUFFLED CONVERSATION ... IN BG

JEAN:

She's swiped her last pair of stockings from me.

MRS. ORCUTT:

(ADMONISHES) Oh, Jean, Linda! How do you expect me to run a respectable boardinghouse--

JEAN:

Eh, you're doing the best you can with the people you've got.

MRS. ORCUTT:

(ADMONISHES) Jean!

SUSAN:

(OFF) Oh, Linda! Mr. Powell's car is here.

LINDA:

Oh. Well, tell the chauffeur I'll be right there.

JEAN:

Well, well, Mr. Powell's car is here! Mr. Powell, the great producer, isn't here, just his car.

LINDA:

Well, if you were more considerate of your elders, maybe Mr. Powell would send his car for you some day.

JEAN:

I can hardly wait.

LINDA:

Course, he'd probably take one look at you and send you right back again. But then you have to expect that.

JEAN:

Well, you should know.

LINDA:

Well, good night, everyone. While you're sitting here, digesting your lamb stew, you might be thinking of me, dining on pheasant bordelaise.

JEAN:

Bordelaise, no less! Whoo, girls, listen! Bordelaise!

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

LINDA:

(MOVING OFF) Well, maybe it's casserole. I'm not quite certain.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

JEAN:

(CALLS AFTER HER) Well, be sure not to eat the bones and give yourself away!

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

SFX:

DOOR SHUTS

SUSAN:

I'd say that bout was a draw, Jean.

EVE:

Break it up, girls. That's the end of Round One!

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

SFX:

KNOCKING AT DOOR

MRS. ORCUTT:

Girls, what's that knocking?

JEAN:

It might be mice.

SFX:

KNOCKING AT DOOR

MRS. ORCUTT:

Why, it's someone at the side door.

TERRY:

(FROM BEHIND DOOR) Say! How do you get in here?!

JEAN:

(CALLS) If you really want to get in, you might blast!

MRS. ORCUTT:

Oh, don't, Jean. It looks like a customer. (CALLS, PLEASANTLY) Uh, go around to the other door, please!

JEAN:

'S'matter with her? Can't she read?

SFX:

DOOR BELL RINGS

JEAN:

The mice are still with us.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

MRS. ORCUTT:

Uh, this way. Come right in.

TERRY:

Thanks.

SFX:

DOOR SHUTS

TERRY:

(TO ALL, FRIENDLY) Good evening!

WOMEN:

Hello.

EVE:

Greetings.

TERRY:

(LIGHTLY) How many doors are there to this place?

JEAN:

Well, there's the trap door, the humidor and the cuspidor. How many doors would you like?

WOMEN:

(GIGGLE)

TERRY:

(SOBERLY) I only asked a civil question. I'd like to see someone about accommodations, if you don't mind.

JEAN:

Oh, I don't mind. Miz Orcutt's the keeper on duty.

MRS. ORCUTT:

(FRIENDLY) Yes, I'm the one you see. You mustn't mind Jean.

TERRY:

(COOLLY) Evidently, Jean's a very amusing person.

JEAN:

Whoo! (MOVING OFF) If you young ladies will pardon me, I shall take the wolfhounds for a stroll through the park.

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

TERRY:

This is a theatrical boarding house, isn't it?

MRS. ORCUTT:

It's considered one of the finest. Now, let me see what I have available.

TERRY:

I'd like a room with a private bath.

WOMEN:

Ooh! (LAUGH)

TERRY:

(TO THE WOMEN) Well, is there anything so strange in that request?

MRS. ORCUTT:

Oh, you mustn't mind the girls. They're just full of fun. We're just a great big happy family.

ANN:

(IRONIC) Ohhhh, yeah.

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

TERRY:

How expensive are your rooms?

MRS. ORCUTT:

Thirteen dollars if you share a room. In advance. That includes breakfast and dinner but not luncheon.

TERRY:

(SURPRISED) You mean meals are included for that money?

MRS. ORCUTT:

Yes, indeed, and I must say we have a very fine kitchen.

WOMEN:

(LAUGH) Wheeee!

MRS. ORCUTT:

(ADMONISHES) Girls, girls!

TERRY:

What shall I do about my baggage? I'm expecting a few trunks.

MRS. ORCUTT:

Why, I'll have them taken care of, Miss uh--?

TERRY:

Randall. Terry Randall.

MRS. ORCUTT:

Miss Randall. Now, let me see. I have only one vacancy. You'll have to share a room with, uh, with Jean.

TERRY:

Jean? You mean the girl who made all those remarks--?

MRS. ORCUTT:

Oh, I'm sure you'll like the room. It's very bright. (MOVING OFF) Er, come this way, Miss Randall. This way.

MFX:

BRIDGE


JEAN: (FADES IN) One trunk. Two trunks. Three trunks. (IRONIC) When does your baggage get here, Miss Randall?

TERRY:

(MATCHES HER) I'm expecting the bulk of it in the morning.

JEAN:

Mm. We could leave the trunks here and sleep in the hall. There's no use crowding the trunks.

TERRY:

Yes, yes. I don't know what we're going to do when the wolfhounds arrive. I hope you don't mind animals.

JEAN:

No, not at all. I've roomed with a great many of 'em before.

TERRY:

Yes, I can see that.

JEAN:

Do you mind if I ask a personal question?

TERRY:

Another one?

JEAN:

Are these trunks full of bodies?

TERRY:

Just those two. But I don't intend to unpack them.

JEAN:

Oh. I was just thinking if the room got too crowded we could live in the trunks.

TERRY:

Now, that's a good idea. You don't mind helping me unpack, do you? Oh, I beg your pardon. You're not the maid, are you?

JEAN:

Oh, it's quite all right.

TERRY:

And may I put this picture here?

JEAN:

Why not? May help scare the moths away. An old friend of the family?

TERRY:

It happens to be my grandfather.

JEAN:

Grandfather? Well, there is quite a resemblance, especially around the whiskers.

TERRY:

Now, that's a fairly intelligent observation - for you.

JEAN:

Judging from your wardrobe, I'd say he was a fairly generous old guy, as grandfathers go.

TERRY:

He always treated me very well.

JEAN:

Hm. I suppose if you'd had your choice, you'd have picked a much younger grandfather.

TERRY:

I see that in addition to your other charms, you have the insolence generated by an inferior upbringing.

JEAN:

(HIGH-TONED ACCENT) Ooh, fancy clothes, fancy language, and everything! Do you mind if I hang your dress here? On the floor? Temporarily, of course. I must take my bath.

TERRY:

That should help.

JEAN:

(MOVING OFF) And remember, half the wardrobe is yours and if anything of mine should get in the way, why, just toss it out the window.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS ... JEAN'S FOOTSTEPS DOWN THE HALL ... THEN JEAN RATTLES BATHROOM DOORKNOB ... KNOCKS ON BATHROOM DOOR

JEAN:

Hey! Who's in the bath?

MARY LOU:

It's me, honey, Mary Lou!

JEAN:

Well, hurry up! That's still a community tub, you know.

MARY LOU:

I'll hurry.

SFX:

KAYE'S FOOTSTEPS DOWN HALL

JEAN:

Hello, Kaye. (NO ANSWER) Kaye?!

SFX:

KAYE'S FOOTSTEPS STOP

KAYE:

Oh.

JEAN:

Hey, what's the matter, Kaye? Don't you say hello to me anymore?

KAYE:

Hello, Jean. I didn't see you. I just got in. I'm tired.

JEAN:

Well, you certainly musta heard me.

KAYE:

Oh, don't pay any attention to me. My mind's been wandering lately.

JEAN:

What's the matter, Kaye?

KAYE:

Oh, it's just one of those days. Let's sit down and have a good cry.

JEAN:

All right. Cry on my shoulder. I'm gonna take a bath anyhow. What's wrong?

KAYE:

No casting today. "If you'll leave your name and number, we'll get in touch with you. Mr. Powell is not seeing anyone until the end of the week." Last week and the week before, and the week before that. Somewhere, somehow, I had the idea that I was a pretty good actress.

JEAN:

Come on, shake out of it. Who got all those rave notices a year ago?

KAYE:

That was a year ago.

JEAN:

Ooh, you do sound gloomy.

KAYE:

I don't know why I'm hanging on. There's nothing else I can do and nobody I can go back to. Except somebody I'll never go back to.

JEAN:

Listen, you don't have to go back to anybody. Why, you're the only good actress in this club. Something's bound to come your way.

KAYE:

I hope so.

JEAN:

Now, look, Kaye. I don't want to butt into your private affairs but if it's a matter of a few bucks--

KAYE:

(SUDDENLY PASSIONATE) Oh, Jean, I've got to get that part in "Enchanted April." It's me. It's my life. No one else can play that part. It belongs to me. I've got to get it; it just can't be otherwise. (BREAKS DOWN AND CRIES) I've got to. I've just got to. (CONTINUES TO SOB IN BG)

JEAN:

Honey, all right. All right, now, come on, snap out of it. Honey, there's somebody coming. Now, go on into your room and I'll see you later. Go on, baby.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS ... JUDY'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

JUDY:

Jean! Hey, Jean!

JEAN:

What do you want?

JUDY:

Jean, do you want a date?

JEAN:

Some more of those lumber men of yours?

JUDY:

Well, yeah, but--

JEAN:

That last couple we went stepping with were made of lumber. Especially their feet.

JUDY:

All right, don't. But it's not too late for dinner and they haven't had theirs yet.

JEAN:

Wait a minute. Did you say dinner?

JUDY:

Yeah!

JEAN:

Oh! Well, why didn't you say so before you spoke?

SFX:

JEAN RATTLES BATHROOM DOORKNOB, KNOCKS ON DOOR

JEAN:

Hey, Mary Lou! Get out of that tub! What do you think you are, a trained seal?

MFX:

BRIDGE


SFX: CLOCK FINISHES CHIMING THE HOUR ... WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES IN BG

SUSAN:

(YAWNS) Nine o'clock and all's quiet.

EVE:

Too darn quiet for me.

ANN:

Hey, where's Jean?

EVE:

Out -- with the lumbering lumbermen.

MRS. LUTHER:

(MUCH OLDER THAN THE OTHERS) Oh, er, Miss Randall?

TERRY:

Yes?

MRS. LUTHER:

I thought we ought to get acquainted. I'm one of the girls here, too.

TERRY:

Oh?

MRS. LUTHER:

Ann Luther is my name. Are you of the theater?

TERRY:

Not yet, but I hope to be.

MRS. LUTHER:

With the proper coaching, you need not despair. (CLEARS THROAT) In fact, if I don't find a play worthy of my talents, I may do a little coaching myself.

TERRY:

Really?

MRS. LUTHER:

I can't tell you how interesting I found your discussion of "Twelfth Night" at the dinner table.

TERRY:

Thank you. I don't think the rest of the inmates shared your enthusiasm.

EVE:

Hang on to your chairs, girls. We're in for more Shakespeare.

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

TERRY:

Is it against the rules of the Footlights Club to discuss the classics?

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

TERRY:

The trouble with you girls is, is you're all comics. Don't you ever take anything seriously?

ANN:

After you've sat around for a year trying to get a job, you won't take anything seriously either.

TERRY:

Do you have to just sit around and do nothing about it? You think you're facing difficulties. Why, what do you think of the men who crossed the Rockies?

ANN:

Did any of 'em crash a manager's office?

TERRY:

No, but if they'd wanted to, I'm sure they could have done it; and I'll bet I can, too.

EVE:

Maybe she can get through the door with vanishing cream.

TERRY:

Maybe I can!

LINDA:

Did you say you'd bet, Miss Randall?

TERRY:

I - I meant it figuratively.

LINDA:

I'd rather have a lunch.

TERRY:

All right. Anyone else?

WOMEN:

(AGREEMENT) Yeah. Sure. I'll take a lunch.

LINDA:

You'll crash a manager's office. How long?

ANN:

Give her a week.

TERRY:

A week is enough. Name your manager.

LINDA:

Ummm. Anthony Powell.

TERRY:

Powell? The Anthony Powell?

LINDA:

Why not?

TERRY:

(BEAT) All right. Why not?

SFX:

WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES FADES OUT


SFX: FADE IN ON CLOCK CHIMING ... ROOM DOOR OPENS

TERRY:

Hello.

JEAN:

(EXHAUSTED) Hello.

SFX:

ROOM DOOR SHUTS

JEAN:

How are all your folks?

TERRY:

What happened to you? You're limping.

JEAN:

Am I? Did you ever dance with one of those lumbermen Romeos?

TERRY:

(CHUCKLES) Maybe. I don't remember.

JEAN:

Well, if you did, you'd remember it, all right.

TERRY:

Well, why do you go out with them?

JEAN:

I'll bite. Why do I? They not only step all over you, but they bore you to death. They-- Why am I telling you all this?

TERRY:

Why not? We're going to share the same room. Why not share our troubles?

JEAN:

(BRUSQUE) We started off on the wrong foot. Let's stay that way.

TERRY:

Oh, don't you ever stop quarreling?

JEAN:

'S'matter? Can't you take it?

TERRY:

I can take it if you want it that way.

JEAN:

Sure. Why not? (STRETCHES AND YAWNS) Oh, I hope you like your bed. It's the worst of the two.

TERRY:

Thanks. May I ask a humble question?

JEAN:

If you ask it in English.

TERRY:

You're probably wondering why I'm living here.

JEAN:

Maybe I am. Why don't you sell some of those fancy clothes you've got and live in a decent place?

TERRY:

Isn't this a decent place? Besides, I've always wanted to be in an atmosphere like this.

JEAN:

Sister, you haven't seen atmosphere. Wait until about six in the morning when those garbage trucks start around.

TERRY:

(CRACKS UP WITH LAUGHTER)

JEAN:

Say, am I getting good, or are you getting weak?

TERRY:

It struck me funny.

JEAN:

What did?

TERRY:

The idea of having a garbage truck for an alarm clock.

JEAN:

Well, it's not funny to me. If I had your wardrobe, I'd scram out of here plenty fast and leave you here with your atmosphere.

TERRY:

Oh, no, you wouldn't. You bark a lot, but you don't bite. You wouldn't sell out for a wardrobe.

JEAN:

It's all right for you to talk. You've got yours. And Linda isn't doing so bad, either.

TERRY:

Linda? Oh, she's the other girl you fight with, eh?

JEAN:

One of 'em. Well, you two probably have the right idea, I don't know.

TERRY:

What idea is that?

JEAN:

Stop kidding.

TERRY:

Oh. Oh, you mean having a grandfather, eh?

JEAN:

Ah, call him anything you like.

TERRY:

If I had to do it all over again, I assure you I wouldn't have had a grandfather.

JEAN:

(SIGHS AS SHE SNUGGLES AGAINST PILLOW)

TERRY:

Perhaps if I came in here today with a hungry look in my eyes and a straw suitcase, you'd think I was all right, huh? But a wardrobe won't help you to act. And three meals a day, of course, well, it's just a bad habit. However, that's hardly a reason for the girls to dislike me. (PAUSE) Jean? (NO ANSWER) Jean? Are you listening?

JEAN:

(HALF ASLEEP) Write it down on a piece of paper. I'll read it in the morning.

MFX:

TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In a few moments, the curtain will rise on the second act of "Stage Door" starring Ginger Rogers, Rosalind Russell, and Adolphe Menjou. And now, during our intermission, let us listen in on Bill and Betty. They're going to be married in June, and now:

BETTY:

Good night, Bill. You really must go now.

BILL:

Oh, gosh, Betty. Not just yet. Aw, it's wonderful to hold you close. You're awful nice to look at, you know.

BETTY:

But, Bill, you must go.

BILL:

All right, I suppose I must. But, gee, darling, I could look at you like this forever.

ANNOUNCER:

Betty's one of those clever girls who uses Lux Toilet Soap regularly, and has skin that passes the "Love Test." When a man's in love, his eyes look close and searchingly. Only skin that's soft and smooth can pass the Test. If you have one romance and want to hold it, take the screen stars' advice. They tell you it's foolish to risk cosmetic skin, dullness, tiny blemishes, enlarged pores. Use cosmetics all you like. Lux Toilet Soap's Active Lather removes stale cosmetics thoroughly, guards against choked pores. We use this nice white soap regularly. Have you discovered what this soap nine out of ten screen stars [use] can do for your skin? ... Here's Mr. DeMille.

DEMILLE:

We continue with "Stage Door" starring Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou and Rosalind Russell.


MFX: FOR A BRIEF INTRO ... "MANHATTAN SERENADE" ... THEN IN BG

DEMILLE:

Almost a week has gone by. Terry Randall, unable to make friends with the girls at the Footlights Club, pursues the uncertain path to fame alone. Jean Maitland, still out of a job, practices daily at Alex Korovsky's dancing school.

MFX:

CHANGES TO SOLO PIANO AND TAP DANCE ROUTINE ... CONTINUES IN BG

DEMILLE:

With her partner Ann, she's working out a routine in a corner of the room when through the door comes the famous producer, Linda's friend, Anthony Powell.

KOROVSKY:

(RUSSIAN ACCENT) Well, well, well, Mr. Powell! How are you, Mr. Powell?

POWELL:

I'm fine, Alex. How's the new school?

KOROVSKY:

Oh, fine, fine. You thinking of putting on a musical?

POWELL:

No, I very likely won't produce anything this year. Unless I can find an angel. Say, who's the little blonde over there?

KOROVSKY:

Hm? Oh, just one of the kids. You want to meet her?

POWELL:

Never mind. (MOVING OFF) I'll introduce myself.

MFX:

PIANO AND TAP DANCE GROW LOUDER

ANN:

(WHILE DANCING) Hey. Jean. Look who's giving us the once over.

JEAN:

Who is it?

ANN:

Nobody but Anthony Powell.

JEAN:

So that's Linda's soul mate. Who's he staring at?

ANN:

I don't know. (SQUEAKS) I hope it's me.

JEAN:

Ah, you can have him.

POWELL:

Morning! Are you girls rehearsing for a musical?

JEAN:

No, we're just getting over the DTs.

MFX:

PIANO AND TAP DANCE STOP

POWELL:

That's a nice routine you kids have got there.

JEAN:

I hear yours isn't so bad, either. (MOVING OFF) See you in the dressing room, Ann.

POWELL:

What's the matter with your girlfriend?

ANN:

(NERVOUS) Oh, she's just, er-- Er, just nervous. Meeting such a great man, you know.

POWELL:

(CHUCKLES) Do you two girls expect to go on the stage?

ANN:

Oh, well, we're just hoofing around. Waiting for someone to discover us.

POWELL:

Well, you're discovered.

ANN:

Hm! Oh. Oh! Er, well, I - I - I didn't mean it that way. You see, we thought, maybe, you know, we might get into a nightclub like the Grotto.

POWELL:

The Grotto?

ANN:

Yeah. You know, someplace like that. Heh. You know. Heh. Well, uh, excuse me. I guess you're getting me nervous, too. Excuse me. Good bye!

POWELL:

(LAUGHS)

KOROVSKY:

Nice little routine those kids have, Mr. Powell.

POWELL:

Yes. Say, Alex?

KOROVSKY:

Hmm?

POWELL:

Call up Gordon at the Club Grotto. Tell him I said to give the kids a job.

KOROVSKY:

The Grotto? Swell.


MFX: NIGHTCLUB BAND ... AND TAP DANCE ROUTINE ... TO A CLIMAX, THEN OUT

SFX:

NIGHTCLUB PATRONS CHEER AND APPLAUD

ANN:

(OUT OF BREATH) Gee, Jean, that wasn't so bad.

JEAN:

(OUT OF BREATH) Oh, it wasn't so good, either. Did you see who was sitting out there?

ANN:

Sure. Our friend, Miss Linda Shaw.

JEAN:

And her friend, Mr. Powell.

ANN:

Well, what of it? I heard tonight that Powell owns half-interest in this club.

JEAN:

Oh! You know it did strike me kind of funny our getting a job here all of a sudden like that.

ANN:

Nahh, don't be a dope.

JEAN:

Ah!

ANN:

Say, if he ever smiled at me the way he did at you tonight, I'd do a three-point collapse.

POWELL:

Hello. May I come in?

ANN:

Oh, uh, how do you do, Mr. Powell?

POWELL:

I thought you girls were very good tonight.

JEAN:

(COOLLY) Thank you. We thought so, too.

ANN:

(CHUCKLES NERVOUSLY) Don't pay any attention to her, Mr. Powell. She's slightly balmy. (MOVING OFF) Well, excuse me, Mr. Powell.

POWELL:

You don't like me, do you?

JEAN:

How could I help liking a man who takes his mother out to a nightclub? That was your mother you were sitting with?

POWELL:

No. No, that was my girlfriend's mother. Now, my ideal mother is young, blonde, slim and, uh, generally intriguing.

JEAN:

I'll see if I can get you one on Mother's Day. What size?

POWELL:

Your size.

JEAN:

Well, that wouldn't be so easy. You see, I'm not the stock size.

POWELL:

Couldn't we talk the whole thing over at dinner some night?

JEAN:

Mmm, I'm very fond of dinner. Could you send your car around for me?

POWELL:

Where could I send it?

JEAN:

I'm living at the Footlights Club. But the traffic around there is a little heavy.

POWELL:

Mm, I see.

JEAN:

So maybe you'd better send it around here first.

POWELL:

Perhaps that would be better.

JEAN:

Uh huh.

POWELL:

Shall we say, er, tomorrow night, after the show?

JEAN:

Mama will have a lamp in the window.

POWELL:

Good night.

MFX:

BRIDGE


SFX: WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES

JEAN:

Hey, girls! Who's got a fur cape they're not using tonight?

JUDY:

You're a little early, Jean.

JEAN:

I know but I want to get a lien on it this morning. I got a date for dinner.

MARY LOU:

Terry Randall's got one.

JEAN:

I know. Well, where is she?

JUDY:

Out to lunch. Free, too. A fella just called for her.

JEAN:

Oh! Grandpa?

JUDY:

Well, I'd say he was a little young for "grandpa" but I liked his car. (FADES OUT)


MFX: RESTAURANT ORCHESTRA ... "THANKS FOR EVERYTHING" ... IN BG

WAITER:

Will there be anything else, Monsieur?

SIMS:

No, that's all.

WAITER:

Very good, Monsieur.

SIMS:

So your decision is final, is it, Terry?

TERRY:

Yes, Dad. It's final.

SIMS:

I'm sorry, my dear. I thought by now that you would have satisfied this silly whim of yours and been ready to come back home.

TERRY:

Hmph! If I thought I couldn't achieve anything by myself without the aid of the family millions, I'd feel like a pretty sorry specimen.

SIMS:

But why must it be the stage, Terry? There are other things to achieve in life.

TERRY:

I don't know, Dad. It - it just happens to appeal to me.

SIMS:

You've got the family name to consider.

TERRY:

Oh, don't worry about the family name. So far as New York is concerned Terry Randall is just another stage-struck girl from the Middle West. They don't know me from Eve. But they're going to, if I have anything to say about it.

SIMS:

And if you are to fail? Then what?

TERRY:

If I'm a failure, I'll be the first to admit it.

SIMS:

Then you would come home if you failed?

TERRY:

Would you have me?

SIMS:

(AMUSED) Well, you're pretty stubborn, but you're still my favorite daughter. Let's leave it at that.

TERRY:

Oh! What time is it?

SIMS:

It's almost three.

TERRY:

Oh, Dad, I've got to run. I've got a bet with the girls that I couldn't crash a manager's office.

SIMS:

Something tells me you won't lose. (LAUGHS)

TERRY:

(LAUGHS) Oh, darling Dad!

MFX:

RESTAURANT ORCHESTRA ... UP BRIEFLY, THEN FADES OUT


SFX: FADE IN ... WALLA OF CROWDED MANAGER'S WAITING ROOM ... PHONE BUZZES

MISS WINTERS:

Mr. Anthony Powell's office. Mr. Powell isn't in. Have you an appointment? Sorry. He can't see you.

SFX:

PHONE BUZZES

MISS WINTERS:

Hello? Hello? No. No casting.

KAYE:

Miss Winters? I'm Kaye Hamilton. May I see Mr. Powell, please?

SFX:

PHONE BUZZES

MISS WINTERS:

Just a moment. (INTO PHONE) Hello?

JUDY:

Hiya, Kaye!

KAYE:

Oh, hello, Judy.

MISS WINTERS:

What was it, Miss Hamilton?

KAYE:

I want to see Mr. Powell, please.

MISS WINTERS:

I'm sorry but Mr. Powell isn't seeing anyone today.

KAYE:

But - but I have an appointment. I was supposed to read that part for him. In "Enchanted April."

MISS WINTERS:

I'm sorry.

KAYE:

But if I could only see him for five minutes--

MISS WINTERS:

Not today, Miss Hamilton.

KAYE:

But I've got to see him today. I - I've just - got to-- (GASPS, FAINTS)

MISS WINTERS:

Oh! Miss Hamilton?! Oh! Catch her, someone!

JUDY:

I'll take care of her. Kaye? Kaye, are ya all right?

EVE:

Somebody get some water!

JUDY:

Rub her hands.

EVE:

We'll bring her around.

SFX:

WAITING ROOM DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS IN BG

MAN:

Here, here ya are. Here's the water.

EVE:

Thanks.

TERRY:

(MOVING ON) Eve, Judy -- what happened?

JUDY:

Oh, Terry. It's Kaye. She fainted.

EVE:

Yeah, Powell broke an appointment with her, and when Miss Winters told her she passed out.

MAN:

Ah, she'll be all right. She's coming around now.

JUDY:

Kaye? Are ya all right?

KAYE:

(WEAKLY) I - I feel better now.

TERRY:

Just who does this Anthony Powell think he is, refusing to see people with appointments? Let me through, please!

MISS WINTERS:

Here! You - you can't go in there!

TERRY:

No? Just watch me.

MISS WINTERS:

Well, come back here!

SFX:

OFFICE DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS

POWELL:

I beg your pardon?

TERRY:

So you're Anthony Powell?

POWELL:

Well, and who might you be?

TERRY:

My name is Terry Randall but that's not important.

POWELL:

By what right do you break into my office without any--?

TERRY:

What right have you to barricade yourself behind closed doors and refuse to see people?

POWELL:

It happens to be none of your business.

TERRY:

Do you know that a girl just fainted in your outer office because you broke an appointment with her?

POWELL:

I'm sorry. I didn't know.

TERRY:

And as long as you keep that door closed, you'll never know. You're a producer and it's your business to see actors. Why, the greatest actress in the world might be sitting out there and you'd never give her a chance.

POWELL:

Are you the greatest actress in the world?

TERRY:

Never mind me. I don't need you, but those other girls do. They work and starve and go without decent food and clothes in the hope that someday someone like you will come out of his office and notice them.

POWELL:

Really? Now listen, my militant friend. I judge by your attitude that you hold me personally responsible for any possible tragedy in the lives of the girls who come up here. Is that right?

TERRY:

No, it isn't! But I do think you owe it to all these people to at least see them. Maybe they've got something.

POWELL:

Well, maybe they have. But do you realize that if I tried to see all the young girls who want to be actresses, that I wouldn't have time to do anything else? There are about fifty girls for every job that's open.

TERRY:

But how do you know you'll get the right ones? You don't even have the courtesy to come out of your office and say no to them. That, at least, would be some contact with the theater.

POWELL:

Well, you're one that can't complain. I've seen you, and you're not the type.

TERRY:

You're very smug, Mr. Powell. Very smug.

POWELL:

Well, whether or not you're satisfied that I'm not entirely responsible for the woes of the theatrical world, I'd suggest that you run along and leave me here with my conscience.

TERRY:

I doubt very much that you have a conscience.

SFX:

OFFICE DOOR OPENS

TERRY:

(OFF) Good day, Mr. Powell.

SFX:

OFFICE DOOR SHUTS

MFX:

BRIDGE


SFX: WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES

JUDY:

How is Kaye tonight?

EVE:

Oh, she's all right.

SUSAN:

Well, what did the doctor say was wrong?

EVE:

Malnutrition, he called it. That's Latin for "not eating."

TERRY:

Mrs. Orcutt, what did the doctor say?

MRS. ORCUTT:

She's going to be all right. It was very sweet of you to send in the doctor, Terry.

TERRY:

I asked you not to say anything about it.

MRS. ORCUTT:

Well, of course, dear.

TERRY:

It's not that I'm, er, er, sentimental. It's just that the whole thing seems, um, unnecessary to me.

MRS. ORCUTT:

Certainly, dear. And now that you've paid her rent, there's no reason why she shouldn't stay ... (FADES OUT)

SFX:

WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES FADES OUT


SFX: KNOCK AT ROOM DOOR ... DOOR OPENS

LINDA:

(ARCH AND IRONIC) May I come in, Miss Maitland?

JEAN:

(MATCHES HER) Certainly, Miss Shaw. I guess you'll be safe; the exterminators won't be here till tomorrow.

LINDA:

Hm. How did they miss you on their last visit?

JEAN:

I was out in society that day with an old boyfriend of yours.

LINDA:

Oh, yes. Speaking of funerals, these flowers just arrived for you.

JEAN:

And my little flower girl brought them up to me?

LINDA:

Mm hm.

JEAN:

Well, if I could find my purse, I'd give you a big five cent tip.

SFX:

OPENS FLOWER BOX AND ATTACHED NOTE

LINDA:

Well, I really came along to give you a tip. Oh, and don't bother to read the note. I can tell you what it says: "Eleven roses and the twelfth is you. Signed, Anthony Powell."

JEAN:

You're doing very well up to now. Tell me more.

LINDA:

Oh, the routine's the same for all the girls. Quiet little supper in the Powell penthouse, with champagne and all the fixings. Oh, and then there's Harcourt. Now, Harcourt's a gem.

JEAN:

That's not Harcourt you're wearing, is it?

LINDA:

No, my sweet. Harcourt's the butler. A very discreet butler, if you get what I mean. And conveniently deaf. Now, let me see, Tony usually starts off with the "tired little boy" routine. Oh, but I don't want to spoil it for you. I'll let it all come as a big surprise.

JEAN:

Thanks for calling. And if you ever need a good pallbearer, remember I'm at your service.

LINDA:

Good night, dear. (MOVING OFF) Oh, hello, Randall.

TERRY:

Hello.

LINDA:

(OFF) Have a nice time, Jean.

SFX:

ROOM DOOR SHUTS

TERRY:

I didn't mean to eavesdrop, but I couldn't help overhearing. You're not really running around with this man Powell, are you?

JEAN:

Why not?

TERRY:

Why should you play with fire just to spite Linda?

JEAN:

I can take care of myself!

TERRY:

Personally, I think you need a governess.

JEAN:

Besides, if I don't go out with him, I'll probably lose my job and so will Ann. We'll be right back where we were.

TERRY:

Now, that's a lame excuse. You got along somehow before, didn't you?

JEAN:

I'm sick of getting along "somehow." Besides, it's none of your business.

TERRY:

Sorry. Oh, by the way, that's a beautiful ermine cape you're wearing, remarkably similar to one of mine.

JEAN:

(SUDDENLY SELF-CONSCIOUS) Oh. It - it is yours. I - just wanted to see how I'd feel in one of these things.

TERRY:

You feel any different?

JEAN:

I'll say.

TERRY:

Why don't you wear it?

JEAN:

(ASTONISHED) Do you mean it?

TERRY:

Why not? You may as well go to perdition in ermine. You're sure to come back in rags.

JEAN:

(GASPS, GRATEFUL) You know -- you're funny. In some ways, you're not such a bad egg.

TERRY:

Oh, as eggs go, I probably have my points.

JEAN:

(GENUINE) Gee. Thanks. Good night.

SFX:

JEAN'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY

TERRY:

Night.

SFX:

JEAN'S FOOTSTEPS THROUGH NOISY BOARDINGHOUSE AND OUT THE FRONT DOOR ... TRAFFIC NOISE FROM STREET ... FRONT DOOR SHUTS

BILL:

(OFF) Jean?

JEAN:

Oh, Bill? (THRILLED TO SEE HIM) Hello, Bill!

BILL:

(CHUCKLES) I've been waiting out here for you.

JEAN:

Yeah? Well, when did you get back, Bill?

BILL:

This morning. The show was one of the quicker flops of the year in spite of my swell publicity campaign. Have a cigarette, Jean?

JEAN:

No, thanks. I gave 'em up when I was seven.

BILL:

Bright girl. Ya busy tonight?

JEAN:

(SLIGHT PAUSE, UNEASY) Yeah.

BILL:

Well, I couldn't give you much o' my time tonight anyhow, but how about dinner tomorrow night?

JEAN:

(HESITANT) I don't see how I can very well.

BILL:

Well, why not?

JEAN:

Well, uh, since we got this job, I haven't had much time for anything.

BILL:

Well, you haven't given up eating, have you?

JEAN:

Oh, it isn't that, Bill. It, er-- Maybe we hadn't better see each other for a while.

BILL:

Why?

JEAN:

I just think it's better.

BILL:

(REALIZES) Oh.

JEAN:

(INCREASINGLY DEFENSIVE) Why do you say "oh" like that?

BILL:

How would you say it?

JEAN:

Well, you make it sound like it meant something else!

BILL:

Well, that ermine speaks for itself.

JEAN:

Whatever I do is my own business!

BILL:

Okay, okay. Sure.

JEAN:

I'm sorry, Bill, but I've got to live my own life from now on! (CALMS DOWN, UNCERTAIN) Well, you-- Well, you understand, don't you, Bill?

BILL:

I guess I do. (MOVING OFF) So long, Jean.

JEAN:

(QUIETLY) So long, Bill.

SFX:

TRAFFIC NOISE OUT

MFX:

TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

We pause for station identification. This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.

MFX:

BRIDGE


ANNOUNCER: We've completed the second act of "Stage Door." Ginger Rogers, Rosalind Russell, and Adolphe Menjou bring us Act Three following this brief intermission, which features our special guest of the evening. And now, a word about Lux Toilet Soap, the gentle white soap, with Active Lather, the screen stars use. It's because Lux Toilet Soap has Active Lather that it makes such a wonderful bath soap, too. Carries away perspiration, every trace of dust and dirt, leaves skin smooth and delicately fragrant. Screen stars say, "Men fall for skin that's sweet." A Lux Toilet Soap beauty bath makes you sure. Use this gentle, rich-lathered soap for your daily beauty bath. ... Our producer, Mr. DeMille.

DEMILLE:

For our special guest tonight, we asked the Empire Theatre in New York City to lend us their stage doorman. Of course, his particular stage door is the most glamorous of all. Through it have passed so many great stars, from Sarah Bernhardt to Katharine Cornell. So much a part of the Empire has its doorman become that the theater's his middle name. From New York City, we now present the stage doorman of the Empire Theatre, Mr. George "Empire" Pierce!

PIERCE:

Thank you, Mr. DeMille. I suppose some of you are wondering just what a stage doorman does. Well, I'm a combination policeman, secretary, cook, father confessor and banker. (CLEARS HIS THROAT LOUDLY) It depends, of course, on who's playin' the theater. Take English actors, for instance. They like their tea on matinee afternoons. Brian Aherne is a great tea drinker. When he was with Katharine Cornell at the Empire in "The Barretts of Wimpole Street," I made tea between acts every matinee day. Miss Cornell herself likes to eat dinner in her dressing room between matinee and evening performances. Incidentally, when we have a play opening on the theater in which she does not appear, she sends a wire with best wishes for my opening.

With Burgess Meredith in the theater, you've got to be a banker because Burgess doesn't carry any money in his pockets. He'll come rushing into the theater, toss his hat into a fire bucket, and have his coat and tie off by the time he gets to the dressing room door. Then he'll stop quick and come back to where I'm sitting. "George," he'll say, "I owe you sixty cents." And then he pays me. After the show, he can never find his hat. He grabs the first one he can see whether it fits or not. And it generally doesn't. Now, of course, the man whose hat Burgess takes picks up somebody else's and that goes on and on and on. Nobody has the right hat! (SNORTS) Personally, I always consider it an honor when Burgess grabs my hat off my head as he goes rushing out. (NOISILY SHUFFLES SCRIPT PAGES)

Every day in real life, I see a part of the story you're hearing in "Stage Door" tonight. And I know how tough it is. I remember one girl who kept coming back to the theater whenever a new play was casting. She was never good enough to get a job but that didn't discourage her. One day, she fainted while reading a part. It was the old story; not enough to eat. Well, we took up a collection. Sent her back home. Some place in Ioway. I never saw her again but I'm willing to bet that she'll be back some day. And they won't give up the fight and that makes an old stage doorman's life worth living. Thank you, Mr. DeMille, and good luck to the Lux Radio Theatre.

DEMILLE:

We exit from your stage door in New York, Mr. Pierce, and return to our own "Stage Door" in Hollywood where Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou and Rosalind Russell are ready for Act Three.


MFX: "ARE YOU IN THE MOOD FOR MISCHIEF?" ... FOR A BRIEF SOBER INTRO, THEN ROMANTIC IN BG

DEMILLE:

Later the same evening, in Anthony Powell's penthouse high above Broadway, Jean stands by the window, gazing down at the twinkling lights of the great city. The producer stands close to her, smiling indulgently at her wonderment.

POWELL:

(SMOOTH) It's a beautiful view, isn't it? Hm?

JEAN:

(INEBRIATED) What? Oh. The view. Oh, yes, it's wonderful. It's beautiful.

POWELL:

Tell me, did you enjoy the supper?

JEAN:

I didn't dare to.

POWELL:

Why not?

JEAN:

Make it too hard to go back to lamb stew.

POWELL:

You don't have to go back to that lamb stew -- if you don't want to.

JEAN:

Do you have suppers like this all the time?

POWELL:

Practically all the time. Why?

JEAN:

I just wondered. I wish I'd been born lucky instead of beautiful and hungry.

POWELL:

(CHUCKLES) Will you have a little more champagne?

JEAN:

No, thanks. I'm afraid to walk now. (DIZZY) Whoo-hoo.

POWELL:

Well, uh, perhaps a little coffee?

JEAN:

No, thanks. I just wanna look at the view. Oh, it's a wonderful view. Don't you think? Hm?

POWELL:

Yes. It's a beautiful city. Like a fairyland. It's full of color, illusion, glamour, romance.

SFX:

LIGHT SWITCH CLICKS

JEAN:

Hey! What happened?

POWELL:

What's the matter?

JEAN:

I thought something blew out.

POWELL:

Oh, I turned down the light. It does improve the view, doesn't it?

JEAN:

Oh, it's beautiful.

POWELL:

It's beautiful now, but think of how much more beautiful it will be with your name flashing across the horizon. "Jean Maitland" in letters four feet high.

JEAN:

Eight feet!

POWELL:

(CHUCKLES) All right, eight feet. I'll be the sculptor, and you the clay.

JEAN:

(AGREEABLE) Mmmmhmmmm.

POWELL:

I'll mold you into the greatest dancer Broadway has ever known. I'll be Pygmalion, and you'll be Galatea.

JEAN:

Ohhh, it sounds like a fairy story.

POWELL:

Well, isn't life just a fairy story? After all, aren't grown-up people just little boys and girls at heart? Oh, I know. At the office, I'm the gruff Anthony Powell, theatrical producer. That's a pose. But here, with you, I'm just a tired little boy with a dream.

JEAN:

Who were you going to be?

POWELL:

Hm?

JEAN:

You were going to be somebody, and I was going to be somebody.

POWELL:

Oh, yes, uh-- Pygmalion and Galatea.

JEAN:

Which one am I?

POWELL:

Why, you're Galatea.

JEAN:

(MELODIC) I'm Galatea! (FLAT) Who are they?

POWELL:

Pygmalion was a sculptor who carved the statue of a woman out of marble.

JEAN:

Ohhhh. (CONTINUES TO SIGH AND "OOH" AND "AHH" IN BG)

POWELL:

The statue was so beautiful that he fell in love with her. And his love was so deep, and tender, and true that it warmed the statue into life, and they lived happily ever after.

JEAN:

Ahhhh. Did they get married?

POWELL:

I - I don't think so. I don't believe people got married in those days.

JEAN:

(STRICKEN) I think that's terrible.

POWELL:

What's terrible?

JEAN:

(ON THE VERGE OF TEARS) They didn't get married.

POWELL:

But she was just a statue!

JEAN:

(STARTS TO CRY) Oh, that's what's so terrible about it!

POWELL:

You mustn't cry over a statue! The whole thing's a fairy story!

JEAN:

But after he'd gone to all that trouble and everything!

POWELL:

But he didn't go to any trouble! Now, you're just getting hysterical!

JEAN:

(HYSTERICAL) I'm not hysterical!

POWELL:

Besides, he couldn't marry her if he wanted to.

JEAN:

He should have thought of that in the first place! She was probably minding her own business!

POWELL:

Come on! You're getting yourself all excited over nothing! (CALLS THE BUTLER) Harcourt!

JEAN:

Well, it may be nothing to you, but it was something to her! Why, he can't do that to her!

POWELL:

You bet he can't. Harcourt!

JEAN:

(SOBBING) Well, why don't you do something instead of standing there like that?

POWELL:

I'm going to do something about it. The very first thing in the morning. Harcourt!!

JEAN:

That's a shame.

HARCOURT:

The lady's wrap, Mr. Powell.

POWELL:

Thank you, Harcourt.

JEAN:

Oh, it's awful. It's terrible. (CONTINUES TO SOB IN BG)

POWELL:

(SOOTHING) Now, now, now, here's your wrap. You run along home now; get some sleep and don't worry about anything. I'll see my lawyer; we'll get the whole thing straightened out.

JEAN:

(SUDDENLY STOPS SOBBING) What thing?

POWELL:

(EXASPERATED) Now, look, my darling -- whatever there is to be straightened out! Harcourt, open the door.

HARCOURT:

Yes, sir.

JEAN:

(APPRECIATIVE SIGHS, OVERLAPS WITH DIALOGUE)

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

POWELL:

(REASSURING) There's good old Harcourt; he'll see you to the car. That's a good girl.

JEAN:

(DREAMILY) Ah, you're wonderful. Did anybody ever tell you you're wonderful?

POWELL:

(PLAYING ALONG, PLEASANTLY) You're wonderful, too. And Harcourt's wonderful. And I'm wonderful. And the whole thing's wonderful.

JEAN:

(OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) Ah, you're wonderful. You're wonderful, wonderful, wonderful.

POWELL:

Good night, good night!

SFX:

DOOR SHUTS

POWELL:

(HUGE SIGH OF RELIEF) Whew!

MFX:

UP FOR A MOMENT, THEN FADES OUT


SFX: FADE IN ... PHONE BUZZES

MISS WINTERS:

Mr. Anthony Powell's office. I'm sorry, Mr. Powell's in conference, Mr. Burke, and he cannot be disturbed.

SFX:

PHONE BUZZES ... THEN FADES OUT


POWELL: (FADES IN) Now, let me get this straight, Mr. Carmichael. You have a client; a client who's interested in putting a little money into my show "Enchanted April." Right?

CARMICHAEL:

Exactly. But he wants to remain -- shall I say, er -- incognito.

POWELL:

Of course, of course. Now, er, just how much does your client wish to put up?

CARMICHAEL:

As much as you need, Mr. Powell. With one stipulation.

POWELL:

Mm. Well?

CARMICHAEL:

He wishes to be allowed the choice of the feminine lead.

POWELL:

(KNOWINGLY) Oh, I see.

CARMICHAEL:

I don't think you do. His purpose is not merely to make his daughter a present of the leading role, Mr. Powell. He wants to find out, and quickly, if she has any real talent.

POWELL:

I see.

CARMICHAEL:

Are you willing, under those terms?

POWELL:

(CHUCKLES) Well, fresh money is always welcome. By the way, who's the girl?

CARMICHAEL:

The name she uses now is Terry Randall.

POWELL:

(MUSES) Randall, Randall? Oh, yes. Terry Randall.

MFX:

BRIDGE, THEN ROMANTIC ("ARE YOU IN THE MOOD FOR MISCHIEF?"), OUT AT [X]

POWELL:

(SMOOTH) I expect this to be the greatest play I've ever produced, Miss Randall. Every actress on Broadway has begged to play the part of Jeanette. It's one of the greatest parts ever written. Shall I turn down the lights a little, Miss Randall? It improves the view. Makes it more restful. [X]

TERRY:

On the contrary. It makes me feel slightly uncomfortable. Are you sure you brought me up here to discuss this play?

POWELL:

Why do you ask?

TERRY:

I'm a suspicious person.

POWELL:

You want to be a star, don't you?

TERRY:

Yes. Under the proper circumstances.

POWELL:

How would you like to see your name blazing across the horizon in letters four feet high?

TERRY:

(CONSIDERS) Four feet? Yes, it's got to be a good-sized sign. I'm used to that. So's Jean Maitland.

POWELL:

(CURT) What's she got to do with it?

TERRY:

Are you in love with her?

POWELL:

No.

TERRY:

I thought so.

POWELL:

What's Jean Maitland got to do with this discussion? Do you want to play this part or don't you?

TERRY:

I'm really tremendously flattered, but how do you know I can act? You've never seen me on the stage.

POWELL:

How do you know that?

TERRY:

Because I've never been on the stage.

POWELL:

Oh. Well, I saw you perform in my office.

TERRY:

(POINTEDLY) I wasn't performing that day.

POWELL:

Well, whether you were or not, I know an actress when I see one. You showed fire and emotion, and that's what I need in this part.

TERRY:

I'm not an emotional person.

POWELL:

You will be when I'm get through. I'll mold you into one.

TERRY:

I don't want to be molded. I believe in acting with my brain.

POWELL:

Well, I'll mold you one of those also. Would you like some champagne?

TERRY:

No, thank you.

POWELL:

Do you mind if I have some, do you?

TERRY:

Go right ahead.

SFX:

PENTHOUSE DOORBELL BUZZES

HARCOURT:

I beg your pardon, sir. Are you expecting someone?

POWELL:

No. Get some champagne. I'll answer it. (TO TERRY) Do you mind if I answer the door?

TERRY:

Not at all.

POWELL:

(MOVING OFF) Thanks.

SFX:

PENTHOUSE DOORBELL BUZZES ... DOOR OPENS

JEAN:

Well, it's about time!

POWELL:

Jean! How did you get up here?

JEAN:

Have you got a woman in this apartment?

POWELL:

Who wants to know?

JEAN:

I do.

POWELL:

Now, listen, I'm in a bad humor.

JEAN:

Where is she?

TERRY:

(OFF, AS IF SLIGHTLY DRUNK) Hello, Jean! Come on in!

JEAN:

Oh! So it's you!

TERRY:

Hellooo.

JEAN:

Say, what is this?

POWELL:

That's what I'm asking.

TERRY:

Mr. Powell's just been telling me the plot of a play.

JEAN:

So that's how you happen to be sitting on the floor?

POWELL:

Come on, get up, Miss Randall. That isn't where I left you. What is this? A frame-up?

TERRY:

Tony, darling, control yourself.

POWELL:

Now, don't "Tony, darling" me! Come on. Get up out of there. Jean, you go home. Go on.

JEAN:

I'll go when you hear what I've to say.

POWELL:

Say it and get it over with. She came up here to sign a contract to do a play.

JEAN:

What's she going to sign it with, champagne?

POWELL:

Harcourt! Call the manager!

JEAN:

Oh, you needn't call any manager. I thought I was in love with you. But I see my mistake now. I only went out with you in the first place to spite Linda. And as for you, Miss Terry Randall, you'd better hide your face, you double-dealing, double-dyed--

TERRY:

(PRETEND INNOCENCE) Darling, I didn't know what I was doing.

JEAN:

My own roommate! And you preach ideals! You and your grandfather!

POWELL:

Now, look, I've had enough of this nonsense.

JEAN:

She preaches ideals so she can chisel when my back is turned. Well, you can take your old red fox cape. I'll never borrow another thing from you as long as I live! (DISSOLVING INTO TEARS) Don't you try to borrow anything from me, either. (MOVING OFF) I hope you two will be very happy together, you two-faced snakes!

SFX:

PENTHOUSE DOOR SHUTS

TERRY:

(LAUGHS AND LAUGHS)

POWELL:

(RELIEVED) Good Lord. (TO TERRY) Well, what's so funny?

TERRY:

Everything.

POWELL:

Well, it's not funny at all. What do you suppose she thinks?

TERRY:

Exactly what I want her to think.

POWELL:

What? But why?

TERRY:

Well, for several reasons. In the first place, I like her.

POWELL:

Oh, I see. You're something of a Girl Scout, aren't you?

TERRY:

First class. And now suppose we get back to the play?

MFX:

MILDLY TRIUMPHANT BRIDGE


SFX: THEATER CREW MURMURS ... POWELL CLAPS HANDS ... CREW QUIETS

POWELL:

All right, all right! Take your places on stage, please! We're going to play the scene over again, from the father's line! Go ahead, Walters.

FATHER:

Right. (IN CHARACTER) Mother! Here's Jeanette now -- coming up the garden path.

MOTHER:

Oh, poor child--

POWELL:

(OFF) Wait a minute. Uh, mother, uh, cross center there.

MOTHER:

Poor child. She's probably brokenhearted. You'd better let me talk to her first. (NO RESPONSE, REPEATS A LITTLE LOUDER) You'd better let me talk to her first.

POWELL:

(YELLS, ANNOYED) Well?! Come on, Miss Randall! That's your cue!

TERRY:

Oh, I'm sorry, Mr. Powell. I didn't realize we were rehearsing it again.

POWELL:

In the theater, Miss Randall, you come in on cue. Now, try it again.

TERRY:

But my opening speech still doesn't seem right to me.

POWELL:

If you'd read it correctly, that would help. Remember, your husband has just left you and you're brokenhearted. (WITH EMPHASIS) Brokenhearted. Can you understand that? Start over again, Walters.

FATHER:

Yes, sir. (IN CHARACTER) Mother! Here's Jeanette now -- coming up the garden path.

MOTHER:

Oh, the poor child. She's probably brokenhearted. You'd better let me talk to her first.

TERRY:

(UNEMOTIONAL, TOO QUICKLY) The calla lilies are in bloom again. Such a strange flower, suitable to any occasion. I carried them on my wedding day, and now I place them here in memory of something that has died.

POWELL:

That's terrible!

TERRY:

Well, if you think I'm so terrible, Mr. Powell, why did you hire me for the part?

POWELL:

That's what I'd like to know! Probably temporary insanity! Try it again!

MFX:

WRY ACCENT, THEN OUT


SFX: WALLA OF WOMEN'S VOICES

MARY LOU:

Jean? Do you think this dress is fancy enough for an opening night?

JEAN:

For Randall's opening, you ought to wear black.

MARY LOU:

Aw, hush. She was nice enough to give us free tickets.

JEAN:

Yeah, she wanted to be sure there was somebody in the audience.

JUDY:

You sound as if you want her to be a flop.

JEAN:

Not exactly, but as long as there's going to be a flop, I wanna be there and see it. (FADES OUT)


TERRY: (FADES IN, RUNNING HER LINES, BADLY) The calla lilies are in bloom again. Such a strange flower, suitable for every occasion. The calla lilies are in bloom again--

SFX:

ROOM DOOR OPENS

MRS. LUTHER:

Miss Randall? Rehearsing again? I thought I told you to rest.

TERRY:

(MILD PANIC) I can't remember a line, Luther. Not a line.

SFX:

ROOM DOOR SHUTS

MRS. LUTHER:

Of course you can't. No one can an hour before curtain time on an opening night. When you step out on the stage, they'll all come back to you.

TERRY:

But what if they don't?

MRS. LUTHER:

They will. They always do.

SFX:

ROOM DOOR OPENS

TERRY:

Kaye! The doctor told you to stay in bed.

KAYE:

How do you expect me to stay in bed with all this excitement going on?

TERRY:

But you mustn't disobey orders, dear. I was going to come up and see you before I left.

MRS. LUTHER:

Keep her cheerful, Kaye. She's got first-night nerves. You've had them. You know. I'll run along now and get my things. (MOVING OFF) We're due at the theater now.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS

TERRY:

Kaye, it's that opening speech. If I could only get through that, I think maybe I'd be all right. Kaye, watch me, will you? (IN CHARACTER, STILL TERRIBLE) The calla lilies are in bloom again. Such a strange flower, suitable for any occasion.

KAYE:

May I make a suggestion?

TERRY:

I wish you would.

KAYE:

(DEEPLY FELT) The way you hold the flowers. I always felt that Jeanette would hold them - as she would a child. You see, they never had a child.

TERRY:

Oh. Oh, I see. Do you suppose that was what the author intended?

KAYE:

I'm sure of it. And when she says, "In memory of something that has died ..."

TERRY:

(REALIZES) Kaye? Do you know this play?

KAYE:

(INTENSE) It's not a play. It really happened. It happened to someone I know. (BREAKS DOWN AND CRIES) It happened to me.

TERRY:

Oh, Kaye darling, don't do that.

KAYE:

This isn't just your night. It's my night, too. Oh, Terry, you've got to be a success tonight. You've got to give a great performance. (WEAKLY) No matter what happens.

TERRY:

(UNSURE) Is something the matter?

KAYE:

No. No, I'm just excited, that's all.

SFX:

ROOM DOOR OPENS

MRS. LUTHER:

Terry, aren't you ready yet?

TERRY:

One minute; just a minute. (CONCERNED) Kaye? Kaye, you're ill.

KAYE:

No, I'm not. It - it's just excitement. Terry, I want you to have this ring. A girl gave it to me last year and - it brought me luck on my opening night. Maybe it will bring luck to you.

TERRY:

Oh, darling, you're sweet. I wish you could be there later, in the theater.

KAYE:

I will be there, Terry. (POINTEDLY) In spirit.

TERRY:

(DOESN'T LIKE THE SOUND OF THAT) Kaye?

SFX:

ROOM DOOR QUICKLY SHUTS

MRS. LUTHER:

Come now, Terry.

TERRY:

Luther? Luther, there's something wrong with Kaye.

MRS. LUTHER:

Nonsense, my dear.

TERRY:

There is! Didn't you see her? Her face? Her eyes? She frightens me!

MRS. LUTHER:

Now, Terry, please. You're all nerves; you've got to calm yourself.

MARY LOU:

(FROM OFF, SCREAMS)

TERRY:

Luther!

MRS. LUTHER:

What? What was it?

MARY LOU:

(FROM OFF, HYSTERICAL) I tried to stop her! I tried to stop her!

TERRY:

Something's happened. Kaye?! Kaye?!

SFX:

ROOM DOOR OPENS ... FROM OFF, BOARDINGHOUSE WOMEN MURMUR IN HORROR

TERRY:

Jean?

JEAN:

(FLAT) There's no use calling her now.

TERRY:

Jean, what is it?

JEAN:

She can't hear ya now. She's lying downstairs. All huddled up on the pavement.

TERRY:

(HORRIFIED) No!

JEAN:

She jumped out of the window. (DISSOLVES INTO TEARS) Little Kaye. She's dead.

TERRY:

Oh, my God. Oh, my God.

MRS. LUTHER:

Jean, why did you tell her? Terry isn't responsible.

JEAN:

She is responsible. It was Kaye's part. It was Kaye's life. Now it's too late.

MRS. LUTHER:

Please, please.

JEAN:

Kaye is dead. Kaye, who never harmed anyone! And all because she hasn't a heart, because she's made of ice!

TERRY:

(SOBS)

MRS. LUTHER:

Terry, don't listen to her. Jean, get out of this room, do you hear?

JEAN:

I'm leaving. I'm going to the theater. And I'm going to sit out front because Kaye asked me to be there.

TERRY:

No, no.

JEAN:

And every line she reads, I'm going to say, "That should be Kaye's line." And every move she makes, I'm going to say, "That should be Kaye."

TERRY:

(SOBS)

JEAN:

Kaye, who's lying there in the street all broken and alone. (SAVAGE) Now, I dare you to go on tonight. I dare you.

SFX:

ROOM DOOR SHUTS

TERRY:

(SOBS)

MRS. LUTHER:

Terry? Terry, dear?

SFX:

POLICE SIRENS IN DISTANCE

TERRY:

Kaye. Little Kaye. Oh, my God. (BREAKS DOWN AND CRIES)

MFX:

BRIDGE


SFX: WALLA OF MURMURING THEATER AUDIENCE ... FADES OUT AT [X]

USHER:

Curtain. Curtain. Curtain going up. Curtain going up. Curtain. Curtain. Curtain going up. (FADES OUT) [X]


ANN: (IMPLORING) Jean. Jean. She couldn't help it. Terry couldn't help it. (OVERLAPS WITH PLAY'S DIALOGUE UNTIL [X])

FATHER:

(FADES IN) ... too hard for her. I'm afraid.

MOTHER:

Oh, why did it have to happen like this? She was so happy. I don't understand it. [X]

FATHER:

Oh, Mother! Here's Jeanette now, coming up the garden path.

MOTHER:

Oh, the poor child. She's probably brokenhearted. You'd better let me talk to her first. Jeanette? Jeanette, dear ...

MFX:

HEARTFELT ... STRINGS ... IN BG

TERRY:

(WITH GREAT EMOTION) The calla lilies are in bloom again. Such a strange flower. Suitable to any occasion. I carried them on my - my wedding day. And now I place them here in memory of something that has died.

MOTHER:

You poor child.

TERRY:

Have you gathered here to mourn, or bring me comfort? I've learned something about love that I never knew before. You speak of love - when it's too late. Why are we always so helpful to each other when it's too late? He's coming to say goodbye today. And one must always listen closely when people say goodbye. Because sometimes - sometimes they're really saying - farewell.

MOTHER:

Oh, my darling, you can't stay here. We'll take you away somewhere.

TERRY:

No, this is my home. This is where I belong.

ANN:

(LOWERED VOICE, OVERLAPS WITH PLAY'S DIALOGUE) Jean? Jean? She's good. Terry's good. Jean, don't stare like that. Jean!

MFX:

TO A CLIMAX ... THEN OUT

SFX:

THEATER AUDIENCE CHEERS AND APPLAUDS

MAN 2:

Bravo!

MAN 3:

Magnificent!

MAN 4:

Terry Randall gave the best performance I've seen in years!

WOMAN:

That Randall girl is marvelous!

SFX:

THEATER AUDIENCE QUIETS

TERRY:

(CURTAIN SPEECH, EMOTIONAL) I suppose - I should thank you on behalf of the company. And I know that I'm grateful for your applause. But I must tell you that I don't deserve it. I'm not responsible for what happened on this stage tonight. The person you should all be applauding - died a few hours ago. A young and brilliant actress who could no longer find a place in the theater. It was for her, more than for anyone else, that I was able to go on. I hope that wherever she is, she knows - (SOBS) - and understands - and forgives.

SFX:

SLIGHTLY CONFUSED THEATER AUDIENCE APPLAUDS POLITELY ... FADES OUT


MRS. LUTHER: My dear, you'll never know how good you were tonight. You were simply wonderful.

TERRY:

That wasn't me out there tonight, Luther. It was someone else.

MRS. LUTHER:

It's only after we've suffered that we can make the audience feel for us.

TERRY:

Does someone have to die to create an actress? Is that what the theater demands?

SFX:

DRESSING ROOM DOOR OPENS ... CROWD MURMURS ... DOOR SHUTS ... CROWD OUT

TERRY:

(SYMPATHETIC) Oh, Jean. Oh, Jean.

JEAN:

(NEAR TEARS) Terry. Please forgive me. You were wonderful, Terry.

TERRY:

(MATCHING HER) No, not I. It was Kaye, Jean. Wherever she is, I know she understands. Will you take me to her? Please, Jean.

JEAN:

Yeah. Yeah. Here, here's your coat. (FADES OUT)


SFX: FADE IN ... WALLA OF CLAMORING REPORTERS ... IN BG

REPORTER:

Is it true Terry Randall's the Wheat King's daughter, Mr. Powell? Give us a break, will ya?

POWELL:

Please, gentlemen, please, please. I'll give you the whole story.

REPORTERS:

Well! Okay. All right.

POWELL:

Yes, it's true. Miss Randall is the daughter of Henry Sims, the Wheat King.

REPORTER:

How'd you discover her, Mr. Powell?

POWELL:

How? Well, that's another story. See me tomorrow.

REPORTER:

Okay. We'll be there.

SFX:

REPORTERS MOVE OFF

ELLSWORTH:

Evening, Anthony.

POWELL:

Oh, hello, Ellsworth. Do we get a good review from you tomorrow?

ELLSWORTH:

Well, Terry Randall will. She has very a strange quality. Reminds me very much of that girl you brought out last year.

POWELL:

Oh, yes?

ELLSWORTH:

What was her name?

POWELL:

Oh, um, Hamilton.

ELLSWORTH:

Yes, yes. Kaye Hamilton. What ever happened to her?

POWELL:

She's still around.

ELLSWORTH:

Strange quality. Beautiful.

POWELL:

Yes, I'll have to look her up. I think I've got just the part for her.

ELLSWORTH:

Well, good night.

POWELL:

Good night.

MFX:

BLUE BRIDGE ... CHANGES TO BLUE BOARDINGHOUSE PIANO PLAYING "MANHATTAN SERENADE" ... CONTINUES IN BG

ANN:

(INTO PHONE) Hello? ... Yes, this is the Footlights Club. ... Oh! Well, I'll see, Bill. Hey, we're having a little excitement around here this afternoon. Judy North is leaving. (GIGGLES) Getting married. Wait a minute.

JUDY:

Well, goodbye, everybody. I got to catch a seven o'clock train. Thanks for everything. If any of you hams ever come to Seattle, the house of Milbanks is always open to you.

TERRY:

Well, if we do come up to see you, I hope you'll promise to give us woodchuck pie.

JUDY:

Better than lamb stew!

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

JUDY:

Well ... Well, goodbye, everybody. I-- Gee, now - now that I'm actually going, I feel like having a good cry.

JEAN:

Oh ho, you should weep! It's the first job you've had in a year.

WOMEN:

(LAUGH)

JUDY:

Goodbye!

WOMEN:

Goodbye!

MFX:

CHANGES TO WARM AND COZY ... ORCHESTRA ... "MANHATTAN SERENADE" IN BG

JEAN:

Ah, well. That's that. Poor kid. Why she hated to leave a dump like this is a mystery.

TERRY:

Oh, I know how she feels. To me, it would be like leaving the house where I was born.

JEAN:

Well, at least she'll probably have a couple of kids to keep her company in her old age. And what'll we have? Some broken-down memories or an old, mangy scrapbook that nobody'll look at.

TERRY:

Well, we probably are a different race of people.

JEAN:

Maybe. Just now, I feel like sitting in the moonlight having somebody hold my hand.

ANN:

Hey, Jean! Bill's on the phone.

JEAN:

(EAGERLY) Bill?! Oh! Give it to me! (INTO PHONE) Hello, hello, hello? Bill?!

TERRY:

Don't be sentimental. Remember, you're a ham at heart!

JEAN:

(AMUSED, WHISPERS) Oh, shut up, Terry! Shut up! (INTO PHONE) No. No, Bill. That was a friend of mine. Hey, Bill, how would you like to take an old broken-down hag to dinner and maybe for a ride out toward Bronx Park or someplace? ... Eight o'clock at the greasy spoon? All right, Pigeon Pie.

MFX:

TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE


DEMILLE: Now, we bring you backstage for an interview with our stars, Ginger Rogers, Rosalind Russell and Adolphe Menjou.

MENJOU:

Before the play began, Mr. DeMille, you spoke of a theatrical boardinghouse in New York and during the play we talked about a group called the Footlights Club. And right here in Hollywood we've a counterpart of both.

DEMILLE:

Yes, what those places are to the stage, the Hollywood Studio Club is to the movies.

ROGERS:

It's one of the finest things that ever hit this town. During the past twenty-three years, it has provided a home and companionship for about three thousand girls with great ambitions and slender finances.

RUSSELL:

But, unfortunately, living at the Studio Club is no more a guarantee of success than living at the Footlights Club solved the problem of "Stage Door." Of the three thousand girls Ginger mentioned, I'm told that only a hundred reached any degree of fame. Knowing what odds are against her, I think any girl who still wants to act deserves all the help and encouragement we can give her.

ROGERS:

Well, Ros, I'm never more embarrassed than when I'm asked for advice because advice is what I can use plenty of myself. But, when I am asked, I always put a lot of emphasis on good appearance.

DEMILLE:

Pointing out, perhaps, such models as that sartorial success story -- that paragon of the peaked lapel -- Adolphe Menjou?

ROGERS:

(CHUCKLES)

MENJOU:

Now, uh, I've been kidded about my wardrobe so much that I'm ready to swap everything for one fairly substantial rain barrel. Where were you, Ginger?

ROGERS:

About to remark that the little article putting on this great big show can be very helpful in the matter of good appearance. I mean Lux Soap. A smooth, fresh complexion is a tremendous asset to every girl.

RUSSELL:

Since I happen to use it, too, Ginger, I'm delighted to add an enthusiastic ditto.

MENJOU:

And don't forget the job its program is doing in keeping everyone entertained on Monday nights. Good night, sir.

ROGERS:

Good night.

RUSSELL:

Good night, Mr. DeMille. Good night.

DEMILLE:

Good night. Our stage door is open to you anytime. Good night.

SFX:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

Listen to Mr. DeMille's announcement in just a moment of the play and stars awaiting you here next week. Eve Arden's next film is Warner Brothers' "Women in the Wind." Louis Silvers appeared through courtesy of Twentieth Century-Fox studio where he directed music for "Wife, Husband and Friend." And be sure to hear the new Lux radio show, "The Life and Love of Dr. Susan," the adventures of a young woman doctor struggling against odds to support her two children. You can hear it on most of these stations in the United States every day, Monday through Friday, in the Eastern time zone at 2:15, in the Central time zone at 1:15, in the Mountain time zone at 3:15, and on the Pacific coast at 2:15. This daylight show comes to you in addition to the Lux Radio Theatre.

Heard in our cast tonight were Miss Florence Lake as Ann, Lurene Tuttle as Kaye Hamilton, Leona Roberts as Mrs. Orcutt, Gloria Gordon as Mrs. Ann Luther, Gerald Cornell as Carmichael, Tyler McVey as Bill, Frank Nelson as Ellsworth, Ynez Seabury as Eve, Jeanette McLeay as Mary Lou, Margaret Brayton as Judy, Colleen Ward as Susan, Sarah Selby as Operator, Martha Wentworth as Mother, Lou Merrill as Korovsky, Edward Marr as Usher, James Eagles as Harcourt, David Kerman as Reporter and Crauford Kent as Henry Sims. ... Mr. DeMille?

DEMILLE:

Man's conquest of the air has provided the screen with some of its finest and most exciting melodrama. Celebrated among such pictures is the romantic play awaiting you here next Monday night, "Ceiling Zero," a vigorous, roaring commentary on transport aviation and the men who pioneered with wings. You'll hear "Ceiling Zero" with the same two stars who flew with it to new heights of popularity, James Cagney and Stuart Erwin.

MFX:

LUX THEME ... CONTINUES IN BG

DEMILLE:

Our sponsors, the makers of Lux Toilet soap, join me in inviting you to be with us again next Monday night when the Lux Radio Theatre presents James Cagney and Stuart Erwin in "Ceiling Zero," with Boots Mallory and Jeanne Cagney. This is Cecil B. DeMille saying good night to you from Hollywood.

ANNOUNCER:

Musical selections heard tonight included: "Manhattan Serenade" by Louis Alter; "Thanks for Everything" from "Thanks for Everything"; and "Are You in the Mood for Mischief?" from "Tailspin."

SFX:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

Your announcer has been Melville Ruick. This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.

SFX:

APPLAUSE CONTINUES TO END

MFX:

LUX THEME CONTINUES TO END