Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Romance
Show: A Girl's Best Friend
Date: Sep 09 1955

CAST:
ANNOUNCER
MYRA, young-looking mom, late thirties
NORA MITCHELL, Myra's friend, same age
SUSIE, Myra's teen daughter
MARY FLEMING, Susie's teen friend
JOHNNY MITCHELL, Nora's hunky teen son

MUSIC:

DRUM ROLL

ANNOUNCER:

Now, from Hollywood -- ROMANCE!

MUSIC:

THEME ... FADES OUT BEHIND--

ANNOUNCER:

ROMANCE -- transcribed stories of love and adventure, of excitement and derring-do, of conflict and human emotion. Today, starring Barbara Whiting as Susie and Doris Singleton as Myra, we present Kathleen Hite's emotional story "A Girl's Best Friend."

MUSIC:

FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN OUT

MYRA:

Like it?

NORA:

Oh, it's cute. It's just as cute as it can be.

MYRA:

How's the length?

NORA:

Well, fine, but, um, shouldn't Susie try it on to be sure?

MYRA:

Susie? (CHUCKLES) Nora dear, it's my dress.

NORA:

(EMBARRASSED) Ohhhh. Oh, goodness. (CHUCKLES)

MYRA:

Well, what's wrong?

NORA:

Oh, nothing, nothing. Nothing, really. I was just so sure it was for Susie, that's all. Oh, but it really looks quite nice on you, Myra. Really, it does.

MYRA:

Well, I thought so in the store. But the way you're reacting, I don't know.

NORA:

Well, I - I love it on you. It's just that somehow I supposed that you bought it for Susie. You know, you're always buying new things for her. She always looks so sweet and nice.

MYRA:

Oh, I bought her a dress, too. To tell you the truth, I just couldn't decide between them. So Miss Jensen suggested I buy them both. She knows our tastes so well.

NORA:

Miss Jensen? In the teen shop?

MYRA:

Uh huh. Well, I know it sounds ridiculous, but I just can't seem to get a proper fit anywhere else.

NORA:

Well, that's what you get for hanging on to that trim little figure of yours.

MYRA:

(MODEST CHUCKLE)

NORA:

(LIGHTLY) Honestly, Myra, if you weren't one of my oldest friends, I might be forced to loathe you a little.

MYRA:

Oh, now don't you talk like that. Everyone says you're one of the best-dressed women in town. Now, how 'bout some more coffee?

NORA:

No, only - only half a cup. I gotta stop in the market on the way home.

SOUND:

COFFEE POURED

MYRA:

Oh, Nora, it was nice of you to drop by. Funny, isn't it? I see so much more of Johnny than I do of you and Mitch.

NORA:

Well, as long as your daughter stays as attractive as she is, you'll, uh, see a lot of Johnny.

MYRA:

Oh, he's a delightful boy, Nora. Susie and I are so fond of him.

NORA:

Oh, Johnny's all right, but-- Well, I'd think you'd get sick to death of him. He practically lives over here.

MYRA:

Susie's whole gang practically lives over here. And I love it!

NORA:

Well, you must. It certainly agrees with you.

MYRA:

(CHUCKLES)

NORA:

Which brings me to the point of my visit.

MYRA:

Point?

NORA:

Well, Mitch and I want you to come to dinner Saturday night. Now, we're just having a few people--

MYRA:

Why, that's very nice, Nora, but--

NORA:

Well, now wait a minute. I know you don't like to be the "extra woman" at parties, and I don't blame you, but Fred Stanley's in town and Mitch said Fred was quite taken with you in that one brief meeting you had last spring.

MYRA:

Well, I do appreciate it. It - it's just that I--

NORA:

And, Myra, in that stunning new dress-- Well, none of the men will be safe.

MYRA:

(LAUGHS) Aren't you nice? Um, but, you see, Saturday-- Well, as a matter of fact, it's the reason I bought the dress in the first place. We're having the crowd in here, Susie and I; a little supper and a dance and--

NORA:

Another party, Myra? Well, you just had one last week.

MYRA:

(CHUCKLES) I know, but--

NORA:

It's none of my business, I know, but-- You - you do so much for Susie and her friends.

MYRA:

Nora, they're young. It's a time for parties and all the fun things of living. They deserve them. Time - time passes so quickly.

NORA:

Well, I'm thinking about you, Myra. You know, you deserve a life, too. Life of your own, with friends your own age.

MYRA:

Mm, I'm not complaining. Susie and I are more than mother and daughter. We're friends, too. (EXHALES) We've had to be, all these years alone.

NORA:

Well, you're an amazing woman.

MYRA:

(MODEST CHUCKLE)

SOUND:

COFFEE CUP SET DOWN ... THEY RISE AND WALK TO FRONT DOOR BEHIND--

NORA:

Well, I've still got the marketing to do -- and if there's a party Saturday night, I'll have to send Johnny's blue suit to the cleaners.

MYRA:

Oh, um, don't mention the party to Johnny just yet, Nora.

NORA:

Oh?

MYRA:

Well, it's just that it's-- Well, sort of a surprise. I haven't even told Susie.

NORA:

(TAKEN ABACK) All right, Myra. I won't tell him.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS THROUGH HOUSE

MYRA:

(CALLS) Susie? Susie, you home?

SUSIE:

(OFF) In here, Myra.

SOUND:

MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS TO SUSIE DURING FOLLOWING--

SUSIE:

Oh, golly, it's dreamy! Just dreamy!

MYRA:

What's just dreamy? Oh! You like it, huh?

SUSIE:

Mmm. How do I look?

MYRA:

(AWKWARD) Why-- Well, fine, sweetie. Just - just fine. Only--

SUSIE:

Well, I know. It's just a trifle too long. Half an inch maybe. But I can have it fixed.

MYRA:

(SIGHS) Well, don't worry. By the time you're ready to wear it, who knows? You may have grown half an inch.

SUSIE:

(REALIZES) Oh. (COVERS DISAPPOINTMENT) Oh, well, I'll bet you'll look just great in it.

MYRA:

(DRY) Just dreamy.

SOUND:

MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS TO CLOSET DOOR WHICH OPENS ... MYRA TAKES OUT DRESS AND WALKS TO SUSIE

MYRA:

And I'll bet you look great in this.

SUSIE:

(UNCONVINCING) Why-- Why, it's nice, Myra. It's wonderful.

MYRA:

Mmm, I think it looks just like you.

SUSIE:

(UNENTHUSIASTIC) Gee, another new dress. And after I thought we'd bought all my clothes for school and everything. Thanks, Myra.

MYRA:

Oh, honey, I love doing it for you, you know that.

SUSIE:

Help me out of yours, will you?

MYRA:

(CHUCKLES) Sure. Here.

SOUND:

DRESS PULLED OFF

MYRA:

There you go.

SUSIE:

Thanks.

MYRA:

(BEAT) Well?

SUSIE:

Hm?

MYRA:

Well, aren't you going to try yours on?

SUSIE:

Oh. Well, not just now. I promised Mary Fleming I'd call her right after dinner.

MYRA:

(BEAT, SERIOUS) What is it, Susie?

SUSIE:

Nothing. I - I told her I'd call. I really did.

MYRA:

I mean -- about the dresses. (LIGHTLY) You don't mind my buying clothes in the teen shop?

SUSIE:

Mind? Why, no.

MYRA:

I mean, you don't think the styles are - too young for me?

SUSIE:

(CAREFULLY) You're - very young, Myra. Everyone remarks about it -- Mary, all the kids. They're always telling me how lucky I am -- that you've stayed so young, so interested in everything.

MYRA:

(LAUGHS) Aren't they cute?

SUSIE:

They envy me -- all of them -- for having a mother who's more like a friend. A real good friend.

MYRA:

(SERIOUS) Best friend, Susie. (LIGHTER) Now, you run along, call Mary. And tell her "Hi" for me.

SUSIE:

Sure.

MYRA:

Oh, uh, when does she leave for school?

SUSIE:

Um, Sunday, I think.

MYRA:

Then tell her we're having a farewell party for her Saturday night.

SUSIE:

We are? But - we just had a party.

MYRA:

So? We both got new dresses, and Mary's going away. Why not have another one?

SUSIE:

(UNCOMFORTABLE) Well-- I don't know. I'm sure Mary will be pleased.

MYRA:

Oh, now don't look so worried. I've already made out the guest list -- oh, it's on the phone table -- and I've almost worked out the menu! (CHUCKLES) It's practically all done.

SUSIE:

I'm not worried, Myra. You - always take care of everything.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... CHANGES TO MELLOW 1950s PARTY MUSIC (NOT ROCK 'N' ROLL)

SOUND:

PARTY GUESTS MURMUR QUIETLY IN BG AS MYRA MOVES SOME CHINA AROUND

MARY:

Can I give you a hand, Myra?

MYRA:

Oh, no, Mary. My goodness, no. I was just putting the last of our china aside. Having fun?

MARY:

Oh, you don't know how much. Gee, I don't know how to thank you. Nobody's ever done anything so nice for me before.

MYRA:

We're going to miss you. We wanted to tell you so.

MARY:

Oh, I'll miss you -- you and Susie -- more than anyone else. Myra, you're just unbelievable. I wish my mother were like you.

MYRA:

(MODEST CHUCKLE) Mary dear, I'm flattered, of course, but-- Well, you really shouldn't say things like that.

MARY:

I think them. And I can tell you, like I can tell Susie. (A CONFESSION) Well, don't feel sorry for me or anything corny like that. We get along all right, mother and I, and -- I'm not unhappy about it any more.

MYRA:

Well, I'd no idea you'd ever been unhappy. Especially at home.

MARY:

Well, I don't get much of a chance to be unhappy there. I'm not there very much. I get packed off to school somewhere in the winter and sent off to camps in the summer. I think mother'd like to forget she has a teenaged daughter.

MYRA:

Oh, now, I won't let you think that. It's a terrible thing to feel unwanted. And you mustn't.

MARY:

Why, I honestly think her problem's worse than mine.

MYRA:

Your mother's?

MARY:

Why, don't you know, Myra? Well, no, you probably don't. But the years are ticking by and she doesn't like it. And when I'm around, she's got to face it. (DRY) She's old enough to be my mother.

MYRA:

(LAUGHS, CHANGES THE SUBJECT) Oh, my goodness, everybody's dancing and we're just standing here like a couple of sticks. Go on, Mary. Find Bill, have fun.

MARY:

All right, I will. I just wanted to thank you.

MYRA:

Oh, you're more than welcome, dear.

SOUND:

MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS THROUGH KITCHEN DOOR ... GUESTS AND MUSIC RECEDE A LITTLE ... MYRA SETS DOWN THE CHINA

JOHNNY:

(SMOOTH) How 'bout a dance, Myra?

MYRA:

(SURPRISED) Johnny! (CHUCKLES) You're sweet. But - but where's Susie?

JOHNNY:

(COULDN'T CARE LESS) She's off somewhere; I don't know. (SMOOTH AGAIN) I'd like to dance with you.

MYRA:

(PLAYFUL) An old lady like me? Well, if you're game, I am.

SOUND:

THEY WALK THROUGH KITCHEN DOOR TO GUESTS AND MUSIC

JOHNNY:

You're not old. There's nothing old about you.

MYRA:

(PLEASED CHUCKLE) No wonder all the girls are crazy about you. You know all the right things to say.

JOHNNY:

(BEAT) You're sure a smooth dancer, Myra.

MYRA:

All the girls here are smooth, Johnny.

JOHNNY:

Not like you, they're not.

MYRA:

(SEES SUSIE) Oh. Oh, there's Susie. She must have been out on the porch. Uh, you'd better finish the dance with her, Johnny.

JOHNNY:

Mm, there are lots of records. I'll dance with Suze -- later.

MUSIC:

BRIEF TRANSITION

SOUND:

CAR ENGINE REVS AND PULLS AWAY AS "GOOD NIGHTS" ARE EXCHANGED ... FRONT DOOR CLOSES ... MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS IN ... SHE STARTS CLEARING DISHES AND UTENSILS

MYRA:

(SINGS "PRISONER OF LOVE" WORDLESSLY TO HERSELF)

JOHNNY:

(SMOOTH) Hi.

MYRA:

(STOPS SINGING, STARTLED) Johnny! (INHALES, CHUCKLES) Why, you frightened me.

JOHNNY:

Sorry.

MYRA:

Oh, I thought everyone had gone.

JOHNNY:

Everyone has. Everyone else.

MYRA:

But where's Susie? I thought she was with you.

JOHNNY:

Oh, she's with Mary and Bill. They were going off to some corny drive-in. I told 'em I had to go home.

MYRA:

Oh. Well, you'd probably better be getting home, too, Johnny.

JOHNNY:

(BEAT) You don't really want me to go, do you?

MYRA:

(TEMPTED) Well-- It's late. (BEAT) Look, as long as you're here, there're all these dishes--

JOHNNY:

You don't want to do the dishes. Look, Myra, I haven't been around all summer just because of Suze. You know that.

MYRA:

Johnny, don't - don't talk like that.

JOHNNY:

You've known it. I know you have. Tonight, when we danced-- Well, you knew it then, Myra. I know you knew it then.

MYRA:

(IN DENIAL) You're a - good dancer and - and I like to dance.

JOHNNY:

(BEAT) I'm going to kiss you, Myra.

MYRA:

(WEAK PROTEST) Oh, Johnny, I-- (THEY KISS)

JOHNNY:

(EXHALES) There.

MYRA:

(INHALES)

MUSIC:

SNEAKS IN ... UNEASY

MYRA:

(WHISPERS INTENSELY) Oh, you shouldn't-- You shouldn't have done that.

MUSIC:

UP ... FOR AN UNCOMFORTABLE FINISH

ANNOUNCER:

We'll return to ROMANCE in just a moment. Still ahead today on most of these same stations, hear another exciting adventure on GUNSMOKE. It's the radio series that's been widely applauded for its high standards in adult western entertainment. You'll find it follows today's story of ROMANCE on many of these stations. Don't miss it. And follow the adventures of GUNSMOKE every Saturday at the Stars' Address. And now for the second act of ROMANCE.

MUSIC:

SECOND ACT INTRODUCTION ... THEN OUT

MYRA:

(DISTRAUGHT) Oh, my heavens. Johnny, I-- Oh! This is wrong. It's-- It's ugly. And it's wrong.

JOHNNY:

It wasn't ugly. It wasn't.

MYRA:

I don't know how it happened. But you've got to go now. Right now.

JOHNNY:

We wanted it to happen. All summer, Myra, we--

MYRA:

No! Don't say that. Don't think that. (BEAT) I don't know what to say. I'm sorry.

JOHNNY:

But you did want me to kiss you. A guy can tell. You wanted it, Myra. You did.

MYRA:

Oh, how can I make you see? It's - wrong. It should never have happened. It - it can never happen again.

JOHNNY:

The way you look-- The way you've looked at me. What did you think I'd do? How'd you think I'd feel?

MYRA:

I don't know. Believe me, I've never known so little as I know right now. (BEAT) Look. We'll forget it. You and I -- we're the only ones who know. It never happened, Johnny. We'll forget it. So it never happened.

JOHNNY:

(BEAT) You want me to go now?

MYRA:

Yes, yes, please go and-- (FORCED GAIETY) Come again soon and see Susie. Take her to the movies and football games, but-- Go home now, Johnny, and - and forget you ever came back tonight.

SOUND:

JOHNNY'S FOOTSTEPS STRIDE TO FRONT DOOR WHICH OPENS AND SHUTS AS HE EXITS

MYRA:

(TO HERSELF, ANGUISHED) Oh, please, God. Please forget it.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

DOORBELL RINGS ... MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR BEHIND--

MYRA:

(STILL SHAKEN, BUT PUTTING ON BEST FACE) Oh, Susie--? Susie--?

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR OPENS

MYRA:

You forget your keys, Su--? (SURPRISED) Oh. Why, Mary--

MARY:

(GOOD-NATURED) Wouldn't you know? I left my purse.

MYRA:

Oh, well, come in and look around. I - I haven't seen it, but--

SOUND:

MARY'S FOOTSTEPS, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--

MARY:

Well, I think it's right here on the hall table. (SLIGHTLY OFF) Oh, yes. Here it is.

MYRA:

Oh, I'm so glad.

MARY:

(RETURNS) Gee, I hope you don't mind my barging back this way, but I leave in the morning early and I-- What are you looking for, Myra?

MYRA:

(PUZZLED) Well, I guess Susie's still out in the car. I - I just kept expecting her to come in.

MARY:

Oh, well, Susie isn't with Bill and me.

MYRA:

But I thought Johnny said-- (CATCHES HERSELF) Well, no one said actually, but I thought I saw her go off with you and Bill.

MARY:

Well, right after the party, sure she did. But we brought her back.

MYRA:

(BEAT) Brought her back?

MARY:

Uh huh. We got almost to the drive-in and then, all of a sudden, Susie said, "Three's a crowd," and would we please bring her back home. So we did.

MYRA:

(UNEASY) Funny, I - I didn't hear her come in.

MARY:

Well, I'm just sure she did. We waited till we saw her up on the porch and -- she wouldn't let Bill bring her to the door -- she waved to us and so we drove off.

MYRA:

Oh. Well, she's probably in bed. I - I haven't looked there, but-- She was tired, I guess. And I was in the kitchen.

MARY:

Oh, well, I've gotta run. You know, you better go to bed, too, Myra. You look kind of tired.

MYRA:

I guess I am. Good night, Mary.

MARY:

Good night, Myra, and, gee, thanks again.

MYRA:

Don't mention it.

SOUND:

MARY'S FOOTSTEPS TO FRONT DOOR WHICH SHUTS AS SHE EXITS ... BEAT ... THEN MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS TO BEDROOM DOOR WHICH OPENS

MYRA:

Susie? You asleep yet? (NO ANSWER) Susie?

SOUND:

LAMP SWITCH

MYRA:

(NERVOUS, CALLS) Susie?!

SOUND:

MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS TO ANOTHER DOOR WHICH OPENS

MYRA:

(UPSET, CALLS) Susie, where are you?! Where--?!

SOUND:

PHONE RINGS

MYRA:

(STARTLED) Oh, my!

SOUND:

MYRA'S HURRIED FOOTSTEPS TO PHONE ... RECEIVER UP

MYRA:

(INTO PHONE) Hello?

NORA:

(FILTER, SERIOUS) It's Nora, Myra.

MYRA:

Oh, Nora. If it's about Johnny, he left a little while ago.

NORA:

(FILTER) No, no, no, it's not Johnny. It's Susie. She's here, Myra.

MYRA:

There? But--

NORA:

(FILTER) I - I think you'd better come right away.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

NORA'S FRONT DOOR OPENS ... MYRA'S FOOTSTEPS IN

MYRA:

Where is she, Nora? What's wrong with her?

NORA:

Well, she's quiet now. I think maybe she's even asleep. Come in, dear. Sit down.

SOUND:

THEY SIT BEHIND--

MYRA:

But, tell me, what happened? Is she hurt? Is she sick? What happened?

NORA:

I - I wish I could tell you, Myra, but I can't. I'll - I'll tell you all I know. Now, Mitch found her just wandering along the street not far from the house here.

MYRA:

Mitch?

NORA:

Yes, he drove Fred out to the airport. Mitch was on his way home when he saw her. It was late and, naturally, he stopped and offered to take her home. She was crying. By the time he got her here, she - she was hysterical.

MYRA:

But why didn't he bring her home?

NORA:

(BEAT) She said she didn't want to go home, Myra.

SOUND:

A DOOR OPENS ... SUSIE'S FOOTSTEPS IN ... MYRA GETS UP TO HUG HER

MYRA:

Susie! Oh, sweetie, I--

SUSIE:

(COOL) Hello, Myra. Don't. Please. I'm all right now.

MYRA:

(EXHALES) Of course you are, Susie. (WARMLY) You're coming home now.

SUSIE:

(TO NORA) I'm sorry, Mrs. Mitchell. I didn't mean to cause all this bother.

NORA:

Oh, now, you were no bother at all, Susie. Just run along home and get a good night's sleep. You, too, Myra dear.

MYRA:

(LIGHTLY) We will -- now. Thanks for everything, Nora. Come along, Susie.

SUSIE:

I'm coming, Myra. I'm coming.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

AUTO ENGINE PURRS IN BG

MYRA:

What was it, Susie? What happened to you tonight?

SUSIE:

I'd rather not talk about it. I'm tired. I just want to get to bed.

MYRA:

We're almost home. But you've never done anything like this before. Surely you can tell me what's wrong.

SUSIE:

I just don't want to talk about it, Myra. Please.

MYRA:

But - but it's not like you not to talk to me--

SUSIE:

(SNAPS) Please leave me alone!

MYRA:

(REPROVING) Susie--

SUSIE:

I'm sorry.

MYRA:

(BEAT) It's wrong -- it's terribly wrong -- to keep things pent up inside yourself. It's hard on you, Susie. I'm not thinking about myself, but--

SUSIE:

(GIVES IN) All right, all right. I want to go away to school.

MYRA:

Away? Why? Everything's here for you -- your home, your friends, me.

SUSIE:

I want to go away. Mary's school maybe. Something like that. (SIGHS) There now. I've told you.

MYRA:

I don't know what to say. I - I can't believe you'd want to go. I - I thought I'd made our home the kind of place you'd want to stay.

SUSIE:

You'll miss the driveway, Myra.

MYRA:

Oh.

SOUND:

AUTO SLOWS AND TURNS INTO DRIVEWAY ... ENGINE OUT ... NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS, ET CETERA)

MYRA:

Why, Susie? Why do you want to leave me?

SUSIE:

I told you, I don't want to go into it tonight. I didn't want to tell you anything, but you insisted, insisted.

MYRA:

But I've a right to know. I'm your mother.

SUSIE:

(BITTER, ACCUSING) I wish you were. I could use a mother.

SOUND:

MYRA SLAPS SUSIE

MYRA:

(INTENSE) Don't ever say that again.

SUSIE:

(CONTROLS HERSELF) I think maybe I'd better say it all now, Myra. I want to go away to school for the same reason Mary Fleming goes away to school.

MYRA:

She's sent away. Mary told me that herself this evening. She said other things, too, Susie. She said she wished her mother were like me.

SUSIE:

She is. She's just like you. Do you want me to tell you how?

MYRA:

(UNEASY) I - I don't think there's any need for unpleasant talk.

SUSIE:

You asked for the talk, Myra. It is unpleasant. It's rotten in spots. But I'm gonna say it all -- so you'll be sure to understand.

MYRA:

All right. All right.

SUSIE:

Mary's mother can't stand the thought of growing old, either. So she sends Mary away. She doesn't want any reminders around--

MYRA:

But I want you with me. That's a difference -- a big difference!

SUSIE:

But you won't let me be a daughter to you, either. You've got to be young again. You've got to dress like me and act like me, and plan parties so you're always surrounded by young people. It's the same thing, Myra. The same thing.

MYRA:

This is what you were crying about tonight, when Mitch found you? Why didn't you come home? Why were you wandering off like that?

SUSIE:

I came home, Myra. I came home first. I told myself all evening -- just as I've done all summer long -- I told myself that none of it was true.

MYRA:

None of what was true?

SUSIE:

Johnny. Poor stupid Johnny. (MORE IN PITY THAN ANGER) How could you, Myra? How could you?

MYRA:

(EXHALES) Oh, you - you saw?

SUSIE:

I saw. And I ran. Ran as fast and as hard and as far as I could. Like maybe if I got far enough away, I'd - I'd know it wasn't true, that I hadn't seen it.

MYRA:

(BREAKS DOWN AND WEEPS, APOLOGETIC) Susie-- Susie--

SUSIE:

Then I began to put it all together -- for the first time. The looks I thought I'd seen before, between you and Johnny. When he asked you to dance, at first I - I thought what a nice thing it was for him to do. But tonight-- Tonight, it looked wrong. And ugly. And I was ashamed.

MYRA:

(EXHALES WEARILY THROUGH TEARS) I'm ashamed. I'm so utterly ashamed.

SUSIE:

I feel so sorry -- for Johnny. He'll - he'll be all mixed up. A long time, I guess. And I can't help him. I can't even see him.

MYRA:

Well, of course you can. You must see Johnny, and go to the games, and movies, and parties, and have fun.

SUSIE:

Oh, you know we can't. How could we?

MYRA:

(DESPERATE) Well, we could forget it. All of us. We could forget it so well it didn't happen! If we try! If we try -- all of us -- we can forget it, Susie!

SUSIE:

If you believe that, I'm sorry for you, Myra. Really sorry. I was sorry for you before, 'cause I thought you were trying to make me happy. You did so much for me. And you were all alone.

MYRA:

(TEARFUL) I need you. I can't be all alone. If I have you-- Oh, Susie, you can't leave me. (SOBS) You can't! (CONTINUES TO WEEP IN BG)

SUSIE:

I have to. Or I'll stop just being ashamed and sorry and sick inside -- and I'll hate you, Myra. I'll hate you all my life. Maybe, if I go away now--

MYRA:

Maybe what?

SUSIE:

Maybe you'll have a chance -- for yourself. And maybe - I will, too.

MYRA:

(WEEPS)

MUSIC:

FOR A MELANCHOLY FINISH

ANNOUNCER:

ROMANCE is produced and directed by William Froug. You have heard "A Girl's Best Friend," specially written for ROMANCE by Kathleen Hite, starring Barbara Whiting and Doris Singleton. Featured in the cast were Keith Vincent, Virginia Eiler and Sammie Hill. This is Dan Cubberly inviting you to hear ROMANCE transcribed next week at this same time.

MUSIC:

THEME ... TILL END

ANNOUNCER:

Folk songs and hillbilly hits galore come your way tonight on CBS Radio's SATURDAY NIGHT COUNTRY STYLE, bringing rural rhythm to all America every Saturday night on most of these stations. Stay tuned now for GUNSMOKE which follows immediately over most of these same stations.