Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Miscellaneous Single Episodes
Show: The Story of Treasure Island
Date: Sep 29 1940

"The Story of Treasure Island" was a monster special, broadcast over the National Broadcasting Company, the Columbia Broadcasting System, the Mutual Broadcasting System and independent stations celebrating the end of the 1939-40 "Golden Gate International Exposition" or San Francisco World's Fair ,and the man made island in the San Fransisco Bay that was home to it.

ANNOUNCER:

The Golden Gate International Exposition and the California Commission present the story of Treasure Island.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

(Slowly, with deep feeling) The Story of Treasure Island. Where the tide once ruled, tonight she stands . . . and she will always stand. Not sand, not rock and steel and stone, but stronger than all of these . . . for Treasure Island was born in the hearts and minds and souls of men in a country so great and free. The story of Treasure Island . . . a story of those who crossed her path . . . the men who dream and the men who toil and sweat and build. A tribute to everyone . . . great and small . . . who gave this great adventure something of themselves.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

ANNOUNCER:

February 25th, nineteen hundred and thirty-three!!!

NARRATOR:

Into the office of the San Francisco News walks one Joseph Ellsmore Dixon, native son, salesman and a man with an idea . . .

DIXON:

San Francisco's building the two greatest bridges in the world . . . and the day is not far off when a third bridge, huge Clipper ships, will link San Francisco with the Orient and Asia. This Bay Area, I tell you, is mighty! It has grown, and will continue to grow, and we ought to tell the whole world about it! (Pause) I think San Francisco ought to stage a great World's Fair!

VOICES:

(Pause and then slowly, musingly) Well-I-I . . . Why not? Why not? (Off mike and louder) Why not? (Farther off mike and louder) Why not?

MUSIC:

(Coming in with Agitato to build up with ensuing montage.) (Moving off mike and lines "Why not, why not, why not?" in chorus building to musical climax.)

NARRATOR:

(On cue) As every lovely flower is first a humble, tiny seed that must take root in fertile soil, be nourished and cared for and cultivated, so did Joseph Dixon's vision of a great World's Fair begin to grow.

VOICE:

Editorial! . . .

VOICE 2:

This newspaper endorses Mr. Dixon's idea to have San Francisco sponsor a World's Fair . . . recommends city-wide consideration of the plan . . .

SOUND:

Rap, rap, rap of gavel.

ANNOUNCER:

1934!

MAN:

Motion made and seconded that the Sunrise Breakfast Club go on record that San Francisco stage a World's Fair . . . (fading off mike) . . . to celebrate the two great bridges and to tell the world of western progress, industry, travel, recreation . . .

VOICES:

(Shout) All in favor?!! (several) Aye! (Shout) No? . . . Carried!

SOUND:

Rap, rap, rap of gavel.

MAN:

Motion carried . . . that the South of Market Boys heartily endorse a World's Fair to be held in San Francisco . . .

SOUND:

Background rapping of gavel, not constant but spaced throughout narrator's ensuing beginning lines, cut when music sneaks in.

NARRATOR:

Meeting after meeting of San Francisco's civic, improvement, merchant and social groups . . . and like fire in the dry autumn, the World's Fair idea grew hot and strong and spread across the city. Junior and Senior Chambers of Commerce . . . informal little groups meeting in small rooms above San Francisco's famous streets in old North Beach, along the water front, along Market Street and in every nook and corner of the city by the Golden Gate. Men's groups and women's organizations.

MUSIC:

(San Francisco--sneaking in.)

NARRATOR:

And once again the city which men may leave but never forget, where tradition still marches at the side of progress, stirred with the rumblings of this new chance to bid for the spotlight of all the nations throughout the world . . . the city proud of her people, a people proud of their city. SAN FRANCISCO!

MUSIC:

San Francisco up and to finish.

SOUND:

Fade in crowd noise.

ANNOUNCER:

1934!

NARRATOR:

Responding to the will of a people audacious enough to tackle the creation of the world's two greatest bridges at the same time, Angelo Joseph Rossi, carnation-wearing mayor of San Francisco, aided by dynamic city administrator Alfred John Deary, appointed a Citizen's Committee to probe this new business of staging a great World's Fair. Out of that Citizen's Committee came men whose names will linger on among the memories that Treasure Island has etched in the hearts of millions.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

ANNOUNCER:

1935!

MUSIC:

Maestoso March (Fade to)

NARRATOR:

(On cue) Man's greatest task is the conversion of his finest dreams into living reality. The visions, and dreams and thoughts are great only when men use them as inspiration, and change them, as the chemist makes the tangible from the intangible, into something that all mankind can see, and touch, and use. To Architect George William Kelham, and to Engineer William Peyton Day, went the task of finding a site for this World's Fair that was conceived, but as yet far from created.

MUSIC:

Agitato (Sneak in)

NARRATOR:

In spite of differences of opinion, engineer and architect Day and Kelham patiently, methodically, carry on their work, and turn to a spot that four years before, the San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce had suggested as a future downtown airport for the Northern Pacific Coast.

VOICES:

Can you imagine that!!! Surveying the Yerba Buena Shoals for a world's fair site . . . Yeah! . . . Gonna have a floating fair! . . . (Derisive laughter) (Fade out).

MUSIC:

Out.

NARRATOR:

With funds allotted to the Citizens' Committee for San Francisco's World's Fair, Kelham and Day take soundings over a mile square stretch of water off the Yerba Buena Shoals.

SOUND:

Crowd noise, fade in.

VOICES:

Why it's 30 feet deep a mile out! . . . Take you ten years to dredge her out! . . . And then the tides wear it away again . . . We built the two greatest bridges, didn't we? . . . Somebody's crazy to think of turnin' water into dry land . . . But it would be a wonderful spot for a World's Fair! . . . And a marvelous airport . . . right downtown almost! . . . How'd you get from the bridge to the Island? Huh?

SOUND:

Crowd noise up, and blend with airplane fading to

NARRATOR:

But San Francisco has always played stakes for millions . . . has loved the impossible, the daring, the audacious, and perhaps the thought of creating the largest island man had ever built . . . with voices raised to say, "It can't be done" . . . served only to give the Press this story.

NEWSBOY:

Extra . . . Extra . . . All about the Fair. (Fading) All about the Fair.

SOUND:

(Airplane up and out.)

NARRATOR:

With Mr. and Mrs. San Francisco supporting a World's Fair on an island yet to be torn from the bottom of San Francisco Bay, two men accept the task of touching Uncle Sam for a few million dollars to begin the mighty job.

(Strings -- sustained low "G" -- throughout the following sequence.)

PAGE:

Mr. Cutler and Mr. Creel to see the President.

2 VOICES:

Thank you.

SOUND:

Close doors.

VOICES:

Say, wasn't that George Creel that went in to see the President? . . . Yeah. Handled propaganda during the World War. Who's the other fellow? . . . Lei and Cutler, President of the San Francisco World's Fair . . . You don't mean it? When are they going to hold that? . . . That's probably being settled behind those closed doors right now.

SOUND:

Doors open.

ROOSEVELT:

(Laughs) George, you and Lee are thinking about a World's Fair, but I'm thinking airport.

MUSIC:

(Bridge).

NARRATOR:

To one Leland W. Cutler, first President of the Golden Gate International Exposition, and to one George Creel, its United States Commissioner, who so clung to their task that many said they became commuters between San Francisco and the Nation's Capitol--a salute for a great day that brought to first dawn of life an island destined to be known throughout the world as--Treasure Island.

MUSIC:

(Up to finish).

ANNOUNCER:

February, 1936.

CUTLER:

(Fading in) And so, gentlemen, the period of negotiation has ended. Work . . . actual work, may begin at once. From PWA and WPA, a sum in excess of six million dollars has been granted, contingent upon the use of the Exposition site as a San Francisco municipal air terminal . . .

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

Beneath the shadow of the mighty Bay Bridges . . . another mighty task begins . . . to wrest from God the mud and sand buried beneath His tides and waves . . .

MUSIC:

Maestoso -- fade to

VOICES:

America her Government . . . Her Army engineers . . . Her industry . . . Her labor . . . Dredges pumping black sand . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . (Fade) Day and night . . . Dredges working . . . Twenty million cubic yards . . . Island getting bigger . . . Going's getting tougher . . . Mud and muck . . . A mile of mud . . . Tides a-washin' . . . In and out! . . . Machinery and engineers . . . Men, men, more men . . . Dollars, millions of 'em . . . A World's Fair . . . An airport . . . Day by day . . . Month by month . . . A-workin' and a-sweatin' . . . Swell view from here, ain't it? Somebody's crazy! They'll never plant trees and flowers in this ground . . . Mud and salt . . . Raining! . . . Raining! Raining! Raining . . . raining . . . raining . . . raining. (Fade, etc.)

VOICES:

Ferry slips are nearly done . . . Digging foundations for airplane hangars! Pan American's going to set its Clipper ships down here . . . Man, machines and shovels! . . . Earth torn from the ocean floor! . . . Mortar, clay, cement, fulfilling dreams of men.

MUSIC:

(Up and out.)

NARRATOR:

The sun came out to dry this new Island off the Yerba Buena Shoals, and joined the fever heat of organization to build, to sell and promote the World's Fair of Western America.

ANNOUNCER:

1937!

NARRATOR:

Long before the eighteen months' task of building the Island was done, President Leland W. Cutler's emissaries were combing the Nation, and all the nations bordering the Pacific.

MUSIC:

(Latin American music.)

VOICE 1:

(Spanish Accent) Si, si, Senor . . . The Government of Peru is happy to accept the invitation of the Golden Gate International Exposition.

MUSIC:

(Up and fade.)

VOICE 2:

. . . and sees in your World's Fair an opportunity to further human happiness and the brotherhood of Nations.

MUSIC:

(Up and fade.)

NARRATOR:

(On cue) The land of the gaucho . . . Argentina accepts . . . we'll build a great pavilion of glass and steel . . .

MUSIC:

(Up and fade.)

NARRATOR:

Colombia . . . Chile . . . Ecuador.

VOICE 1:

Mighty Brazil will build a pavilion . . . will serve her coffee and play her famous music . . .

MUSIC:

(Up and fade.)

NARRATOR:

Guatemala and Panama . . . El Salvador . . . Mexico.

MUSIC:

(Up and fade.)

NARRATOR:

Plans forged ahead . . . for palaces that would sparkle like stars that line the milky way . . . houses of industry, of science, of medicine . . . palaces to show the great farm products of all the West . . . plans for beauty that would live beyond its death . . . magic carpets of flowers and lights that would do man's bidding, as did Aladdin's Lamp. Month after month, more of the Nations throughout the World sent word that when the great day came they would be a vivid, living part of the spectacle on San Francisco Bay.

MUSIC:

(International cue.)

VOICES:

France and Italy . . . Japan . . . Norway . . . Johore . . . Netherlands-East Indies . . . Australia and Indo-China . . . New Zealand . . . our own Hawaii . . . The Philippines . . .

MUSIC:

(Full and out.)

NARRATOR:

The World had heard and had replied.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

Governor Merriam sets up the California Commission. Five million dollars are allotted to place the Golden State in the spotlight of the World . . . to show her fabulous counties . . . her history . . . her agriculture, livestock, travel, and recreation, to play a vital, leading role in this daring venture on San Francisco Bay.

MUSIC:

"California Here I Come" -- Segue Allegro Cue.

NARRATOR:

One forgotten day, Clyde M. Vandeberg, young, curly-haired director of publicity, sits with other young men, who are his right hands of press, magazines, radio, photography . . .

SOUND:

(Small crowd noise.)

VOICE:

It's a name the whole world knows already . . . People will say we stole it from Robert Louis Stevenson . . . But it's perfect--describes the Island and the Fair . . . (thoughtfully) Hmmmmmmm . . . Treasure Island . . . (Slightly louder) Treasure Island . . . boys . . . that's it . . . Treasure Island!

MUSIC:

(Up and out.) -- Segue Agitato -- Fade to

NARRATOR:

Often in this Twentieth Century, the problem of advertising real estate, oranges, and ocean playgrounds is best solved by lovely girls, and so it was with Treasure Island. In the same little publicity office, cluttered with typewriters, blue pencils and black coffee came, where the name Treasure Island was born the second time, a brain-storm caused a beautiful young woman, Zoe Dell Lantis, to listen to instruction from Publicity Man Vandeberg . . .

LANTIS:

I'm to wear this? Why . . . it hardly covers me.

VANDEBERG:

All you have to do Miss Lantis, is wear that pirate costume and sell Treasure Island to every city in the Nation. Travel and see the country . . . You don't like it, huh?

LANTIS:

Like it . . . I love it . . . when do I leave?

MUSIC:

Agitato up and fade to

SOUND:

Train, airplane, automobile, etc. Fade to Narrator, on cue:

NARRATOR:

Zoe Dell Lantis, photogenic in her tattered buccaneer's costume, became Treasure Island's Pirate Girl in a thousand American cities. Amazing, uncanny, was the fact that wherever went the Pirate Girl, there was a camera and flash bulb waiting.

ANNOUNCER:

Oregon.

NARRATOR:

Pirate Girl rolls logs in a lumber mill pond.

ANNOUNCER:

Wyoming.

NARRATOR:

Treasure Island's Pirate Girl stunt rides in rodeo.

ANNOUNCER:

New York City.

NARRATOR:

Pirate Girl poses with Fiorella LaGuardia.

LaGUARDIA:

Zoe Dell, you tell that Mayor of yours, Rossi, to think up some excuse for me to take a trip out there to Treasure Island.

VOICE 1:

Fifty thousand pictures . . . seventy-five . . . (Music fades out) . . . thousand miles . . . Treasure Island's Pirate Girl became the Nation's most photographed young beauty.

NARRATOR:

Meanwhile Publicity Dynamo Vandeberg was hammering on the office doors of Governors' offices in all the Western States, and getting acceptances.

ANNOUNCER:

1938!

NARRATOR:

Treasure Island's huge Administration Building, stone and steel heart of the future West's mightiest airport is completed, and before a banquet of a thousand civic leaders from all the West, America's number one citizen makes a famous statement . . .

ROOSEVELT:

When you people out here in the West do a thing you seem to do it better than anyone else in the world.

SOUND:

Roar of applause.

MUSIC:

National Emblem March.

NARRATOR:

Hectic months were those of 1938. To hundreds of Treasure Island officials, to thousands of sweating workmen builders, painters, electricians, gardeners, work became a sleepless nightmare, ruled over by the deadline day, February 18th, 1939. As that day approached, a meeting was held in the office of the individual who as much as any one man helped to mould an idea into a gigantic city of pleasure on the world's greatest man-made Island . . . President Leland W. Cutler.

VOICE 1:

Major O. F. J. Keatinge, reporting on foreign participation.

KEATINGE:

Since November, 1936, when President Roosevelt issued the proclamation inviting the Nations of the earth to participate in America's official 1939 World's Fair of the Pacific, the Governments of foreign countries have looked forward with increasing interest to participating in the Golden Gate International Exposition. So great has been the response to invitations . . . so thorough are the displays these nations have sent here, that I am satisfied, more than satisfied, that Treasure Island's four hundred acres can provide every man with a tour of the World . . . that this Exposition will be an international exposition where each nation offers its good works, and its friendship, to all nations.

CUTLER:

Thank you, Major Keatinge . . . yours was a big job . . . and you did it as we knew you would . . .

VOICE 1:

Mr. F. M. Sandusky, reporting on exhibits.

SANDUSKY:

Gentlemen, more than 350 outstanding American industries are exhibiting at the Exposition, either in their own building, or with splendid displays in the great exhibit halls that radiate from the Tower of the Sun. All who may doubt the progress that industry and labor have created in these United States may see, at this Exposition, the material benefits of living and of working in a free democracy.

VOICE 1:

Mr. William Day, director of public works.

DAY:

Treasure Island will be physically complete on opening day, February 18th. The six great blocks of exhibit palaces, one million square feet, are ready. And, with Julius Girod and the beloved John McLaren, we have actually given Treasure Island a bath, pumping millions of gallons of fresh water through the soil to remove the salt. Treasure Island will be a paradise of flowers.

VOICE 1:

Vandeberg and publicity.

VANDEBERG:

We believe that through wonderful cooperation from the Press, the magazines and radio, and from industry and its advertising, Treasure Island is better publicized than the Forty-Nine Gold Rush.

VOICE:

Executive Secretary H. C. Bottorff on finance.

BOTTORFF:

You already know the story of the splendid Federal participation. To that vital beginning has been added over six million, four hundred fifty thousand dollars raised by business and industrial interests in the Bay Area; five million dollars from the State of California; one million dollars from the Western States; two million dollars more for exhibits of the United States Government, and approximately six million dollars advance revenue received from Foreign Governments, exhibitors, concessionnaires, ticket sales and so forth. Our financial structure is sound and assures the opening of the Exposition.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

From every city, state and county in America, and all over the world . . . proving the amazing interest in this, the ninth world fair in six years . . . a half million people submit names for Treasure Island's amusement zone . . .

RADIO ANNOUNCER:

(Fading in) Good evening listeners everywhere in the West . . . from this microphone in the headquarters of the Golden Gate International Exposition we are going to bring you, in just a second, a thousand dollar name that twenty million Americans will be speaking during 1939. Remember the Pike at the 1906 St. Louis Exposition . . . The Zone at our own 1915 Fair . . .

VOICE 1:

One moment, please . . .

ANNOUNCER:

The name is . . . "THE GAYWAY!"

MUSIC:

Gayway music.

SOUND:

Sirens, whistles, bells and stuff.

ANNOUNCER:

February 18th, 1939.

MUSIC:

Fanfare (16 bar fanfare, 1939.)

ANNOUNCER:

High noon on Treasure Island, and by radio to all the Nation, and to the countries around the World, we bring you the official opening ceremonies of the Golden Gate International Exposition . . .

NARRATOR:

And here is your host, Mr. Leland W. Cutler, President of this World's Fair of Western America . . .

SOUND:

Applause.

CUTLER:

(with feeling) I have waited four years for this moment, waited as a mother waits for her child's first step . . . waited as a man who builds an ocean-going ship . . . and with bated breath, watches it slide down into the water. Today our Exposition which we have been building, becomes your Exposition. Treasure Island is offered today, upon the altar of greater peace, and greater good will, among all the nations, among all the races.

MUSIC:

Male chorus "The Bells of Treasure Island."

NARRATOR:

And to Treasure Island where thousands pack this Federal Plaza, came another message on California's greatest day of '39 . . . this message from far-off Florida, in a tiny broadcasting room aboard a titan of the United States Navy . . .

ROOSEVELT:

As the boundaries of human intercourse are widened by giant strides of trade and travel, it is of vital import that the bonds of human understanding be maintained, enlarged and strengthened rapidly. Unity of the Pacific nations is America's concern and responsibility . . . their onward progress deserves now a recognition that will be a stimulus as well. May this, America's World's Fair on the Pacific, in 1939, truly serve all nations in symbolizing their achievements of all the ages past . . . and in amalgamating their destinies . . . one with every other--through all the ages to come.

NARRATOR:

(Powerfully) You remember that day, February 18th, 1939? The dream of a few men, now the possession of all men! Treasure Island's moment had come! It now belonged to the world.

VOICE:

Culbert L. Olson, Governor of the Golden State . . .

GOVERNOR:

As Governor of the State of California, it is much more than an honor to invite you, the nation, to visit with us here on Treasure Island. Somehow, we of California and the West look upon this Exposition as our opportunity to repay the people of an entire nation for what they have given to us . . . for our West is not mighty merely because of its mountains, its limitless desert, its great valleys which send food to the whole world . . . but rather because it is a great melting pot into which this free land has poured thousands of souls, who believed that America's frontiers can ever be expanded. Today, proud of Treasure Island, another great Western achievement, we also give thanks, to this nation, for our heritage.

VOICE:

The Mayor of San Francisco . . . the Honorable Angelo J. Rossi!

ROSSI:

(Measured) The West has given to San Francisco the honor and responsibility of forging the beginnings of the Golden Gate International Exposition, and to act as host city in welcoming the world to participate in a celebration dedicated to the future of the Pacific Empire. As Chief Executive of "The City That Knows How," I assure you that your journey to Treasure Island will be worth while, your visit filled with hours of entertainment and interest and your memory stored with pleasure.

NARRATOR:

That day, February 18th, 1939 . . . a man's voice went to his native land which he had not seen in many a day. Dean of the Consular Corps in San Francisco, handsome son of golden Peru--Senor Fernando Berckemeyer's message of good will between North and South America, flashed by short-wave radio to North and South America . . .

CONSUL:

In the life of every man there comes one great moment.  I have met that moment today. Treasure Island is good proof that dreams are not in vain . . . and perhaps what we find here--many nations, all races and colors and creeds of mankind--may mean that another dream may some day be not in vain . . . a world fashioned from the lovely picture of Treasure Island.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

The world that was Treasure Island, on February 18th, 1939, saw these nations in review.

MUSIC:

Grand March. (At this point girls representing the different governments participating pass in review and are identified as they present themselves.)

NARRATOR:

In this parade of nations, as in Treasure Island's countless parades in '39 and '40 . . . parades of civic, fraternal and social groups . . . cities and counties and states . . . the trim, brightly clad Treasure Island Band under the direction of Ralph Murray, played a colorful, leading role. And so came to a close the opening day of ceremonies of Treasure Island--an island dedicated to peace and good will among the Nations of the World.

MUSIC:

"America"--fade to

MINISTER:

Our Father, who art in Heaven, bless this day . . . bless this Island, symbol of peace and good will among all men . . . watch over, and preserve this Nation . . . grant us always the privilege of great dreams . . . (fade) . . . give us always, as we have today, the strength and the courage to strive for progress and achievement . . .

MUSIC:

America--Up to finish (Chorus Sings.)

NARRATOR:

Following that momentous day in 1939, the people began to poke into every nook and corner of Treasure Island . . . to see the flowers, to watch the magic lights, the beaver in the Oregon exhibit, the baby kangaroo from Australia . . . to listen as lucky folks won free long distance calls; chatting with polite soldiers explaining bombers and national defense. And there:

MUSIC:

(Sanborn specialty.)

VOICE:

Do you remember . . .

NARRATOR:

Cavalcade of the Golden West.

CAVALCADE NARRATOR:

1862--and the cry of "Westward Ho!" again is heard from Coast to Coast . . . but now the cry is for stronger ties, for bands of steel to bridge the wilderness, joining East with West for the nation of tomorrow. From the East in Council Bluffs starts the Union Pacific, and from the Pacific Coast in Sacramento, the strong men of the Central Pacific, Stanford, Huntington, Hopkins, and the Crockers, begin with Engineer Judah, the incredible task of scaling the High Sierra. Finally, on May 10th, 1869, at Promontory Point in Utah, the rival roads come together, as the nation stops to watch . . .

VOICE:

And here, ladies and gentlemen, is the President of the Central Pacific Railroad, with a spike of pure gold, which he will drive into the last tie, made of California laurel. I present Governor Leland Stanford of California.

SOUND:

Applause.

STANFORD:

. . . we should tender thanks to God for the completion of this great work, and pray that the way is now made ready for the next chapter in the glowing history of the West. Following these rails of steel will come the pioneers of the industrial frontier . . . the builders who will create America's new Empire in the Golden West.

SOUND:

Tapping of spike.

SOUND:

Locomotive whistles.

SOUND:

Big crowd noise.

CAVALCADE NARRATOR:

Thus, the meeting of the rails, May 10th, 1869, and the bridging of our own industrial age with the romantic days of the trappers, the missionaries, the covered wagons, and the Pony Express. Thus the CAVALCADE OF THE GOLDEN WEST!

MUSIC:

Fanfare--Segue to classical selection.

NARRATOR:

(Cue) One of the greatest exhibits on Treasure Island was the Palace of Fine and Decorative Arts, guided by Dorothy Wright Liebes, Dr. Langdon Warner, Dr. Walter Heil, and Roland J. McKinney. Paintings that heretofore had been only legends and tiny reprints in cultural magazines, were now on Treasure Island . . . Botticelli's "Birth of Venus" . . . Raphael's "Madonna of the Chair" . . . the works of Michelangelo . . . Titian, Tintoretto and Donatello. The finest arts of the 48 states . . . Gothic tapestries, Renaissance sculptures . . . a Palace more priceless than the palaces of a hundred kings. Another invaluable contribution to the beauty and joy of this Exposition has been that of the Women's Board, under the chairmanship of Mrs. George T. Cameron, working faithfully from the difficult days of 1936 . . . the building of the Yerba Buena club . . . assuming the leadership in entertainment, in social affairs that made this Treasure Island more friendly, more human, more real.

MUSIC:

Up to full and finish--segue--drums.

NARRATOR:

As Treasure Island and 1939 rolled on, summertime's gala new reopening ushered in a new General Manager, Doctor Charles Henry Strub . . .

VOICE:

Flying today from Southern California to spend this last night upon Treasure Island . . . Doctor Charley Strub . . .

STRUB:

Many men have served Treasure Island. I was among that fortunate group. Each of us was proud to serve in his own humble way . . . and as I look back, tonight, I realize that we felt a privilege in serving . . . for we served something bigger than the biggest of men . . . something more than men. The contribution to Treasure Island which I was able to make will be lived over again at this moment . . . and I deeply appreciate having Time turned back, to let me live those days over once again . . .

NARRATOR:

Dr. Charles Henry Strub brought with him brilliant new entertainment to serve youth and to serve the old, with young ideas. A parade of stars . . . Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy, Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Jack Haley and Rubinoff , and a parade of music. The greatest parade of name bands ever assembled in one season. A parade that was led by the King of Swing, Benny Goodman.

MUSIC:

One Chorus of a Benny Goodman number.

NARRATOR:

Second in the line of march in this great parade of America's name bands came another. Who was it? Don't you know? Students? . . .

EVERYBODY SAY:

Kay Kyser.

MUSIC:

Kay Kyser Chorus--fade to

VOICES:

What will be the darkest place on San Francisco Bay the night of September 30th? . . . Uh-huh . . . Students . . . ? Treasure Island ! ! !

MUSIC:

Kyser Chorus--up to finish.

NARRATOR:

Temple Compound saw bands to suit the taste of everyone. Hot . . sweet . . . rhythmic . . . and smart . . . the last of which was perhaps best exemplified by that king of the ivories . . . Eddie Duchin.

MUSIC:

Chorus--Duchin number.

NARRATOR:

An old timer was not to be denied . . . with his clarinet and his hat with a silver lining, he was there to ask:

VOICE:

Is everybody happy?

MUSIC:

Chorus of Ted Lewis number.

NARRATOR:

And on they came . . . George Olsen, Smilin' Phil Harris, Harry Owens and his Royal Hawaiians, and that juggler of jive, Count Basie . . .

MUSIC:

Count Basie number.

NARRATOR:

American music for an American era, on America's newest city of pleasure, with rhythm that set the feet a-tapping and brought smiles into the hearts of those who came to this land of Aladdin to find the dreams of their youth.

ANNOUNCER:

October 29th, 1939!

NARRATOR:

Treasure Island on this date turned down its light in a world growing darker hour by hour. Somehow the scene from San Francisco's seven hills had saddened. At night the mighty bridges still decked the bay with golden necklaces of light, and the skyline glowed with warmth . . . but many a man could not subdue the feeling that something had died on San Francisco Bay . . . something that should not have died . . . but along the city streets a few men chose to say . . . Treasure Island has not died . . . it's just a blackout.

VOICE 1:

(Well off mike) Black-out!

SOUND:

Airplane effects . . . air raids . . . bombing, etc.

VOICE 2:

Czechoslovakia! Remember?

NARRATOR:

Yes . . . yes, we do remember . . . Her lovely exhibit out there on Treasure Island.

VOICE 1:

Blackout!

SOUND:

Air raid effects up.

VOICE 2:

Little Holland . . . Do you remember?

SOUND:

Up and fade to

NARRATOR:

Remember little Holland? Yes . . . on a day when 40,000 tulip bulbs came to Treasure Island . . . a gift from little Holland.

SOUND:

Add muffled thunder of guns to air raid sounds.

VOICE 3:

And what gift for Holland now . . . will tulips lie rotting upon graves that bombs will dig to swallow up a new generation?

VOICE 1:

Remember the words . . .

SOUND:

Gradually fading out with following speech:

VOICE 2:

(Slow fade on entire speech) That this Exposition will be an international Exposition, where each nation offers its good works and its friendship to all other nations . . .

VOICE 1:

There were other words from Washington.

ROOSEVELT:

May this Fair serve all Nations, in symbolizing their achievements . . . in amalgamating their destinies, one with every other . . . through all the ages to come.

NARRATOR:

Through all the ages to come.

SOUND:

Cannonading of guns and screaming of bombs up and blend with "Maestoso March." Fade down and music to narrator.

NARRATOR:

It is American to feel the sharp pangs of sorrow and sympathy for all those lands where the power lines of freedom have been cut . . . it is also American to be strong, to keep strong by the preservation of our great achievements, and so it was that in a famed hotel atop historic Nob Hill in San Francisco one George D. Smith pledged himself that Treasure Island would come to life again.

VOICES:

Board of Directors votes to liquidate . . . Let's take a gamble and open again . . . The travel agencies will back it . . . The contractors say "Yes" . . . George Smith, Dan London . . . the hotels . . . All right . . . raise one million, four hundred and fifty thousand dollars . . . and open Treasure Island for 1940 . . . Activities started and rosey reports showed that all was well . . . But on October 19th, another voice, "the jig was up." The quota set--had failed.

SOUND:

Ticking of telegraph.

NARRATOR:

Trump playing George Smith, played a last ace . . . sent telegrams to one hundred and eight concessionnaires of the '39 Fair and, in a long, sweaty meeting with these men, big tycoons and little hot-dog men, the first chapter in a NEW Treasure Island was written.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

ANNOUNCER:

On May 25th, 1940, the Fair will open!

NARRATOR:

Electric words.

VOICES:

The Fair will open! . . . The Fair will open! . . . The Fair will open!

MUSIC:

As "The Fair Will Open" line begins, enter music softly, with a fast agitato.

NARRATOR:

Aided by the great names who conceived and built the '39 spectacle on Treasure Island . . . eminent San Franciscan, Marshall Dill, accepted the presidency of a new and streamlined Treasure Island and to the vital post of general manager, came young University of California graduate manager, and Chamber of Commerce executive, William W. Monahan.

MUSIC:

Fanfare--Direct to segue to rhumba, fade to

ANNOUNCER:

And then--FIESTA.

SOUND:

Celebration noises, horns, ratchets, etc.

NARRATOR:

Yes, fiesta. Fiesta in San Francisco, and throughout all the Bay Area. Into this amazing scene of amazing people, costumed in the glorious colors of the old West, singing on the city streets, went the energies of bank president Parker S. Maddux, and public relations man Donald V. Nicholson. But greater than Fiesta--the fever of a population that had grown to love its Treasure Island and so throughout the entire week preceding May the 25th, work nearly stopped as men and women and children caught the spirit of the Fair in '40.

MUSIC:

Up and finish.

ANNOUNCER:

May 25th, 1940.

NARRATOR:

May the 25th, nineteen hundred and forty! Around the world a trumpet call.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

And the 1940 World Premiere of Treasure Island is on.

MUSIC:

"Waltz of the Flowers"--fade to

NARRATOR:

(On cue) Where the great Pacific meets the sky, a flush of gold remains. The silver stars are out, and San Francisco wears her evening gems. In semi-darkness sits a mighty crowd awaiting that moment when the night will be drenched with the splendor of the magic lights of a new and streamlined Treasure Island.

MUSIC:

Fanfare over waltz--fade to

VOICE 1:

Here in the Court of the Nations, across a giant stage will flow a pageant of this Exposition city, enchanting and lovely tonight in her 1940 makeup. Young and gay and vivacious . . .

VOICE 2:

(Dramatic interruption) Ladies and gentlemen . . . We have just established contact with the Admiral Byrd Expedition in Little America in the Antarctic. It is our privilege to ask Little America to send a word of greeting to "The Fair in Forty" which will turn on the fabulous illumination system. Come in, Little America.

MUSIC:

Out abruptly.

VOICE 1:

(Short wave effect) Greetings to Treasure Island . . . Greetings filled with regret that we are not with you there tonight. It is cold and lonely here . . . but we are with you by radio . . . close to your music and laughter. And here in Little America, we are grateful for the honor of sending an electrical impulse across the thousands of miles--to turn on your magic lights. And as we say good-bye, we say "Let there be light on Treasure Island."

SOUND:

Bursting bomb.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

VOICE 1:

And there was light again on Treasure Island.

NARRATOR:

Light and music and action.

VOICES:

The Fair in Forty, with its Forty Fair Girls . . . Miss San Francisco . . . Miss California . . . Miss Treasure Island . . . Miss U. S. A.

GIRL:

(Close to mike) Hello there, America.

SOUND:

Fade in airplane in distance.

NARRATOR:

And at that moment, up in the sky, that like the land and the sea man has conquered, a girl and a boy look down upon this new Treasure Island.

SOUND:

Airplane up trifle.

BAIRD:

If only everyone could see Treasure Island from up here in the sky.

VENTER:

The Tower of the Sun, like a dagger of white fire . . .

BAIRD:

It's like flying over a giant fire opal . . . an opal lying on a rippling black velvet. It's like the Arabian Nights come true. There just couldn't be anything more beautiful . . . will you look at the light in the Court of the Moon.

VENTER:

And those silver pictures on the Pool of Reflections.

BAIRD:

Palace walls blazing . . . courtyards washed in blue . . . and fountains tumbling like bubbling gold.

VENTER:

It's amazing, a few short minutes ago, everything lost in the darkness of the night, and then suddenly all this light and color. It just doesn't seem real.

BAIRD:

It's lovely--this lovely Treasure Island. Let's hurry back and see it close to.

SOUND:

Airplane up and out.

NARRATOR:

(Cued in before airplane entirely out) And as nearly 125,000 people on Treasure Island, and millions throughout the world listen, dignified Exposition President, Marshall W. Dill, spoke words that came from the hearts of many men, that glamorous night of May 25th, 1940:

DILL:

We have not come to this day without much labor and some sacrifice. To recreate an "Evanescent City" has been our task. We of the 1940 Fair pay tribute to those who dredged this "City Beautiful" out of the silt of the Bay. They laid the sills upon which we have re-built. We are the grateful heirs of their faith and their dreaming, and in this world of tumult and strife abroad, we hope we have done something here on Treasure Island to lift the sadness from a weary day . . . a little island where peace, beauty and humanity abound. We have lighted a lamp of the spirit and we can only fervently hope that some of its rays may light the dark places.

MUSIC:

Musical comedy selection--fade to

VOICE:

And from Hollywood . . .

NARRATOR:

From the cinema capital of the world, a gift to Treasure Island. A gift of loveliness, wrapped in youth and presented in song. Seventeen-year-old Suzanna [sic] Foster, outstanding discovery in the land where discovery is the rule, and not the exception.

MUSIC:

"Kiss Me Again"--Suzanna Foster.

NARRATOR:

That night on May the 25th, nineteen hundred and forty, all who felt the spirit of this NEW Treasure Island, knew as men know that day and night will come, that it filled a need in nervous times . . . and as midnight came, that world premiere on San Francisco Bay rose to its finish . . .

MUSIC:

"Valse Triste"--fade to

VOICE:

(Venter) Beneath the white stars that tonight look down upon a world whose minutes drag themselves through a sea of blood and horror and hatred, we speak a humble prayer on a lovely Island in San Francisco Bay--Treasure Island. May God grant that those of us who may, come to this Island to reassure themselves that America is yet a Nation capable of constant peace, of lasting happiness. May God grant that all of us draw upon the spirit which created this Golden Gate International Exposition . . . the same spirit which gave it re-birth . . . and that moments like this, will be ours to treasure--always.

MUSIC:

"Omnipotence" by Male Chorus.

ANNOUNCER:

June 15th.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

But twenty days after the world premiere of 1940 streamlined Treasure Island, the word "success" hardened into reality.

SOUND:

Crowd noise . . . large crowds, millions of people.

VOICE 1:

The one millionth visitor.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

ANNOUNCER:

July 30th.

VOICE 1 :

Three million visitors have come to Treasure Island.

SOUND:

Crowd noise . . . fades to, and behind

NARRATOR:

(On cue) One million visitors every twenty days! Hundreds of thousands ahead of the most optimistic hopes. The spark-plug who kept this explosive record hitting on all sixteen cylinders . . . was modest general manager, William W. Monahan. Each Tuesday night, by the medium of radio, he kept his public interested and informed . . .

RADIO ANNOUNCER:

We are speaking to you from our studios in San Francisco, and it is now time for the weekly program, "The Exposition Speaks," which originates in the offices of W. W. Monahan. We take you now to Treasure Island.

MONAHAN:

Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. With three million people having already visited us here on Treasure Island, we are cautiously beginning to feel that we have quite a Fair on our hands. This is really no miracle. The miracle of Treasure Island happened long ago . . . in its creation and its building. The credit for our 1940 record, which we modestly admit is amazing, can go to no one man or woman. Rather, it's the old business of working like a family (and by the way, we notice lots of their families here).

Tonight, however, I'd like to throw a few orchids in the general direction of a few of the favorite sons in this Exposition family of ours. To one, H. C. Bottorff, a tribute . . . for his talent in keeping the complex machinery of Treasure Island well oiled. And a bouquet to Major Keatinge, our strong man holding down two important posts, governmental participation and special events. In the latter department, the thrill circus in the open air theater . . . the big variety shows on the Federal Plaza . . . and the daily fireworks spectacle detailed to the hands of a blind man, charming and capable personality, Charles Duffield. I want to pay tribute, too, to F. M. Sandusky, our director of exhibits and concessions for his efficient handling of this difficult and important assignment; to Emil Bondeson, director of music and shows, who arranged the outstanding events of our musical season; and to H. C. Vensano, our director of works, who is responsible for the beautiful setting in which this great pageant has been held; and to Jack James, our director of promotion whose voice extolling the wonders of Treasure Island and the West has, indeed, been heard all around the world. And I would also like to pay tribute to all those who entered so enthusiastically into our streamlined plan of 1940, exhibitors, large and small, concessionnaires, and the whole personnel of the Exposition who have toiled faithfully and long to make the Fair in Forty go down in history as an unqualified success, a pleasant memory of beauty and pageantry and fun.

MUSIC:

Introduction to "High On A Windy Hill"--fade to

NARRATOR:

1940 Treasure Island rumor had it . . . had it that one Billy Rose, New York and points north, south, east and west, had surveyed the Pacific Ocean up and down the Coast of California for a gigantic aquacade . . . had thought twice, and signed a contract with his new friend, Bill Monahan. As the ink dried on this colossal bit of paper, to Treasure Island with a fanfare, came barrel-chested Johnny Weissmuller, iron-man Marshall Wayne, and lovely Esther Williams, trailed by a gorgeous horde of Aquabelles and amid millions of gallons of water, great publicity, and great music, the show of shows was on . . . Billy Rose's Aquacade! Remember?

VOICE 1:

Morton Downey.

MUSIC:

"Yours For A Song"--Morton Downey.

ANNOUNCER:

America! Cavalcade of a Nation!

MUSIC:

"Star Spangled Banner" fanfare--tympani roll under narrator.

NARRATOR:

Like twigs and leaves and scraps of paper upon a stream, the "River of Time" has washed each great episode in American history out into the Ocean of the Past. The land, the sea, the hills remain . . . but the human clay has crumbled to dust under the destructive force of Time. Yet Time will never erase the romantic memory of this Nation's four hundred vibrant years. "America! Cavalcade of a Nation" re-lived those four hundred years, in another show of shows on Treasure Island . . . re-lived one moment in our history as vivid today as it was on the day a tall lean American stepped awkwardly before a handful of our ancestors . . .

LINCOLN:

"Gettysburg Address."

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

ANNOUNCER:

The Folies Bergere.

MUSIC:

"Orpheus Overture"--fade to

NARRATOR:

Paris in the spring was Treasure Island in 1940 . . . for as each sunset came, men talked to their wives of business and important meetings, and sped by their offices enroute to the California Auditorium on Treasure Island . . . where famed showman, Clifford Fischer, had set up one of the world's loveliest collections of blondes and brunettes. And was any man disappointed? Of course not. From front row to last row, the answer was the same. Television, ladies and gentlemen, is unfortunately just around the corner . . . so tonight, just one last glimpse of the Folies Bergere. Petite Michel.

MUSIC:

"Michel" specialty.

MUSIC:

"Angelus"--fade to

NARRATOR:

Like a few of those who rushed west in '49, and found their pot of gold, so did many who browsed around on 1940 Treasure Island, discover new delights in "Art in Action." Harvard and Groton men, and those who carve meat and drive trucks--found pleasure in this priceless Palace of Fine and Decorative Arts. The masters of the past . . . and the masters of the present, fitted into the theme of this new Treasure Island . . . life, and action. And in this new-found phase of Treasure Island, the leading name was Timothy Pflueger. What better man to tell the story?

PFLUEGER:

The idea of Art in Action came from my own enjoyment in watching the development of art projects. The thanks of the Exposition are due to one hundred artists who contributed their time in the interest of all artists, in making these demonstrations. On the other hand the thanks of the artists are due the Exposition for making available to them this opportunity. The WPA art project also contributed in accenting the Palace of Fine Arts! Several projects have been sponsored by the San Francisco Board of Education. The public was very deeply interested and I look for this form of art activity to take a permanent place not only in Expositions, but in regular established museums.

MUSIC:

Fanfare.

NARRATOR:

Memorable words of '39.

ROOSEVELT:

May this, America's World's Fair of the Pacific, truly serve all nations in symbolizing their achievements of all the ages past . . . and in amalgamating their destinies, one with every other, through all the ages to come . . .

MUSIC:

"Peking Street Suite"--fade to

NARRATOR:

Will you ever forget Pacific House . . . heart of the family of nations on Treasure Island. Serene and proud. In her halls, many languages, many ideals and heritages, differing in detail, but not in fundamentals . . . scenes that were the crossroads of the earth . . . her pictorial maps by the great Covarrubias . . . the ceramic reliefs by Sotomayor . . . glass maps by Taylor . . . a picture of this earth on which we try to live and work in peace. Pacific House! . . . her flags of all nations, her lectures, her music from all the world . . . and her symbolism of a closer unity among those nations across whose shores roll the waves of the mighty Pacific.

MUSIC:

Up and finish.

NARRATOR:

It is but a lovely step across the lagoon from Pacific House to International Court. The many thousands who visited this area found therein the essence of all the charm of the foreign nations who shared in this Exposition; nations which showed in graphic beauty lands of the tropics and of the north. The foreign participation was an integral part of this Exposition; they made it theirs. For those nations, the Dean of the San Francisco Consular Corps, Dr. Casas-Briceno, Consul-General of Venezuela, speaks.

CONSUL:

Elevating our reason and lending dignity to our will, this San Francisco Fair, gentlemen, has covered in all its aspects the transcendency of one sole purpose: to encourage confidence and peace between all people. And I am proud to proclaim that Pan America received from this Exposition a permanent promise of continental solidarity. The Golden Gate Exposition, and the gentlemen who directed it, leave with us a promising lesson of unity, and a deep reciprocal sentiment of intercontinental friendship, as well as a mutual understanding. This Exposition has revived history, and at the same time, the feeling of security for all of us--that individual liberty cannot be maintained in surroundings of international insecurity.

NARRATOR:

Folies Bergere, Cavalcade, Aquacade and the other great shows on Treasure Island caused General Manager Bill Monahan every twenty days to say . . .

VOICE:

(for Monahan) The Fourth Million . . . The Fifth Million . . . The Sixth Million . . .

NARRATOR:

And still they come . . . riding herd on the day and night job of telling the millions of what to see on Treasure Island, informing, interpreting, selling, promoting and still finding time to make himself thoroughly liked wherever he went--long, lanky, genial, straight-talking Jack James, 1940 Treasure Island's Director of Publicity and Promotion.

NARRATOR:

As 1940 Treasure Island took in the hearts of all kinds of men it presented a great panorama of the music all men will love always. The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, conducted by beloved Pierre Monteux, guest conductors Kostelanetz, Bruno Walter, Meredith Wilson and Gaetano Merola . . . and voices which have carved themselves in America's Album of Music . . . John Charles Thomas, Grace Moore, Jan Peerce, Gladys Swarthout, Lily Pons and Lauritz Melchoir, Oscar Levant . . . the blind genius, Alec Templeton.

MUSIC:

Herod Overture--fade to

NARRATOR:

On the foundations of '39 the Forty Fair was built . . . and in the panorama of great music, there was no break between the years. In '39 the series "California Composers," and to the Golden State's pride of climate and material achievements was added the new-found pride in the discovery and realization that it had made, was making, a major contribution to the realm of fine music. To the California Commission went a man with an idea, and thereafter, week after week, the west and all of Canada heard the music of California's own composers.

MUSIC:

Up and fade.

NARRATOR:

The outgrowth of California Composers was a greater, wider venture on 1940 Treasure Island. An idea had grown, and in the height of Treasure Island's summer glory, the California Music Festival took the spotlight. Invitations to great and small musical organizations were extended to come and play and sing their music . . . to give expression and to receive acclaim . . . the accomplished and the beginners . . . professional and the amateur. The movement met success. Among the gifts that Treasure Island leaves behind is the powerful impetus to the California Music Festival. As that movement is destined to live on into the future of California, so it is our privilege to bring its music back for this one night . . . directed as it was in '39 and '40 by Jack Joy.

MUSIC:

Up and finish "Herod Overture"--segue drum and march--fade to

NARRATOR:

Momentous indeed are these days roaring across the American scene. Headlines, and holocaust, and opinions and wishes and fears . . . and a nation mobilizing materially and spiritually to be faithful unto freedom no matter the cost . . We bring you now the man, who, during the birth of this great World's Fair of Western America, was chosen by the President as United States Commissioner to the Golden Gate International Exposition, George Creel. No one is better fitted to describe Federal participation than this man whose dreams and ideas became a reality. Mr. Creel . . .

CREEL:

Here on Treasure Island, the Federal Exhibits Building has towering above it the forty-eight Golden Colonnades representing our 48 states. Behind its muraled walls depicting the conquering of the West by water . . . and by land . . . is our Federal "Government in Action" . . . and in the cast, the Army, the Navy, the Marine Corps . . . and the dramatic, rough-and-ready Coast Guard. Here, too, we have the intricate machinery to keep abreast of 1940's social economic change and problems, Social Security, WPA, Housing, Slum-Clearance, Reclamation projects, reforestation, electrification, highways . . . the Department of Agriculture. (Cue, Treasure Island Company marches in front of stage) (very slight pause). One display of the might of this free nation of America made hearts beat faster each Treasure Island evening in this great Federal Plaza.

ANNOUNCER:

This is the Voice of the Exposition. Ladies and gentlemen . . . there will be a colorful and patriotic ceremony in front of the Federal Building . . . carried out by the Treasure Island Company, United States Army, and the Thirtieth Infantry Band. . . . The members of the Company were selected from the regular Army regiments in the Ninth Corps Area, and are permanently quartered at Camp Hunter Liggett on the Exposition grounds. The ritual of lowering and folding the American flag is one of the greatest importance. Our care of the flag is symbolic of the esteem in which we hold our country. The flag must never touch the ground, and great care is taken in folding it upon its being lowered. The red and white is always folded into the blue of the night. This ceremony, called Retreat, will at this moment give way to the lowering of the flag. It is a proper mark of respect for ALL of us to stand as the flag is lowered . . . to observe silence, the men removing their hats and holding hat or hand over their hearts.

SOUND:

Flag Lowering Ceremony . . .

MUSIC:

Treasure Island Company Band . . . Troops march off.

NARRATOR:

Eyes clear, figures stiff and strong and straight . . . hearts and bodies moulded into one unswerving unity by the greatest love of all--the love of this country of America. Marching off into the nighttime shadows created by the blazing lights of this farewell Story of Treasure Island in humanity-packed Federal Plaza--the Treasure Island Company of the Regular Army . . .. under the leadership of Lt. Col. Raymond Godfrey Lehman.

MUSIC:

Drum roll--March.

NARRATOR:

Symbolic, too, of the strength of this Nation, the works of one of its 48 states . . . the Golden State of California, represented by the California Commission, guided and directed by Frank W. Clark . . . and assisting Mr. Clark in the administration of the California Commission activities were Bob Penfield, James Smyth, Rusty Mikel, Phil Van Dusen, Fred Grey, and Claude Cooper.

VOICE:

Magnificent California . . .. Empire of beauty in which man has achieved, not perfection, but a record of progress through agriculture, shipping, industry, recreation and climate that is a bright spot in the annals of this nation's history.

NARRATOR:

Grouped on Treasure Island--18 lovely buildings, representing the limitless resources of California.

VOICES:

Redwood Empire . . . man-made counterpart of the oldest living things . . . Alameda-Contra Costa Building . . . recreation and sunshine and good living . . . San Joaquin Valley Building . . . the richness of the Earth stretched forth between the mountains . . . Sacramento-Tahoe Building . . . Capital of the Golden State . . . mountain retreats and historic border towns . . . Southern Counties Building . . . family of great producers of the nation's finest food . . . San Francisco Building . . . the fabulous history of a fabulous city . . .

VOICE:

The California Building!

SOUND:

Fire siren.

VOICES:

(Repeat) Fire, Fire, Fire, Fire!

MUSIC:

"Orgy of Spirits."

NARRATOR:

Saturday, August 24th . . . a burst of flame and fire clawed at the timbers and walls and very foundation of the lovely California Building. The host building of Treasure Island . . . home of western hospitality . . . open house for a fun-seeking nation . . . burning . . . an inferno.

SOUND:

Up sirens.

SOUND:

Crackle of fire.

VOICE:

There's a breeze!

VOICE 2:

There's a fortune in art treasures in there!

VOICE 3:

And a pipe-organ.

VOICE 4:

(Shouts) Here come the soldiers . . .

NARRATOR:

As the fire caught huge curtains and jumped hungrily for the bright dry wood, scores of our soldiers from the Treasure Island Company dashed into the blazing symbol of California, began removing every priceless painting and object of art. Through their courageous work, an unreplaceable record of California's past was saved from black ashes. Not heroes, said they . . . only soldiers functioning in the routine of duty. And we say--in peace as in war, they are beside us.

VOICE:

As though incensed at the removal of those things of greatest value, the fire howled on to reduce the California Building to ruins, and even as it burned, radio, . . . fast, mobile radio, was on the scene from coast to coast . . .

RADIO ANNOUNCER:

(Excited) Ladies and gentlemen, we are standing beside the blazing California Building on Treasure Island, not blazing in beauty, but in fire . . .

VOICE:

There's Frank Clark and Bob Penfield of the California Commission.

RADIO ANNOUNCER:

Mr. Clark . . . over here, please. You're Chairman of the California Commission, which erected this lovely building. No need to ask you how you must feel at this moment . . .

CLARK:

Well . . . I feel like any good Californian. This is terrible . . . terrible. But this won't stop a thing here on Treasure Island. The show goes on . . . and the California Commission will be right in there giving the public everything on schedule!

MUSIC:

Up and finish.

NARRATOR:

(Softly) Beside mountain lakes in the still of night . . . where the Mississippi meets the full moon and the darkies and the cotton . . . in pent-house cabarets above 42nd street . . . in little farm-house living rooms . . . all who are American have felt the spirit of a now fragile and white-haired woman who many years ago poured out her heart in music as ageless as love. She is Carrie Jacobs Bond and she is here tonight--on Treasure Island. If this be Treasure Island's end . . . it is the end of a perfect day. The past gave to Carrie Jacobs Bond her inspiration for that song . . . and tonight I see in her face, and in her eyes, that this moment of 1940 is as great as that day so many years ago. End of a Perfect Day . . .

CARRIE JACOBS BOND:

Piano. "End Of A Perfect Day."

ORCHESTRA:

Builds into number. Solo and duet.

NARRATOR:

(Cue) To you, Treasure Island, farewell. Much you have given us. The beauty of dawn and the beauty of sunset. Joy of abandon and forgetfulness. Tonight we find that joy is sorrow, and sorrow joy . . . and both are sweet. Here, in your lovely, wordless way, you have taught us friendship. The good and the bad have come to you and you have had gifts for all who would receive them. As the world has lived, your life was all too short. It seems but yesterday you lay beneath the sea . . . but who are we to reckon Time . . . for today, tonight are but our future memories, and we will have them each new day. We will--we promise you.

MUSIC:

"Taps"--segue to cymbal and tympani roll.

NARRATOR:

(Change of pace throughout) The end of a perfect day is but the dawn of a greater day. Each good life that passes from this earth leaves behind it material for the betterment of life to come. Treasure Island's perfect day is ending . . . but it is not Death for Treasure Island; it is just new life. The flowers may fade, the palaces may fall to earth, the music and laughter stilled . . . the face may change but the soul never . . . for the dreams of men are never stifled, never crushed.

Closer to a greater destiny!

Ready for a greater task!

As God measures Time, it is but tomorrow that huge airplanes will glide down through the air which tonight is ruled by the Tower of the Sun . . . will roll across the ground where Pacific House now stands. Let there be no sadness tonight . . . for remember, sorrow is of the past and joy is of the future. And so it is we say to Treasure Island . . . a salute to a greater future that starts--tonight!

MUSIC:

"Glory" by Cadman.

MUSIC:

Trumpet "Reveille."

SIGNOFF

ANNOUNCER:

Ladies and gentlemen, "The Story of Treasure Island" was written by Glenn A. Wheaton and produced by Robert C. Coleson, with music directed by Jack Joy. Narrators were John B. Hughes, Arthur Linkletter, Mel Venter and Don Thompson. The voice of the President of the United States was imitated by Fred McKaye. Suzannah Foster, from the new film, "There's Magic in Music," appeared through the courtesy of Paramount Pictures. "The Story of Treasure Island," presented by the California Commission of the Golden Gate International Exposition, came from the great stage in the Federal Plaza, through the radio facilities of the California Commission.

We return you to your local studios.