Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Big Town
Show: Occupied Paris
Date: Sep 05 1942

Transcribed by Adam Irish
The Middlebury Radio Theater of Thrills & Suspense

NEWSBOY:

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MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

The new anti-sneeze Rinso presents "Big Town" starring Edward G. Robinson with Ona Mudson.

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

Good evening, folks, this is Ken Niles. We are happy to announce that this broadcast is being made available to our armed forces based overseas. You know, an old proverb that I just thought of, says if you want a whiter wash well done just leave it to Rinso. And how true that is. Why, those quick acting Rinso suds are tough as nails on dirt and grime, yet safe for washable colors. And with Rinso, you can hustle through a load of clothes with as little as a five-minute run in your washer. How's that for saving your clothes and easing up on your trusty machine? That washer's got to last for the duration you know. If I were you I'd have it checked right now by a reliable dealer. And I'd certainly get the new anti-sneeze Rinso tomorrow! And now, Big Town.

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

The makers of Rinso bring you the star of Big Town, Edward G. Robinson as Steve Wilson, managing editor of the Illustrated Press, with Ona Munson Laurelie Kilborne, girl reporter. Until recently, Steve and Laurelie have always been on the receiving end of the news, in Big Town. Now we find them where news is being made: in war-torn Europe, grabbing headlines hot from the fire in Lisbon, Portugal. But before we join Steve and Laurelie, let's stop for a minute in Big Town, America, and find out what's going on there.

CARS HONKING, BUSY STREET

NEWSBOY:

Get your illustrated press here. D.C. agrees to dismantle warships in Motanique. Read Steve Wilson's sensational dispatches from Lisbon!

MUSIC

MCNOULTY:

Hello? Cable atlantic operator? Big Town calling Lisbon.

OPERATOR:

This is Lisbon.

MCNOULTY:

The Illustrated Press calling Mr. Steve Wilson.

OPERATOR:

Lisbon is ready.

MCNOULTY:

All right, Lisbon. Just a second. I have Mr. Wilson for you, Mr. Fletcher.

FLETCHER:

Oh, that's swell, McNoulty.

HOKEY:

Boy, it'll be good to hear the boss's voice again. Can I listen in, Fletcher?

FLETCHER:

Well, sure, Hokey. Grab that other phone.

HOKEY:

Oh, swell.

FLETCHER:

Hello? Are you there, Steve?

WILSON:

Well, sure. You don't have to shout like that Fletcher, just like talking to Brooklyn.

FLETCHER:

Oh, oh I see.

WILSON:

(Laughs)

FLETCHER:

Well, here's what I called about. Uh, we've been getting some mysterious letters
from Paris all addressed to you.

WILSON:

Well, how could that be? No mail is reaching the United State from Paris.

FLETCHER:

Well, these letters are smuggled out and mailed in London. Or they're full of dynamite, Steve. Red hot news about the underground revolt in occupied France.

WILSON:

Hmm.

FLETCHER:

We've been running them in the Illustrated Press and circulation is up 20,000 a day.

WILSON:

Well, who wrote the letters?

FLETCHER:

Well, uh, they're unsigned, but they're written in English. And in every letter we find a certain phrase repeated over and over again. A phrase I think you remember. The phrase: "By the same token." Who does that remind you off?

WILSON:

By the same... Well, Art Mason!

FLETCHER:

Of course! Art Mason used to be our Paris correspondent. Do you remember we always used to kid him about using that phrase in all his dispatches?

WILSON:

You bet I do. Why, I haven't heard from art since we got into the war. Not since I burned the cables telling him to leave his beloved Paris and come home.

FLETCHER:

Well, he's using that phrase now to identify himself. He's still there in Paris and still sending. Uh, Steve. Do you think you can contact him?

WILSON:

Well, no, no, no not from Lisbon.

FLETCHER:

Umhmm.

WILSON:

Laurelie and I will grab a plane for Vichy today. Maybe Art has an underground connection there and I'll try to get word to him.

FLETCHER:

Well, swell.

WILSON:

Give out love to gang! So long!

FLETCHER:

Well, goodbye, Steve, take good care of yourself!

WILSON & LAURELIE:

We will, now! Goodbye!

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

And now, to Lisbon. To the headquarters of the Nazi secret police.

MUSIC STING

DOOR OPENS, FOOTSTEPS

RITTER:

Captain Heinrich?

HEINRICH:

Yah, Ritter?

RITTER:

We have just listened in on an interesting trans-Atlantic telephone conversation between the American Steve Wilson and his newspaper, the Illustrated Press.

HEINRICH:

So?

RITTER:

Wilson and Frauline Kilborne are flying to Vichy today. They will try to contact a man named... Mason.

HEINRICH:

Mason! If we could only lay our hands on him! Ritter, I want a complete transcription of Wilson's telephone conversation with America.

RITTER:

Yes, sir.

HEINRICH:

I also want to know the plane on which his reservations have been made. I'll call
our headquarters in Paris. They may have some special instructions concerning our American editor.

MUSIC

AIRPORT ANNOUNCER:

Arriving Aerometer first run way. Taking of California second runway.

LAURELIE:

Steven, did you ever see so many planes from so many countries! So many people going so many places!

WILSON:

Well, Lisbon is the one focal terminal left for what commercial air travel they still have in Europe.

AIRPORT ANNOUNCER:

Taking off British Air first run way. Arriving Lufthansa second runway.

LAURELIE:

British, German and Italian planes side by side on the same field.

WILSON:

Yes. And elsewhere, they're shooting each other out of the skies. Things here are implausible, illogical, and unbelievable, yet they're happening.

FOREIGNER:

Are you Monsieur Wilson?

WILSON:

Well, yes.

FOREIGNER:

You are leaving for Vichy?

WILSON:

That's right.

FOREIGNER:

There is a message for you in this envelope, Monsieur. Read it when you get aboard the plane, then destroy it please.

WILSON:

Now, wait a minute, uh, who gave you this?

FOREIGNER:

You will know when you read it. Bon voyage, Monsieur!

AIRPORT ANNOUNCER:

Third Runway. Destination Vichy. All passengers aboard.

CROWD JOSTLING

WILSON:

Well, here we go Laurelie. Oh, steward. Is this the gate for the Vichy plane?

STEWARD:

Oui, Monsieur. We have so many passengers for this trip to Vichy, that two planes are leaving. Your tickets?

WILSON:

Here you are.

STEWARD:

Merci, Monsieur. You have a last-minute reservation. You and madame are on the second plane. Come, I take you aboard.

CROWD, DISTINCT GERMAN VOICES

LAURELIE:

Well, there are a lot of passengers for Vichy. Most of them seem to be German.

WILSON:

Yes, I noticed that. With the vultures all flying in one direction, there must be a fresh carcass to pick. Well, here, careful of these steps.

STEWARD:

Bon voyage, Monsieur, Madame. Your seats are numbers one and three.

WILSON:

Well, thank you steward. Our seats are up here in front, Laurelie. Well, there weren't many extra passengers at that. Except for those three men in the rear seats, we have this plane to ourselves.

LAURELIE:

I'm dying to know what's in that envelope.

WILSON:

So am I.

ENVELOPE OPENED

WILSON:

Mmm. Get this. If you're interested in art, advise you stop in Hotel Celestaine, in Vichy. Others interested in art will contact you. Try to get the picture "France Will Rise Again."

LAURELIE:

There's no signature!

WILSON:

"If you're interested in art." I wonder if that means Art Mason?

LAURELIE:

Of course it does!

WILSON:

"Try to get the picture." In slang, that would mean try to understand.

LAURELIE:

Well, then "France would rise again." It must be some kind of a code.

WILSON:

You hit it, Laurelie. Art Mason must have found out we were in Lisbon and leaving for Vichy and would try to contact us there. I think we've made the right move!

PLANE TAKING OFF

MUSIC

THRUM OF PLANE MOTOR

LAURELIE:

Steve, wake up! Wake up, Steve.

WILSON:

Erh? Oh. Oh! Yes. Hello, there, Laurelie.

LAURELIE:

Hello.

WILSON:

Where are we now?

LAURELIE:

Well, we're almost there. You've been sleeping like a baby.

WILSON:

(laughs) So I have.

LAURELIE:

Look out the window. You can see Vichy ahead.

WILSON:

Ergh. So that's the capital of France. Must have grown since I was here last. Say, that's strange.

LAURELIE:

What is?

WILSON:

The lights are out all over the city.

LAURELIE:

You're right. They are. I didn't know they had blackouts in Vichy.

WILSON:

Could be a practice blackout, although wouldn't do them much good with that full moon overhead.

LAURELIE:

We're losing altitude, getting ready to land.

WILSON:

And look here. There's something wrong, Laurelie.

LAURELIE:

Well, what do you mean?

WILSON:

Well, Vichy has no river running through the center of it. Unless I've gone crazy, that's the Seine!

LAURELIE:

Seine! But that's in Paris!

WILSON:

Of course it is, and that just where we're about to land, in Nazi occupied Paris!

LAURELIE:

But how could that happen!

WILSON:

Oh, that business of steering us to another plane was a trick of some sort. The steward who showed us aboard must have been a fake. They've put one over on us!

HEINRICH:

Exactly, Herr Wilson, and there's nothing you can do about it. Ritter, Engel, keep an eye on them! I am Captain Heinrich, of the German military police.

WILSON:

Hey, was it you who had this plane routed to Paris?

HEINRICH:

Yes.

LAURELIE:

But why? We're not spies! We're American citizens, traveling from one neutral country to another.

HEINRICH:

Dangerous citizens who must be put away. While you were in Lisbon, you worked hand in hand with British intelligence. Also we don't like the stories you send your American newspaper.

WILSON:

You mean you don't like the truth? This plane is flying under the insignia of Vichy, France. If you land us in Paris, you'll be violating the laws of neutrality.

HEINRICH:

One violation more or less will not matter. You're under arrest for trying to attempt illegal entry into a German military zone.

WILSON:

Well! You deliberately reroute our plane, and then accuse us of an illegal attempt to get across the border! Well, that's typical Hitler logic!

HEINRICH:

The plane is landing, Herr Wilson. You better sit down.

PLANE LANDING

HEINRICH:

My orders were to deliver you alive. Please let me carry them out.

MUSIC

FRENCH TRAFFIC

WILSON:

Where are you taking us in this car, Captain Heinrich?

HEINRICH:

First to our headquarters for questioning. You'll enjoy that.

WILSON:

I'm sure we will. What section of Paris are we passing through now?

HEINRICH:

The industrial district. In the factories on both sides of this street Frenchmen used to make a famous French car. Now they manufacture bombing planes for the Third Reich!

LAURELIE:

But the factories are dark. Don't your slaves work at night?

WILSON:

No, the Nazis work them fourteen hours a day, Laurelie. They have to let the poor devils get some sleep, or they wouldn't be able to go on.

HEINRICH:

That's quite enough you two! Keep your mouths shut or I'll shut them for you!

AIR RAID SIREN


HEINRICH:

(German words) Engel, pull to the curb, stop the car!

CAR STOPPING

LAURELIE:

What's that whistle, Steve?

WILSON:

Sounds like an air raid alarm.

HEINRICH:

That's just what it is! The planes are overhead now. The British are raiding us again!

WILSON:

You mean those are British planes in the sky?

HEINRICH:

Mmhar! Some of your American planes, too, you schweinhund.

WILSON:

Well, your air raid alarm is a little late. In my country, we sound an alert before the final alarm is heard.

HEINRICH:

French saboteurs who cut the wires. They welcome those British dogs! Get out of the car, both of you. We've got to fine shelter. If you try any tricks, I'll shoot you down.

WILSON:

Keep close to me, Laurelie, this may be our one chance to get away from him.
Planes flying low

FRENCHMEN:

Look out! It's coming! It's coming for us! Look out!

BOMBS

MUSIC

CROWDS, CONFUSION

LAURELIE:

How 'bout it, Steve? Are we alive or dead?

WILSON:

Alive, I think. Oh, it sounded as if the whole world we crashing around my ears.

LAURELIE:

Oh, yes, definitely. I can hardly hear a thing! What happened to our friends, the Nazis?

WILSON:

The driver of the car and the guard got their tickets, all right. They're lying out there in the street. And here's Captain Heinrich, laid out as neatly as you please.

LAURELIE:

Is he dead?

WILSON:

No, afraid not. No, unconscious, that's all. My, look at those factory buildings burn!

LAURELIE:

Steve, there's some German soldiers coming!

WILSON:

Yes, I see them, don't get excited. Just keep moving.

LAURELIE:

But where on earth can we go?

WILSON:

I don't know. Paris is crawling with Nazis. We may get caught any minute. Somehow we've got to find Art Mason! He's our only hope!

MUSIC

APPLAUSE

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

This is Ken Niles again. We'll return you to Big Town in just a moment, but first?

"POP GOES THE WEASEL" MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

Oh, boy! Am I glad to see you!

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Be sure to get new Rinso,
You'll fly through washday like a breeze,
If you get Rinso!

ANNOUNCER:

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WHITE:

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SNEEZE:

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ANNOUNCER:

What? But how? Wha-a...

WHITE:

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SNEEZE:

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WHITE:

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SNEEZE:

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WHITE:

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SNEEZE:

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ANNOUNCER:

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RINSO GIRLS:

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MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

Please stay tuned in at the end of this program for exciting new about next week's show. And now back to Steve and Laurelie in Paris...

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

We left Steve and Laurelie as they escaped from the scene of a British air raid on military objectives in Paris. Two Americans in desperate need of a hiding place, with enemies all around them... And now we find them in cab being driven through the Paris streets...

HORSE ON COBBLESTONES

WILSON:

Well, lucky thing we found a cab driver who didn't suspect my French.

LAURELIE:

Or at least he didn't appear to. You know, he's a dear old thing. Didn't you ever see such a lovely mustache? (laughs)

WILSON:

Makes him look like a walrus.

LAURELIE:

A sweet old walrus! Are we being followed?

WILSON:

Oh! No, I don't see any sign of it. But you never can tell.

DRIVER:

Whoa, mon cherie. You have arrived, Monsieur. 422 Rue Washington.

WILSON:

All right, driver. Now, you wait in the cab, Laurelie. This is the house where Art Mason and I used to share a room together. Probably isn't here anymore, but the landlady may know where I can find him.

LAURELIE:

Look Steve, there's a woman just going into the house.

WILSON:

Hmm. Pardon mais moi Madame.

MADAME:

Oh! Oui, Monsieur?

WILSON:

I'm looking for Madame Perron. Would you call her please?

MADAME:

That would be difficult, Monsieur. Madame Perron is dead.

WILSON:

Dead?

MADAME:

Oui. She was among the refuges who were killed on the highways as they tried to escape from Paris.

WILSON:

Well, I'm terribly sorry to hear that. But what about her little son, Pierre? What happened to him?

MADAME:

I do not know. Pierre is gone too.

WILSON:

Poor little devil. Well, are there any of Madame Perron's old lodgers living in this house?

MADAME:

No. German officers live here now.

WILSON:

France will rise again, Madame.

MADAME:

Shhh! Be careful where you say those words! Who are you?

WILSON:

I'm a friend of France. I'm looking for an old comrade, an American. Arthur Mason. You know him?

MADAME:

I know of him. He's not here now. Go to the Hotel de Catsur, Boulevard De Strasbow. Ask the night clerk at the desk. That's all I can tell you.

WILSON:

Merci, Madame. The Hotel de Cat Seur.

MUSIC STING

BELL ON DOOR

WILSON:

This is it, Laurelie. The Hotel of the Four Sisters.

CLERK:

At your service, Monsieur.

WILSON:

Oh, are you the night clerk?

CLERK:

Oui, Monsieur. What can I do for you?

WILSON:

Well, I'm trying to locate an old friend. I understand he stopped here at one time. Perhaps he left a forwarding address.

CLERK:

His name please?

WILSON:

Mason.

CLERK:

Mason! His first name?

WILSON:

Arthur. Arthur Mason.

CLERK:

Uh, many people come here looking for Monsieur Mason. Some of them speak French with a German accent.

WILSON:

Well, I'm American.

CLERK:

Wuh?

WILSON:

Look, here's my passport.

CLERK:

Ah, oui.

WILSON:

This lady and I are in trouble and we've got to find Mason tonight. We don't mean to do him any harm, quite the contrary. We need his help.

CLERK:

I... I think I understand. Attention!

WILSON & LAURELIE:

(Gasp)

CLERK:

Don't look! Continue talking to me. A Gestapo car has just stopped outside this hotel! The men inside it are watching you through the window.

LAURELIE:

Oh, I knew they'd find us!

WILSON:

Don't lose your nerve, Laurelie.

LAURELIE:

Don't lose yours! What are we going to do?

CLERK:

Attendez, Monsieur! I place the hotel register before you so, you sign your name as though you are going to become a guest here. You understand?

PEN SCRATCHING

WILSON:

That's right. We've got to make them think they have us in a trap. Now, what happens next?

CLERK:

Now I pretend to show you to the corridor that leads to your rooms. Follow me please!

LAURELIE:

We're right with you! If we only had some luggage, it might look real!

CLERK:

But instead, I show you to this door, which opens to the back alley. I will get word to Mason.

WILSON:

Good. You tell him Steve Wilson is here. Tell him to meet us at Mimi's.

CLERK:

At Mimi's. Oui. Bon soir, Monsieur, Madame! Bon soir!

WILSON & LAURELIE:

Bon soir!

WILSON:

And God bless you. Come on, Laurelie.

LAURELIE:

Oh, that was a narrow shave!

WILSON:

Oh, we're not out of it yet. Here, watch your step, it's as black as the ace of spades in this alley.

LAURELIE:

(gasp) Oh!

WILSON:

What's the matter?

LAURELIE:

There's something lying here on the ground! I think it's the body of a man! I nearly fell over him!

WILSON:

Wait a minute, until I strike a match.

DRIVER:

Don't light a match!

LAURELIE:

(gasp)

WILSON:

Great Scott! Who are you?

DRIVER:

The driver of your cad, Monsieur. The man lying on the ground is an agent of the Gestapo. He was waiting here for you. He will wait no more.

LAURELIE:

What did you do to him?

DRIVER:

Does it matter? Once Nazi less to free France. The cab is waiting at the end of the alley. Hurry!

FOOTSTEPS

WILSON:

Why should you risk your life to help us?

DRIVER:

Because the Gestapo wants you. That is enough for me. Are you English spies?

WILSON:

No, we're Americans. We're hunting for another American, good friend, Art Mason. We've got to find him tonight!

DRIVER:

Here's my cab.

DOOR SLAM

DRIVER:

Get in, quick!

DOOR SLAM

DRIVER:

You should have told me you wanted Monsieur Mason!

WILSON:

How should we know you were to be trusted?

DRIVER:

The little people of France are still to be trusted, Monsieur. They are still fighting for liberty!

WILSON:

I believe that, driver. Take us to the park, the Woa de Bealurne.

LAURELIE:

But you told the clerk you'd meet Mason at Mimi's!

WILSON:

I know, that's where she is, in the Woa de Bealurne.

MUSIC STING

FLOWING WATER, WOODSY NOISES

LAURELIE:

Why, the Woa de Bealurne isn't like a park at all! It's more like a forest!

WILSON:

Yes, you could get lost in here if you didn't know your way around.

LAURELIE:

But you said you were going to meet Art Mason at Mimi's.

WILSON:

Mmhm.

LAURELIE:

Now don't tell me Mimi lives here among the trees!

WILSON:

There's Mimi.

LAURELIE:

Where?

WILSON:

That broken statue of Psyche standing there in the middle of the pool.

LAURELIE:

Wha? Well, she certainly looks devilish, doesn't she.

WILSON:

Well, that's why Art and I called her Mimi.

LAURELIE:

Laughs

WILSON:

Used to meet here in the old days. (chuckles) We've hiked through these woods a hundred times.

LAURELIE:

What?

WILSON:

I hope the clerk got word to him. I'm banking that he'll show up.

LAURELIE:

Well, I hope you're right! I've already got the jitters. I never did care for the wood at night.

SIGNAL WHISTLE

LAURELIE:

What's that?

PIERRE:

Bon soir, Monsieur, Madame.

WILSON:

Holy smoke! A kid!

PIERRE:

Don't you remember me, Monsieur Wilson? I am Pierre, the son of Madame Perron!

WILSON:

Pierre? Oh, well, I'd never know it. Well, you've certainly grown since I saw you last.

PIERRE:

Oui. These days in Paris, a fellow gets to be a man very quickly. But I am twelve!

WILSON:

(chuckles) I beg your pardon, this is Laurelie.

LAURELIE:

Hello, Pierre! Forgive me for saying it, but you look as if you don't get enough to eat!

PIERRE:

I think I have never had enough to eat, Mademoiselle. There are thousands of boys like me in Paris. Boys whose fathers and mothers have been killed by the Nazis. They call us the wild boys of the streets. I am a leader of my own gang!

WILSON:

Well, have you got your gang with you?

PIERRE:

They are never very far away from me. Monsieur Mason got word you were here. He could not come himself so he sent me to get you.

WILSON:

Oh, you know where he is?

PIERRE:

Oh, but of course! My boys and I - we work with him! We help to deliver his underground newspaper - La Liberte. We are working for free France!

LAURELIE:

And you can take us to him tonight?

PIERRE:

Oui, Mademoiselle. At once. You come with me!

HEINRICH:

Stop where you are!

PIERRE:

The Gestapo!

HEINRICH:

Quick, Bender, grab that boy!

BENDER:

I've got him, Captain Heinreich!

STRUGGLING

PIERRE:

Let me go!

BENDER:

Be quiet, you!

SMACK

WILSON:

Here, now!

LAURELIE:

Oh, you filthy beast!

HEINRICH:

These wild boys must be controlled, Frauline. Their bite is poisoning. I trust you haven't forgotten me, Herr Wilson? Captain Heinrich?

WILSON:

I'll never forget you.

HEINRICH:

We lost you once tonight, but we won't lose you again. We've trailed you from one place to another, knowing you'd lead us to Mason.

WILSON:

Well, that's where you made a great mistake. We don't know where he is.

HEINRICH:

Ah, but the boy knows! And I don't think we'll have much trouble with him. We have methods that make even strong men tell all they know.

PIERRE:

You can torture me, but I will never tell you!

HEINRICH:

I think you will, gutter rat! Bring him along, Bender!

BENDER:

Ya!

HEINRICH:

You're coming with us, Wilson. You too, Frauline. Our car is waiting down the road. Stop moving!

PIERRE:

I'm werve (?) moi breve, I'm werve! Vive la France! (start of boy riot)

HEINRICH:

It's the wild boys!

BENDER:

This is bad, Captain! They are fooling us!

HEINRICH:

Take cover, Bender! I'll take them!

CHAOS

PIERRE:

Mademoiselle! Now is the time! Follow me, we will steal their car!

GUNSHOTS

WILSON:

It's the Gestapo's car, that's a swell idea!

MUSIC

WILSON:

Well, you old scoundrel, Art Mason! (chuckles) Well, it's certainly good to see you again!

LAUGHTER

MASON:

Same here, Steve. I never thought our next meeting would be under these conditions.

LAURELIE:

Well, it's quite an elaborate hide-out you have down here, Art!

MASON:

Yes, the catacombs under this old cathedral must have been built over five hundred years ago. They've hidden many a revolutionary in the past. This isn't the first time France has fought for her freedom, you know.

WILSON:

You know Art, those newsletters you sent to the press created a sensation in Big Town. We've got to have more of them!

MASON:

You'll get them, Steve. One of my workers will contact you regularly.

PAPER RUSTLING

MASON:

Here's the code he'll use.

WILSON:

Thanks, Art.

MASON:

Make sure you don't lose it.

WILSON:

No, I won't.

MASON:

But first I've got to get you two out of Paris.

WILSON:

Well, I don't see how it can be done.

MASON:

Well, it has been done. It is being done. You mnow this is one of the stations on the underground route for smuggling refugees into the unoccupied zone.

DOOR OPENING

MASON:

Well, it's about time you got here, Major!

MAJOR:

(something in German) Herr Mason.

LAURELIE:

(gasp)

MAJOR:

Herr rey?

MASON:

So bod nime! Ko bad dirime! (Something in German)

MAJOR:

Something in german

MASON:

I want you to meet two friends of mine, Steve Wilson and Laurelie Kilbourne.

MAJOR:

Something in german

WILSON:

Say, what is this, Art. A German officer in uniform? What the devil is he doing here?

MASON:

(laughs) Tell him, Major!

MAJOR:

As a matter a fact, Mr. Wilson, I'm as much of an American as you are.

WILSON:

What!

MASON:

You see, Germany has no monopoly on secret agents. Our men of the United States intelligence get around too! I can't tell you the Major's real name, but he's just finished an assignment in Berlin and Paris. My job is to help him get out of here, into unoccupied territory. All we needed was a Gestapo car and we've got one now, thanks to you and Pierre!

MAJOR:

Yes, we'll be leaving at once, Mr. Wilson.

WILSON:

We?

MAJOR:

Yes! We have German uniform for you. You'll be my military chauffeur. All you'll have to do is keep quiet.

WILSON:

Well, that shouldn't be difficult.

MASON:

You'll have to cross the border before daybreak. Do you think you can stand another trip tonight, Laurelie?

LAURELIE:

Well, I'm game.

MAJOR:

Well, it won't be fun, exactly and I can't promise it will succeed. You ready to change, Wilson?

WILSON:

Yes, I'm ready. Say, look here, Art. Why can't you come with us?

MASON:

Well, Steve, my work is here. I can't leave my wild boys. They need me. I'll get word to you from time to time. Bye old man. So long, Laurelie. Send my regards to all the boys in Big Town!

MUSIC

CAR

MAJOR:

Slow up, Wilson. It's the border of unoccupied France. The last station under German military control. Sit tight, both of you, say nothing unless you have to.

GUARD:

Uddup! Achtung! Your name, something?

MAJOR:

Reinhardt, third division. En route to Vichy. Here are my papers.

GUARD:

Thank you, Herr Major. Everything is in order here, Major.

MAJOR:

Thank you. Proceed, driver.

CAR STARTS

GUARD:

One moment, please!

MAJOR:

Huh?

GUARD:

We have a description of this car. It was stolen from the Gestapo last night in Paris. Wait until I see the number. You'll have to come inside. I will report this to my captain.

MAJOR:

Oh, come inside! Nonsense! We're late already!

WILSON:

It's my fault, Herr Major. The car ordered for this trip broke down last night and I found this one abandoned on the street near the L'Oboi de Beloit. Knowing you had to leave at one, I commandeered it in your name.

MAJOR:

Oh, you stupid fool! You should have reported this to me! My apologies to the Gestapo, Sergeant. Tell them I'll send their car back from Vichy, huh?

GUARD:

But I can't let you go on Major! My orders are very strict.

MAJOR:

My orders are that you ignore any orders you may have received. I am on business for the Fuhrer, I am not to be delayed. Understand?

GUARD:

But Herr Major? at least, let me call my captain?

MAJOR:

Get out of my way or I'll run you down! Drive on you idiot! Drive on!
Car driving away

WILSON:

Ya, ya Herr Major.

CAR

WILSON:

Oh, boy. I never thought we'd make it that time.

MAJOR:

It's a lucky thing for us there were no commissioned officers at the border.

LAURELIE:

Oh, I'm just about ready to collapse!

MAJOR:

Well, we're in the unoccupied zone now. Keep going, Wilson.

WILSON:

Don't worry, I will. Goodbye, Paris. I hope I'll see you again someday. Someday when you're free!

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

Stay tuned in please, in thirty seconds we're going to give you a hair-raising highlight of next week's show!

ANNOUNCER:

Morning, evening, noon and night - there are dishes to wash and grease to fight. And that's where the new Anti-Sneeze Rinso is tops! I'm telling you ladies, with those rich go-getter suds in action, the stubbornest grease coated pan emerges from the pan with a dazzling sparkle! And Rinso's easy on your hands - it doesn't get them all rough and red. Yes, it's all that and thrifty too! Costs less than a cent a day to do your dishes the Rinso way! So get new Anti-Sneeze Rinso tomorrow! Remember, that's a scene from the middle of the story, not the end. Same time, same station. Next Thursday night.

MUSIC

ANNOUNCER:

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FOGHORN

ANNOUNCER:

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FOGHORN

MUSIC

NEWSBOY:

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MUSIC UP AND OUT